200
/Divers/Programming-FIAF-Affiliates-Online-Film-Collections.php
en

IU Libraries/ Noel Photos

Programming (Online) Film Heritage:

The FIAF Programming Game

Access the online form HERE.

You are probably aware that a page of the FIAF website maintained by the FIAF Programming and Access to Collections Commission (PACC) references FIAF affiliates’ websites, YouTube channels and other streaming platforms that provide free access to a wide range of film heritage gems from all over the world – amateur films, documentaries, newsreels, short fiction, animation, recently restored feature films, etc… That’s literally tens of thousands of films for us to enjoy, at a time when so many cinemas have been closed and billions (!) of us around the world have been confined to our homes with our computers, tablets, and smartphones, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While we are strongly encouraging all film buffs out there to explore the large online film collections of the dozens of streaming platforms referenced on that dedicated webpage, we know that browsing through tens of thousands of titles can be a rather daunting experience. So we thought that we could ask YOU to play programmer and suggest a personal programme of films selected from all those freely accessible online. It will then be published below, for everyone's enjoyment.

If you are interested in contributing to this collective programming exercise, please open, fill in and submit this ONLINE FORM. Do add a short introduction explaining your programming choices if you can (it doesn't have to be in English), as well as the title, date (if known), running time and exact URL of each film in your programme, and the institution it comes from. Note that if you are a registered member of the FIAF community and you are logged in, your personal details will already be filled in. Also note that you will be still able to modify or remove your programme even after you have submitted it (you will receive a unique URL by email allowing you to access your form).

The only rules we would like to set are as follows:

  • The total length of the programme must not exceed 90 mins, unless it includes a feature-length film, as the purpose of this exercise is to encourage creative programming within a limited timeframe rather than endless playlists;
  • Please do not include more than one film from any one streaming platform.

You can find below the list of all programmes already submitted (the most recently-submitted one appears on top).


Submitted Programmes

Andrew Reichel - NYU-MIAP
Interludes (89 min)
For my take on the FIAF programming game, I have chosen to take a globetrotting approach. Most of these films are experimental in nature, but some moreso than others. The common theme (besides a showcase of my auteurist preferences) seems to be centered around music and sound in all its forms, so I have chosen to entitle this program Interludes. I would generally encourage people to view these films in whatever order they like, although they are listed chronologically. There is also an extended director's cut of this programme that features a larger selection of films: https://letterboxd.com/andr913/list/interludes-a-programming-exercise/
Films:
1924 (16 min)
MoMA
1930 (26 min)
Cinémathèque Française
1934 (7 min)
George Eastman House
1953 (13 min)
Library of Congress
1964 (6 min)
Cinematheque Brasileira
1965 (12 min)
Academy Film Archive
1968 (6 min)
Yale Film Archive
1971 (3 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
CHEUNG Po Ching -
Old Hong Kong In Foreign Eyes (19 min)
Films recording Hong Kong city life occurred as early as the late 19th Century, most made by foreigners for commercial or educational purposes. That was a time when foreign travel was uncommon and travelogue documentaries provided a window to the East. Many of these films lavish laudatory terms like 'great', 'beautiful' or 'wonder' on Hong Kong, inspiring in foreign audiences the curiosity and imagination of the exotic. The earliest documentary in our collection is The Edison Shorts, made in 1898 by Edison Company, capturing images of the Street Scenes in Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Wharf and Shanghai Street. Made in the 1930s, Haunt of Romance: Hong Kong Travelogue (1935) and Hong Kong Gateway to China (1938) make records of Victoria Harbour, Repulse Bay, Victoria Peak and Happy Valley as well as landmarks like the Former Kowloon-Canton Railway Clock Tower, the Cenotaph and the Old Supreme Court. In 1936, the Hong Kong Tourist Association also produced Views of Hong Kong—with a budget of HKD3,000, then a considerable amount—promoting sightseeing spots to attract visitors. In the 1950s, Denis Bray, while living in Hong Kong serving first as District Commissioner in the New Territories and later as Secretary for Home Affairs, made films of the New Territories. He recorded the land not with curiosity but with an eye of a resident, capturing images different from travelogues or commercial documentaries.
Films:
1898 (4 min)
Hong Kong Film Archive (Special thanks to Mr Denis Bray)
1935 (4 min)
Hong Kong Film Archive (Special thanks to Mr Denis Bray)
1938 (5 min)
Hong Kong Film Archive (Special thanks to Mr Denis Bray)
1936 (6 min)
Hong Kong Film Archive (Special thanks to Mr Denis Bray)
Ester Bibi Asgeirsdottir - The National Film Archive of Iceland
One's lust, another's, disgust? (47 min)
The unsatiable hunger of media, filmmakers and their audiences for shocks and disgusting images and stories is a worthy study. Can one’s delicacy be disgusting to others? Disgust is a strong primal emotion intended to protect us from harm. An emotion so primal that it can easily be manipulated. Disgust of the unknown, disgust of the new, the strange, the alien. Could racism be a child of disgust? “Jacques Chirac’s in/famous “le bruit et l’odeur” - the noise and the smell, illustrates how feelings of disgust can be shared and become a collective feeling about “the others”.
Films:
1980 (20 min)
cinematheque francaise
1955 (10 min)
National Film Archive of Iceland
1934 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Iceland
Olivia Buning - Eye Filmmuseum
DISGUST – Colonial liberties (57 min)
This program presents testimonies, which give evidence of colonial injustice and abuse against indigenous peoples, enslaved Africans and their descendants.
Films:
0000 (5 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
2021 (13 min)
Loading Docs New Zealand
1898 (1 min)
Indigenous Film Archive / Library of Congres
0000 (9 min)
Eyefletch
Ona Kotryna Dikaviciute - Meno avilys
Identity, Morality, Disgust (54 min)
Films in this program explore disgust as a social emotion, looking at ways in which it contributes to the construction of meanings regarding our perception of self, social situations, and the realities we live in. Gossip, prejudice, stereotypes, and taboos are all connected to this complex emotion and collaboratively shape the boundaries of morality and socially acceptable behavior. The program presents portraits of people: old ladies passionately gossiping about their neighbors; a man contemplating alternative life scenarios; a student increasingly questioning the standards imposed on her by her community; an artist who does not conform to society's norms, living the life of a recluse. All of these people fall on a spectrum, from those who follow (and impose) the rules to those who disregard them altogether, perhaps even using disgust as an impulse for change.
Films:
1976 (2 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
2007 (2 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1967 (14 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1971 (36 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Catalina Giordano - Elías Querejeta Zine Eskola
Everything you touch becomes something else (44 min)
John Berger suggests in his text “On Drawing”, that creating images is transforming appearances and disappearances into a game more serious than life. In these movies, we can glimpse a little bit of this joyful idea, of this playful way of grasping something to convert it into something else; action which becomes a pleasure to whom performs these effects. A woman develops a photograph, a virgin appears on camera by trick, a gardener creates his floral compositions, a filmmaker paints over film. As we, humans, create and feel bliss by giving shape to what surrounds us, nature just happens next to us. And if we stop for a while, we can hear the music compositions of the birds.
Films:
ca. 1926 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional de México
1927 (6 min)
George Eastman Museum
1959 (16 min)
Cinematheque Française
1935 (4 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1970 (17 min)
The Irish Film Institute
Diana Cipriano - British Film Institute
Resist and revolt! (73 min)
In the face of injustice, oppression, and inequality all that's left are our voices, our anger, our unwillingness to give up, our refusal to accept the inacceptable and, by noise and by numbers, changing an inacceptable present into a liveable future. This programme looks at three documents of about the fight against oppression and discrimination.
Matthieu Grimault - Cinémathèque française
Joy is serious (54 min)
Creation, celebration, play, love... Strong emotion, expression of joy has given to cinema many masterpieces. Simple emotion, one shall not forget its expression has always inspired film creator of all kind. let's have a quick look to how has been treated on film different kind of enjoyment. Enjoy !
Films:
1970 (13 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1897 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1938 (8 min)
KAVI (Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti )
1966 (8 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1963 (10 min)
George Eastman Museum
1970 (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1932 (13 min)
Yale Film Archive
Sebastian Lindvall - The Swedish Film Institute
FOMO: Fear of Missing Out (29 min)
FOMO – the acronym for "fear of missing out" – was coined and popularized in 2004. Although the expression is based on serious research on fears of regret and feelings of anxiety, it's nowadays mostly used in lighter contexts. You don't have a ticket to the Taylor Swift concert tonight? FOMO! Sick in bed and can't go to the 70 mm screening of “Apocalypse Now” this Friday? FOMO! Cinematic depictions of festivities can remind you of all the things you've missed out on. At the same time, cinema makes it possible for you to take part of the past – even things that happened long before you were born. Let cinema defeat the feeling of FOMO.
Films:
1909 (6 min)
BFI National Archive
1964 (6 min)
The Swedish Film Institute
1958 (17 min)
George Eastman Museum
Pia Watzenboeck - Arthouse Commercio Movie AG
ANGER (78 min)
The programme deals with the emotion anger and focususes on it`s huge political dimension. Questions of social responsibility, prevention and the consequences of social anger are addressed to the spectator.
Films:
1994 (24 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek Berlin
1954 (7 min)
Filmarchives Online
1929 (15 min)
Japanese Animated Film Classics
1954 (32 min)
Israel Film Archive
Valentina Carnali - University of Bologna
The toys uprising: between creativity and critics (48 min)
“This story brings our thoughts to birth and encourages us to distinguish between illusion and reality”. This series of short movies would like to play with the theme of fear and power, solely showing animated movies. The unusual chiasmus between the seemingly childish aesthetic and the critical contents of each of these short movies, help us explore the role of fear as a tool for control and power, and creativity and irony as a tool to deconstruct introjected social structures.
Films:
1973 (10 min)
ACMI Collection
1976 (7 min)
ACMI Collection
1946 (2 min)
NFA - Národní Filmový Archiv
1965 (19 min)
NFA - Národní Filmový Archiv
1972 (10 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre - YouTube Channel
Clara Thielemann - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia - Cineteca Nazionale
Joy, LLC (31 min)
In a stressful world the desire for small moments of joy becomes a crucial need to satisfy. And where there is a desire and demand, capitalism will offer a supply. So why not let joy become a product we can buy? This program welcomes you into the surreal world of emotional advertising and consumerism. These types of commercials often use symbolism and imagery to evoke a feeling rather than focusing on the factual details of the products or services being advertised. Ranging from the late 40s to the 80s this selection gives an insight on television and cinema commercials... and might end with a little wake-up call.
Films:
1949 (2 min)
The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1953 (2 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
195? (3 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1965 (1 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti
1969 (1 min)
Australian Screen - National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1970s (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1982 (1 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1960 (20 min)
BFI National Archive
Bangun Kuncoro Haryo Aryanto - Ministry Of Education, Culture, Research, and Technology. Republic of Indonesia
Does the Motion Picture Rating system work? (69 min)
When watching movies, we are often faced with ratings information such as Children, Adults, R13, R17, etc. However, how is it implemented in everyday life? Does a young child watch according to the allowed rating for them? Do parents always self-censor all their child's viewing? I don't think so. Parenting activities are not just about taking care of children; it can be difficult to always guide children regarding what they watch. In this festival, interaction in families is expected, where parents and children can interact while watching films. The family's function itself is the smallest and most intimate form of social intervention in education and morality. Instilling moral values ​​is certainly important from an early age. Films, as a medium that transmits moral messages, are considered very effective as a learning tool. Due to busy schedules, interaction between parents and children may become increasingly rare. Therefore, this festival will bring parents and their children together to watch films with moral and social themes, allowing parents to explain the content of the films to their children. On the other hand, the implementation of film rating rules becomes more appropriate.
Films:
1931 (11 min)
the Ministry of Education Japan
1990 (10 min)
Studio Kyivnaukfilm
1955 (8 min)
Thai Film Archive
1983 (15 min)
British Film Institute
Robby Trippaers - KU Leuven / University of Antwerp
Different kinds of fear (89 min)
Fear, an universal human emotion with numerous shapes and sizes. Through a selection of features, spanning from the 1940s until the 2010s, this program shows different kinds of fear and how they are present throughout history. So we can reflect, contextualize and discuss the role of fear in our own time.
Films:
1942 (11 min)
Indiana University
1975 (53 min)
EYE Filmmuseum Amsterdam
2013 (13 min)
Irish Film Institute
? (12 min)
Australian Center for the Moving Image
Maya Labiadh - Cinemathèque royale de Belgique - INA Sup
Silent Anger (La colère silencieuse) (50 min)
*Dans la colère, rien ne convient mieux que le silence.-Sappho* Il vous serez difficile de concevoir une foule en colère dans le silence, une masse d'individus exprimant son mécontentement sans recourir au tumulte des vociférations. Cependant, le médium cinématographique a souvent saisi ces moments cruciaux d'insurrection et de colères collectives, les immortalisant sans le don de la parole ou parfois là où le son s'est éteint au fil du temps. Dans cette sélection de films d'archives soigneusement choisie, nous sommes confrontés à une juxtaposition captivante : une colère manifeste, mais dépourvue de son. Les cris passionnés, les discours enflammés et les soulèvements persistants, même en l'absence de leur sonorité originelle, constituent un élément cinématographique formel d'une spécificité remarquable, indépendamment de leur contenu idéologique, géographique ou temporelle. Il devient évident que, dans ces moments, les mots importent peu en comparaison du choix délibéré de capturer les colères politiques collectives qui transcendent le langage. C'est là que nous atteignons le cœur de l'imaginaire de la révolte, le frisson palpable qui galvanise les foules et délecte le spectateur. Le corpus cinématographique est donc le plus diversifié possible, chaque séquence témoigne d'une époque et d'un lieu différents, révélant les nuances de la protestation muette. Notre voyage commence en Irlande en 1912, avec une séquence qui, malgré son titre trompeur, dépeint une manifestation nationaliste plutôt qu'une démonstration orangiste. Les foules acclament les Irish National Foresters, fervents défenseurs du nationalisme irlandais. Continuant notre périple, nous plongeons dans le Paris de 1936 lors des manifestations du 1er mai, où des protestataires envahissent la Place de la Bastille et le Bois de Vincennes, laissant une empreinte indélébile sur l'histoire et marquant un tournant dans cette célébration profondément ancrée dans le socialisme. Nous vivons ensuite, par les images, l'effervescence de l'Égypte en 1956, où de jeunes manifestants se heurtent à l'armée lors de l'arrivée des représentants de l'ONU, offrant ainsi une perspective unique sur la tension populaire égyptienne lors de la crise du canal de Suez. Notre immersion se poursuit au cœur des manifestations d'agriculteurs bretons en 1962, avec des cortèges de tracteurs, des discussions animées et des revendications inscrites sur les murs, illustrant les luttes rurales de cette époque cruciale. Ensuite, revivant les journées historiques de janvier 1960 à Alger, nous assistons aux manifestants criant "Algérie française", brisant les barrages de sécurité devant le monument aux morts. Notre voyage s'achève à Bologne en 1967, où une manifestation pacifiste pour la paix au Vietnam envahit la Piazza Maggiore, illustrant la puissance viscérale de la protestation sans mots, devenue depuis un élément crucial des colères pacifiques telles que les marches silencieuses ou les minutes de silence. Ainsi, ces moments révèlent la puissance évocatrice d'une expression collective qui transcende les frontières du son, dévoilant la véritable intensité de la colère silencieuse capturée par l'œil perspicace de la caméra.
Films:
1912 (2 min)
Irish Film Institution
1936 (2 min)
Ciné-archive
1962 (12 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1967 (24 min)
Cineteca di Bologna Film
Rizka Fitri Akbar - Ministry of Culture ,Education ,Research and Techology of the Republic of Indonesia
Women: Hopes and Desires (86 min)
Bringing attention to the hardships and sacrifices women make in the pursuit of equal rights and political representation ("Elles" ), as well as empowering other women to take up the cause of political and social injustice ( "Gloria"). However, there is still a struggle in their minds between hope and want, which frequently arises in their minds because of a need they have for something they have imagined ( "Shoes"). This program was created to represent the struggle of women who not only fight for their rights but also for their position in society and the family. The sense of uncertainty and the tendency to understand and act on the situation actually creates fear for them.
Films:
1966 (22 min)
Cinematheque Francaise
1984 (14 min)
NFSA Australia
1916 (50 min)
Eye Film Museun
Magnus Rosborn - The Swedish Film Institute
Scenes from a Marriage – the Funny Silent Anger Edition (84 min)
The goal of getting married is such a well-represented and central plot element in movies, that not many would question the concept of boy meets girl and – without hardly knowing each other – they decide to get married within a running time of less than 90 minutes. But how desirable is this rapidly implemented and traditionally life-long binding social institution? If the nature of marriages is cinematically commented after they have been entered, it is seldom the happiness of the couples that is being shown. Instead, it is the problems of marriages that predominates the depictions. Film history is full of stories of unhappy marriages where the partners loathe, hurt and try to destroy each other. The frustration and anger that the characters feel towards their partner that they promised to love for life can either be depicted tragically or comically. With this curated compilation film program, I'm focusing on the comedy aspect of anger within marriages in five various short films from the silent era. In the animated Norwegian chocolate commercial [Rollo sjokolade-reklame] (1925) a medieval or viking era warrior shows his anger in different situation, but when married to the king’s daughter he finally finds an equal with just as much of a temperament. The plot in the Danish comedy Den kære Husfred (1921) deals with two rivaling families living in one apartment building where the wives hate each other while their husbands try to avoid any conflict. The attempt to highlight preconceived differences between men and women is perhaps the most common way to build comic situations around anger in marriage. In the Finnish comedy Kun isällä on hammassärky (1922) the husband and wife both deal with their toothache in two very different ways, and in the Swedish Lev livet leende (1921) the wife tries to tame her choleric husband by getting him to read Douglas Fairbank’s book “Laugh and Live”. An odd example of a battle of the sexes is found in the futuristic American comedy What’s The World Coming To? (1926). There the traditional stereotypical gender differences in a marriage are turned totally upside down.
Films:
1925 (3 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1921 (15 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut/The Danish Film Institute
1922 (19 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1921 (25 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet/The Swedish Film Institute
1926 (22 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
Georgia Dee - British Film Institute
The Fear Factory: Propaganda in Wartime Animation (61 min)
The machinery of war is not limited to the battlefield; it invades our lives through the media we consume. Across decades and continents, most notably throughout the first half of the twentieth century, propaganda has been used in film to incite fear in the mind of the viewer. Similarities weave their way through this selection of wartime animations: exaggerated caricatures, anthropomorphisation of political figures, and monstrous personifications of countries spark discomfort and encourage fear, forming a catalyst for control. Chronological and stylistic differences aside, these films can be viewed in the context of modern warfare and the current global political climate. Methods of fearmongering have been adapted to capitalise on our ever-shifting media landscape, yet the sentiment remains the same; a singular narrative is pushed, thus encouraging fear to grow in the shadows.
Films:
1943 (8 min)
British Film Institute
1916 (10 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1932 (28 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1929 (6 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1916 (9 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Sandra Ladwig - BUNDESARCHIV
Keep going – or: awaiting the unconscious (85 min)
It mostly starts when something unexpected (and maybe not yet defined) interrupts the ordinary daily life. Sometimes it might be the well-known that frightens us. Fear can be tangible and object-related, but fear is also based on traumatic experiences and comprises the imagination of overwhelming moments of disruption. Losing control over one’s own physical or emotional integrity is the driving force of fear – provoking various kinds of reactions on the individual and societal level. Cinematic experiences create and activate this state of mind (and body). This programme includes short fiction films about the uncanny and the extraterrestrial, transitions from human to animal and back, documentary views of eerie creatures and of intimidating initiation rites, animation on hygiene and the challenges of daily life, and promotional films about the local emergency control organization and the meaning of maintaining gas lanterns as part of ensuring the public safety and order in the city.
Films:
1953/1957 (9 min)
Stadtmuseum Aarau
1956 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland
1975 (7 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1980 (18 min)
Irish Film Institute
1926 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1928 (14 min)
La cinémathèque française
1972 (13 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Maciej Bartczak - National Film Archive - Audiovisual Institute
Dissonant Mosaic: A Cinematic Exploration of Revulsion (19 min)
This series of films blends an array of seemingly random yet disconcerting visuals, utilizing unsettling sounds, degrading film reels, and perturbing imagery. Functioning as a mosaic of both sights and sounds, the program is deliberately designed to evoke a sense of discomfort and queasiness in its audience.
Films:
1958 (3 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1908 (2 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1967 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1939 (8 min)
Library of Congress
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
no data (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Clara Giruzzi - NATIONAL FILM INSTITUTE HUNGARY - FILM ARCHIVE
Fêtes urbaines (57 min)
A travers les films d’archives, une exploration des fêtes urbaines. Les fêtes urbaines collectives publiques, sont-elles toujours, ou uniquement, l’expression de la joie ? Populaires ou bourgeoises, en petit ou en grand nombre, dans l’espace public, les fêtes urbaines peuvent célébrer des valeurs patriotiques : processions militaires, fêtes nationales ; ou encore, des valeurs religieuses. Fêtes étudiantes, fêtes populaires, spontanées ou organisées, carnaval ou rassemblement, elles peuvent aussi prendre la forme de manifestations, expressions contestataires. Expression du rassemblement, ou de la division du peuple ? Liberté, ou contrainte ? Joie, ou colère ?
Films:
1909 (5 min)
Danish Film Institute
1946 (10 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1954 (10 min)
ACMI Collection
1953 (19 min)
National Library of Scotland
1933 (3 min)
Cinématheque francaise
1950 (2 min)
Cinématheque suisse
1949 (8 min)
Cineteca di Bologna
Julie Dragon - La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Colère 68 (95 min)
« Le peuple au plus ardent de sa colère est pareil à un feu trop vif pour être éteint. » (Euripide) 1968, révoltes, indignations, revendications… Peuples en colère… Année de contestation générale des valeurs et des pouvoirs établis.
Films:
1968 (3 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1968 (1 min)
Cinémathèque française
1968 (14 min)
Cinémathèque française
1968 (35 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1968 (1 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1968 (1 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1968 (6 min)
Library of Congress
1968 (1 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1968 (1 min)
Nemzeti Filmintézet Magyarország - Filmarchívum / National Film Institute Hungary - Film Archive
1968 (8 min)
The Bay Area TV Archives
1968 (2 min)
https://archive.org/details/NINA_SIMONE_Dont_Let_Me_Be_Misunderstood_1968
Inés Rakosnik - University of Amsterdam
Everywhere, or the perfect place for an accident (47 min)
First in the hands of the church, later in the hands of governments, fear has been used as a suggestive device for controlling the behavior of entire civilizations since the beginning of times, whether for the sake of life or to the detriment of it. It is no wonder that fear’s swaying ability would find its paroxysm in film, a promising medium to portray not only reality as it is but also —and most importantly— as it could potentially be. The object of this fear has taken many shapes and forms. From the 20th century to the present day, nothing seems to scare us more than unpredictable events. The unforeseeable paralyzes some, and fatal accidents shake us all to the core, affecting our brains more radically than if death had come naturally (expectedly!) through the door. Interestingly enough, the second half of the 20th century saw the rise of safety protocols imbuing every aspect of citizens’ lives. From the households to the factories, passing through the streets, this prevention fever was present everywhere and throve in film, where compelling visual images could be dubbed with authoritative voices that brought to the fore the probability of accidents at the risk of triggering a fight-or-flight response.
Films:
1959 (12 min)
NFSA Films
1960 (9 min)
ACMI Collection
1965 (17 min)
Archivio Nazionale Cinema Impresa
Noémie - Cinémathèque française
Ménagères en colère! (57 min)
A la fois mère et épouse, la femme au foyer idéale des années 1950 se voit cantonnée uniquement aux tâches ménagères (cuisine, ménage, lessive, etc) tout en s’occupant des enfants et bien sûr de son époux. Les publicitaires prétendent qu’il est facile de rendre heureuse n’importe quelle femme en lui offrant de beaux vêtements ou en lui proposant de l’électroménager afin de lui faciliter sa vie quotidienne. Ces publicités très genrées contribuent à entretenir une panoplie de stéréotypes inscrits dans une époque et aujourd’hui désuets. Au cours de ces films on croise une femme dont la charge mentale est tellement forte qu’elle trouve à peine le temps de dormir. Avec le film de Mark Rappaport un basculement s’opère, cela passe par une introspection grâce à ce jeu de miroir, un cri, une sorte d’implosion de la femme prise au piège dans son quotidien. Cette programmation met en évidence le combat des femmes pour avoir leur indépendance, pour travailler et pour être reconnue comme étant l’égal de leurs homologues masculins.
Films:
1930 (7 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1950-1968 (20 min)
Eye film museum
2014 (11 min)
Cinémathèque française
1975 (14 min)
BFI
Nabil Djedouani - Archives Numériques du Cinéma Algérien
Power to the people/Voices of Empowerment (82 min)
Des premières mobilisations aux chemins de l'exil, trajectoires dissidentes des membres du Black Panthers Party sous le regard d'apprentis cinéastes, passagers clandestins de l'Histoire en train de s'écrire.
Films:
1970 (26 min)
Cinémathèque française
1968 (31 min)
Academy Collections
1970 (25 min)
filmportal.de
Isabella Piccinini - Cineteca Nazionale (Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia)
TO FACE THE UNKNOWN (69 min)
In a world where conflicts and climate change threaten our existence daily, fear, and specifically fear for our future, is a common struggle we all face. What is more mysterious and disturbing than a time yet to come? The unknown can be extremely distressing (“Der Luftkrieg der Zukunft”, “La paura degli aeromobili nemici”, “Ever Been Had”) but it can also hold hope for those who are brave enough to fight back with a spirit of resistance to affirm one’s right to live (“Denmark Fights for Freedom”, “Mor'vran. La Mer des corbeaux”) and who have faith in change (“Don’t tell me I can’t”). This program, featuring a mix of genres such as early cinema comedy series, science fiction, animation, and documentary cinema, as well as reflecting on the theme of fear of tomorrow, also aims to investigate the different human reactions to the fear of change and by starting with a group of films works that depict a stark (or even catastrophic) perspective, it concludes with a message of hope for the creation of a better future and the beginning of a new life.
Films:
1909 (7 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
1915 (16 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1917 (9 min)
BFI National Archive
1944 (9 min)
The Danish Film Institute (Det Danske Filminstitut)
1930 (25 min)
Cinémathèque Française
2005 (3 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Caterina Carmignani - Fondazione Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia - Cineteca Nazionale
Never a Joy! (61 min)
“Never a Joy” is a maccheronic English translation of the Italian expression 'Mai una gioia', which can be more accurately translated as "Always a hassle". “Never a joy” is the ironic and sarcastic expression with which we usually classify situations in life that, unfortunately, always go wrong, when at the umpteenth attempt we fail or when our best hopes are punctually dashed. In short, 'never a joy' is meant to smile or find the funny side to life's setbacks. An expression that originated in youth slang and is mainly used by young people, with the advent of social networks this state of mind has now become commonly used: we write it in chats, it is the undisputed protagonist of memes and posts, there are even pages dedicated to this expression and of course there is no shortage of hashtags. In short, the Murphy's law of Gen Z. But the roots of this existential mood go back to ancient times and cultures: from the Greek and Latin comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus to those of the Italian Commedia dell'arte and Moliere, to the comedies of the early film industry. Who better in fact than Andreé Deed, Larry Semon, Stan Laurel and Fatty Arbuckle, with their awkward misadventures punctuated by pacing and excitement, can bring a smile out of us even in the face of spanking or purging! This interpretation of this existential theme could be the common thread to bring a the youngest closer to the world of slapstick films and more generally silent movies.
Films:
1918 (16 min)
Fondazione Cineteca Italiana
1924 (23 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1919 (5 min)
Library of Congress
1910 (11 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1912 (6 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Anupma Jai Shanker - Freelance (self-employed)
"All Wi Doin Is Defendin...": Portraits of Race-related Anger in Post WWII Britain (90 min)
A collection of three docs curated from the BFI National Archive that not only portray and provoke the raw
Films:
1979 (44 min)
British Film Institute
1981 (34 min)
British Film Institute
1980 (12 min)
British Film Institute
Misha Anhelush - British Film Institute
Joy of sport (44 min)
Sport events are real joy, pleasure and an entertainment which unite people globally. Across all the continents and nations, no matter of profession, ethnicity, title, age and gender - sport events are giving people some of best emotions and memories. Well documented on film since very early days with people excited on both sides - participants and viewers always cherished the occasion. And also, through endless creativity of animation, presented to children and adults with various formats, vibrant colours, unique characters and unforgettable laughter.
Films:
1920 (12 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1932 (9 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1970 (17 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1968 (2 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1901 (4 min)
BFI National archive
Nell Twanmu - Taiwan Film and Audiovisual Institute
Do you Hear the People Yelling? (76 min)
Fighting for the rights is the action of anger, form overthrow the regimes, protests against the authorities or social status and strikes over personal welfare, since the camera is able to record, there is the images. The program showcases these acts of anger in different regions and eras in the form of 3 pairs. The "Great Strike" documenting the one of Australia’s largest industrial conflicts, while "Mutt and Jeff: On Strike" is the rebellion of animation characters, both of these events ending with shaking hand with the boss (quite irritating from the aspect of a present viewer). The "Faces of the 1848 revolution and freedom struggle in Hungarian Film" and "They Will Never Forget" in Thailand, each experienced a brief period of successful transformation after protests, but ultimately fell short due to the overpowering force of another entity. "UCLA Protest" and "Woman Fight Back" form a duo fighting for fairness, are more towards personal narratives and intimacy compared to the other pairs. While the outcomes remain uncertain, the fervent desire for justice and fair treatment is vivid and genuine.
Films:
1917 (16 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1920 (7 min)
NFPF National Film Presevation Fundation(USA)
unknow (14 min)
National Film Institute Hungary
1977 (34 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1978 (2 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1980s (3 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
Joana de Sousa - Cinemateca Portuguesa - Museu do Cinema
The dreams of soft Spring nights (57 min)
“On soft Spring nights I’ll stand in the yard under the stars ― Something good will come out of all things yet ― And it will be golden and eternal just like that ― There’s no need to say another word.” Jack Kerouac, Big Sur
Films:
1923 (12 min)
The Museum of Modern Art - Department of Film
1911 (14 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1953 (14 min)
Library of Congress
1959 (17 min)
La Cinémathèque française
Svetlana Furman - HoloFlow
JOY (59 min)
Joy is the basic feeling/emotion for all humans. Joy is connected to everything we do. Sometimes we dont even realise that create joy even by most simple actions. Joy has been documented on film since its begining and it is extremely interesting to follow its path and its reflection in the faces of children and adults.
Films:
1936 (59 min)
FINA
Alix Prada - Centre national de la cinématographie (CNC) - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
Déjà-là de la révolte (75 min)
Dans son ciné-tract nommé "Joachim Gatti, Variation de lumière" (2009), le réalisateur Jean-Marie Straub exprime sa solidarité avec ce jeune homme, défiguré au cours d’une manifestation par le tir d’un « lanceur de balles de défense ». Le dispositif, consiste en un plan fixe et rapproché sur un portrait photographique de Joachim Gatti, accrochée à un mur de pierre. À ce dispositif, s’adjoint un écosystème sonore triple. Ce sont d’abord les bruits de la ville, rejoints par l’ombre projetée d’une plante et la voix du réalisateur, lisant un extrait du "Discours sur l'origine et les fondements de l'inégalité parmi les hommes" (1755). C’est enfin l’expression lapidaire d’une colère dirigée à l’encontre des violences policières. La colère individuelle s’y incarne comme le relais d’une autre, collective, partagée. C’est cette même idée d’une colère qui traverse les différentes voix et luttes, que j’ai souhaité exprimer à travers cette programmation intitulée « Déjà-là de la révolte ». Elle fait se croiser, cheminer ensemble, les protestations individuelles et collectives de multiples voix : celles des enfants, des adolescents, des ouvriers, des personnes racisées et des minorités sexuelles, selon différentes approches esthétiques et de genres (poésie et animation, fiction, actualités et documentaires). Afin de conserver la notion de transversalité et de laisser au spectateur un espace de libre association des œuvres proposées, elle ne respecte pas d’ordre chronologique spécifique.
Films:
1968 (16 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse (Mémoire filmique Pyrénées-Méditerranée)
1970 (12 min)
Library of Congress (The National Screening Room)
1995 (7 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet (Filmarkivet.se)
1976 (10 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale (Chaîne YouTube Documentalia)
1972 (2 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina (Digital Collections)
1917-1924 (3 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket - National Library of Norway (base de données en ligne de l'institution)
1976 (24 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne (base documentaire de l'institution)
1916 (1 min)
British Film Institute National Archive (Chaîne Youtube de l'institution)
Zoé Richard - Cinémathèque française - INAsup
Women's Rights in the Harvest (87 min)
Women farmers have long done double duty without any professional recognition. Simply seen as the farmer’s wife, they still handled many tasks in the fields, as well as taking care of the house and children. This double workload is shown very early on in the films presented here, that mainly focuses on European women. The first is a Belgian propaganda film from 1923, which surprisingly, clearly shows the double burden of women workers. The second film is a documentary from 1931 that takes us to the village of Cornova, in what is now Moldova, in a pre-mechanisation era. Women work with hay or help with grape picking. One is busy at a weaving machine, while another tends the fire as men sharpen their metal tools. Another beautiful scene is shown in the third film, which is a British newsreel from 1916 showing women at work in the fields during World War I. One of them leads a horse plowing the field. The fourth film is from Denmark and shows how farming work changed with modernisation of farms, mechanisation, and the emergence of co-operatives. While the farming profession is undergoing major change, the woman farmer is still regarded as the farmer’s wife and looks after the chickens in the same way as the children. The final film offers a broader overview of the status of women in the mid-twentieth century. Commissioned by the Swiss trade union in 1958, it calls for a better division of tasks between men and women. It also addresses the developments brought about by mechanisation in industry, and calls for equal pay between men and women. This programme offers an overview of the different tasks performed by women farmers, and the changes they went through between the early and mid-twentieth century. Beyond the aesthetic pleasure of rediscovering these stunning images, it seeks to remind us of the role played by these women in the development of agriculture, and to reflect on the struggles we must continue to wage.
Films:
1923 (10 min)
Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique
1931 (36 min)
Arhiva Naţională de Filme – Cinemateca Română
1916 (1 min)
British Film Institute
1952 (23 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1958 (17 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
Dominika Suder - National Film Archive - Audiovisual Institute
Repulsive projections (45 min)
Disgust is an emotion that signals us that the object, person or situation we are in may be potentially harmful to our health. Repulsion is associated with strong vegetative stimulation, protects against contact with another person, animal, object or introduction into the body of a substance that may be life-threatening.
Films:
1919 (2 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1949 (11 min)
NFSA Films
1986 (3 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1942 (11 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
2001 (3 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1913 (7 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1934 (2 min)
National Film Institute Hungary - Film Archive
1970-1980 (2 min)
BFI
Samantha Glaraga -
Against A Fathers Smile (72 min)
In this program, “Against A Father’s Smile”, we are shown two men brought to the height of their strength, vulnerability, and capability to love. There are forces in these films that deal these men a great injustice. Both are condemned to death. Both have daughters who they love very much. So, when thinking about ‘disgust’, my instincts moved me towards injustice. A strong sense of disgust can stem from a deep feeling of dissatisfaction with the world and its attempts at justice. Thus, cynicism is born. How do we reconcile with the nuances of another’s morality? The attempt of this program is to combat this surge of contempt, with a spirit of hope.
Films:
1909 (10 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1926 (62 min)
Cinémathèque Française
Sébastien Roussel - Cinémathèque française
Body Horror (49 min)
“Le corps est la source de l'horreur chez les êtres humains. C'est le corps qui vieillit ; c'est le corps qui meurt.” David Cronenberg. On a souvent du dégoût pour tout ce qui, dans notre corps, nous ramène à notre animalité et notre condition de mortel : les maladies, le vieillissement, la chair blessée, les fluides et déchets corporels (poils, odeurs, sueur). Pour contourner ce dégoût, on a inventé l’hygiène afin de gommer ces attributs qui nous ramenaient à nos instincts primaires et à notre fragile mortalité. S’il peut constituer un véritable signal d’alerte contre les dangers, le dégoût produit ici un clivage social fondé sur l’exclusion des plus faibles. Santé, longévité, opposés à la maladie et l’infirmité. Corps jeunes et vigoureux d’un côté, les autres - corps trop vieux, malades, handicapés - sont ceux qui dégoutent. Le dégoût vient tracer une limite entre soi et l’autre.
Films:
1976 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1920 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1959 (2 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1920 (13 min)
ECPAD - Établissement de Communication et de Production Audiovisuelle de la Défense
1963 (1 min)
Jerusalem Cinematheque - Israel Film Archive
1916 (7 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1971 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Nabil Aouad -
Dualities (71 min)
“Thus, we come to a conclusion that is both very simple and very complex, namely, that there are things that people do to each other, what I can do to somebody else, what somebody else can do to me, and it can be fear, extreme terror, torture, all the way up to total love. Good and evil don’t exist in heaven or hell, they exist between people. The cinema exists for showing that, too. It exists so we can see what’s not working, where the evil lies between you and I, between me and somebody else, so we can see the evil in society and, so we can search for the good.” -‘A Closed Door That Leaves us Guessing’
Films:
1911 (15 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1964 (12 min)
Academy Film Archive
1934 (44 min)
Cinémathèque Française
Maria Sole Colombo - CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
What's Up, Doc? - Mad Doctors on Silver Screen (72 min)
When it comes to reflecting on “fear” and its representation on the silver screen, one cannot help but think about horror movies. In this programme, I focus on one of the most recurrent and long-lasting trope of this genre, the "mad doctor". This archetype, who inspired unforgettable characters such as Dr. Caligari, perfectly embodies the tragedy of Prometheus – the man driven to madness or catastrophe by his burning ambition. The programme aims to investigate this figure by considering a diverse range of audiovisual sources, including both silent and sound pictures, fiction and documentary films, professional and amateur cinema. The first title of the programme is "Prodigi della scienza" (Enrico Franceschelli, 1955), an educational film that triumphantly describes the amazing discoveries of science. The dark side of medicine begins to unveil in "Mental Hygiene Authority" (1961), a silent documentary on life in a mental institution in Australia. The movie carries a subliminal sense of anxiety, and doctors lose their usual role as heroic figures. The programme continues with "La Folie du docteur Tube" (Abel Gance, 1915): for the french metteur en scène, the science lab and its typical iconography is the ideal set for a féerie-like story. The film is meant to inspire laughter, but its end has hallucinatory and disturbing traits. Gance’s Dr. Tube is then followed by the “mad doctor” par excellence, Dr. Frankenstein. In this programme, I included the first ever adaptation of the novel, "Frankenstein" (J. Searle Dawley, 1910), an outstanding work containing visual representations of true horror. As an ironic counterpart to Shelley’s sinister vision, two doctors optimistically describe the conditions of an unknown patient in "Medicina, Hospital de Palo Alto" (1968). The programme’s last piece is "Robot Three" (Enrico Cocozza, 1951), an amateur film loosely based on "Frankenstein". This movie is a fascinating experiment, combining a naïve Roger Corman’s like aesthetics and intellectual references to Fritz Lang’s "Metropolis". The scientific equipment used by Cocozza’s "mad doctor" is surprisingly similar to the one showcased in "Prodogi della scienza", the very first title in the programme.
Films:
1955 (8 min)
European Film Gateway (Istituto Luce – Cinecittà Collection)
1961 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1915 (14 min)
Cinémathèque française
1910 (13 min)
Library of Congress
1951 (25 min)
National Library of Scotland
Yaoting Zhang - Universidade Lusófona
Look Out! The Airship Casts Its Shadow (121 min)
Airships, first invented as dirigible balloons in the late 18th century, have always been associated with futuristic ambitions and imagination, much like cinema. Non-fictional archival footages capture numerous fascinating historical moments of airships, illustrating their takeoffs and surveillance of the Earth. The colossal size of the airship always sharply contrasts with the diminutive human spectators on the ground, its shadow casting over dodging individuals with open mouths gazing skyward. Floating against an urban landscape, airships can imply roles as invaders from another world. They also announce a territory newly occupied by specific individuals, either from the upper class or possessing special powers. In addition to airships' primary association with military authority, it is intriguing to note their connection with the terrifying disorder, such as the harbingers from hell in Méliès' short surreal dream "Le dirigeable fantastique" (1905) or steampunk-style pirates represented by the criminal woman, the Italian version of Irma Vep, in the feature-length "Filibus" (1915).
Films:
1912 (4 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1909 (13 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1909 (7 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
1919 (11 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1911 (17 min)
BFI National Archive
1915 (69 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Stefano Darchino - Cinémathèque française
THE JOY OF DANCING! (64 min)
As in the tradition of classical Hollywood musicals, dance can be used to express joy. This one-hour programme draws attention to such a topic, starting with the vivacious jazz dances of a smiling James Berry. Then a silent interlude: a version of Pathé’s 1903 “Marie Antoinette” containing only the happy ‘tableaux’ (the party, the ball). After the famous and colorful Len Lye’s experimental film, the silent “Il carnevale di Nizza” conveys the real energy of carnival, where one can dance and have fun without limits. “Nous, les Gitans” is an ode to gypsies’ wandering restlessness and flamenco with a smile on their faces. The program concludes with an early Japanese animated (sound) film that ends on a joyful dance. [March 1, 2024 FIAF Programming Winter School]
Films:
1958 (17 min)
George Eastman Museum
1903 (5 min)
Filmoteca Española
1936 (4 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1913 (7 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1950 (24 min)
Cinémathèque française (La)
1934 (7 min)
NFC - National Film Archive of Japan
Solenne Bec - Cinémathèque Française
Ça grouille (61 min)
« L’infinitésimal et l’infini étaient si proches… Soudain, je compris que c’étaient les deux extrémités du même concept. L’incroyablement petit et l’incroyablement grand se rencontraient, comme pour former un cercle gigantesque. » (dialogue final de L’homme qui rétrécit, Jack Arnold, 1957). A la manière d’Alice suivant le lapin blanc dans les entrailles de la terre, découvrez un « Pays des Merveilles » où il est avant tout question d’échelle. Ce programme vous propose de vous mettre à hauteur d’insectes pour questionner la suprématie humaine. A la fois sources d’émerveillement et menace ancestrale, la représentation des insectes (et des arachnides) au cinéma va de la fascination à la terreur, en passant par le dégoût. Ils sont en effet partout : on les observe dès les débuts du cinéma (Le Moustique Récalcitrant, 1904) à aujourd’hui, dans les films scientifiques, les documentaires (Microcosmos, 1996), le cinéma d’animation (1001 pattes, 1998), mais aussi dans le cinéma d’horreur (Des Monstres attaquent la ville, 1955 / Vermines, 2023) et fantastique (La Mouche, 1958 et 1986). Les techniques cinématographiques permettent de faire des dimensions un vecteur d’émotions : projetés à échelle humaine par le plan rapproché, les insectes éprouvent notre vulnérabilité. Dézoomés, leur multitude et leur prolifération nous dévore (cf. le travail de Sam Taylor-Wood Sam Taylor-Wood - A Little Death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYka4ouQXqk
Films:
1907 (3 min)
Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique
1904 (1 min)
Filmoteca Española
1910 (3 min)
British Film Institute
1935 (12 min)
CNC - Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1936 (15 min)
ECPAD
1970 (18 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1913 (8 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1988 (1 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia - Australia Screen
Vincent Zeis -
Programme Explorations Universelles et Redécouvertes (PEUR) (76 min)
Le programme présente divers films d’exploration de milieux naturels du monde entier et de leurs faunes et flores. La redécouverte de ces films de différents types et époques peut être motivée par leur intérêt historique et esthétique. Les films dont les proximités thématiques évidentes n’empêchent pas des correspondances de construction plus secrètes peuvent être pris comme exemples de la richesse du cinéma dans son ensemble.
Films:
1944 ? (10 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1910-1912 (19 min)
Meiji Film Archives
1909 (7 min)
Cinematek
1975 (12 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1918 (15 min)
Filmportal.de
Sophie Jourdain - Université Paris 8 - Vincennes - Saint-Denis
Femmes en guerre... Elles aussi se sont engagées (56 min)
Effacées de l’histoire, invisibilisées ou diminuées, les femmes sont des éternelles victimes de guerres qui ont pourtant elles aussi contribué à l’effort de guerre au sein des sociétés. Leur soumission à la gente masculine, leur statut précaire de mineure, leur absence de droit, leur rôle de mère et d’épouse, dont la place est inaliénable au foyer, sont naturels et évidents pour les sociétés patriarcales à travers le monde. Alors, quand la Seconde Guerre Mondiale frappe aux portes de l’Europe, elles sont à nouveau sollicitées (s'inscrivant dans la continuité de leur participation remarquable lors de la Grande Guerre), pour seconder les hommes et combler les manques laissés par ces derniers partis aux combats. Une page décisive de l'histoire s’est ainsi écrite par des femmes aux rôles multiples qui ont été soit mobilisées, soit engagées volontairement. Elles sont ouvrières, sauveteuses, conductrices sanitaires, infirmières, secrétaires, professeures, soldates, espionnes, épouses, mères, victimes résilientes. Ces femmes ont assumé leur rôle traditionnel qu’elles ont par la suite transcendé pour devenir un des des piliers indispensables à la lutte contre l'occupant. Cette programmation de six archives films provenant de différentes collections à travers le monde, met en lumière leurs diverses contributions et les transformations qu'elles ont initiées au sein des sociétés.
Films:
1944 (2 min)
Academy War Film Collection
1941 (16 min)
Archives d'images animées de la Bibliothèque nationale d'Écosse
1944 (1 min)
Archives nationales du film et du son d'Australie
1945 (5 min)
Bibliothèque du Congrès, La salle de projection nationale
1945 (13 min)
Arhiva Natională de Filme – Cinemateca Română - Films sur le European Film Gateway – Ciné-Archives Fonds audiovisuels du PCF mouvement ouvrier et démocratique
Garance Juin - Université Paris 8
Echos en Ruines (64 min)
L’idée principale de cette programmation est de jouer entre le plaisir esthétique des images et leur signification, à travers la représentation audiovisuelle des ruines. Quelle est la limite à la jouissance plastique des images lorsque celles-ci sont significatives d’un contexte de création brutal. Il y a une sensation dans ces images, qu’elles ont été créées dans un but de mémoire. De ce fait, qu’elles appartiennent à leur présent, en offrant un moment dédié à la capture des débris de la disparition, des décombres de guerre, des vestiges antiques. Mais aussi qu’elles sont pensées pour leur futur, comme témoignage du temps qui passe, la présence d’une absence. Le visionnage actuel de ces archives nous donne à voir “l’expérience d’un temps que je ne peux avoir vécu” comme le formule André Habib dans L’Attrait de la ruine. Regarder ces documents aujourd'hui nous transporte directement dans leurs temporalités, de par son contenu visuel mais aussi par les spécificités de leurs médiums. La pellicule, qui est le médium le plus récurrent au sein de la programmation, est un lieu de stockage d’histoire et de mémoire. La matière pelliculaire est elle-même assujettie à la détérioration liée au passage du temps. Ainsi, il y a une matérialité à l’image en tant que telle, qui s’apparente à un imaginaire des ruines. Comme le dit Jean-Luc Godard dans l’Histoire du Cinéma : “Le cinéma n’était pas à l’abri du temps, il était l'abri du temps”.
Films:
1918 (6 min)
ECPAD
1922 (1 min)
IFI
1936 (10 min)
Filmoteca Valencia
1990 (5 min)
IFI
1945 (17 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1983 (21 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
2022 (4 min)
Cinemathèque Francaise
Sage Martin - Université Paris 8
D'une autre planète (58 min)
Dans une interview avec la Tate Modern sur son nouveau livre de photographies d'enfants, Eden and After (2014), Nan Goldin a décrit une histoire qui s'est transmise dans son cercle d'amis proches à propos d'un enfant de quatre ans qui demande à un bébé : « est-ce que tu te souviens de Dieu ? Parce que je commence à oublier - Sa conviction, lors de la création de la collection de photographies, était que les enfants venaient d'une autre planète, plus proches de Dieu et de l'endroit où nous allons quand nous mourons et de l'endroit d'où nous venons. Cela m'est venu à l'esprit en parcourant les différentes archives affiliées à la fiaf et j'ai trouvé mon regard constamment attiré par les images de bébés ou de jeunes enfants. Je me retrouve dans des croyances similaires à celles de Goldin et je me demandais s'ils ont le même genre de pouvoir et d'énergie spirituelle devant la caméra que dans la vie ? Les photographies et les vidéos montrent-elles la véritable énergie des jeunes âges entre la naissance et environ quatre ans, ou est-ce aussi quelque chose qui est entaché par l'homme et ses dispositifs technologiques ? Je voulais voir comment, en tant qu'êtres humains curieux et société en constante recherche, comment avons-nous réussi à documenter les jeunes enfants à travers le temps et de quelle manière trouvons-nous important ou puissant de mettre des enfants à l'écran ? En cela, j'ai pu mettre en place une brève programmation d'environ 60 minutes à partir de diverses sources pour aboutir à un résultat de vidéos de jeunesse simples, légères et joyeuses, mais curieuses à présenter.
Films:
1935 (9 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1952 (1 min)
European Film Gateway
1946 (11 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1993 (2 min)
Australian Screen NFSA
2001 (13 min)
La Cinémathèque Française
1926 (1 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Tainá Bouffay - Université Paris 8
Montagnes en mouvement (65 min)
Les montagnes, en tant que caractéristiques géologiques, existent depuis des millions d'années. Les montagnes évoluent constamment. Patrimoine naturel et culturel, elles forment le paysage matériellement et symboliquement. Des lieux de passage, protectrices des peuples, divinités, les montagnes ont une vie indépendante de celle de l’être humain. Comment le cinéma permet d’aborder visuellement des choses qui sont invisibles, le mouvement des montagnes, et de sensibiliser l’être humain au non-humain ?
Films:
1971 (10 min)
BFI / Screen Archive South East
? (5 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1959 (10 min)
National Library of Scotland
1912 (15 min)
Musée national du cinéma Turin
Breton Yoann - Université de Paris 8
Les résistances anti-nucléaires contre la politique coloniale nucléaire française dans le Pacifique (1963 - 1998) (56 min)
Cette programmation retrace l’histoire de mouvements écologistes, nés en réponse à la campagne nucléaire du gouvernement français en Polynésie entre 1963 et 1998. Dans un contexte politique de colonisation et de course à l’armement nucléaire des années 1960, le gouvernement français décide, en 1963, d’implanter le Centre d’Expérimentation du Pacifique (CEP) en plein cœur de Tahiti pour remplacer les sites d'essais du Sahara algérien. L’occupation militaire et les infrastructures nucléaires développées à Tahiti et dans les atolls voisins de Moruroa et Fangataufa, bouleversent l’équilibre des populations locales en même temps qu’elles préparent le terrain pour les 193 explosions nucléaires qui ont lieu dans la région, entre 1966 et 1998. Malgré l’ampleur des moyens déployés par le gouvernement français pour légitimer ces tests, dont il assure qu’ils sont “propres”, ces archives éclairent l’absence de consensus autour de cette politique, et ce aussi bien du côté des puissances impériales ( qui venaient de négocier un arrêt des essais en atmosphère), que des mouvements contestataires anti-nucléaires. L'opposition au nucléaire militaire se cristallise durant les années 70, notamment autour de mouvements sociaux initiés par des groupes de Nouvelle Zélande Aotearoa. Cette vague protestataire se poursuit dans les années 1990, au cours desquelles ont lieu de nombreux actes de désobéissances civiles et de croisières anti-nucléaires comme celle du “Rainbow warrior”, l’emblématique navire de l’association écologiste Greenpeace. Majoritairement pacifiste, la contestation a a occasionnellement pris des formes plus violentes, ainsi que le souligne Charlie Ching dans l'entretien présenté dans ce programme. Il fonde en 1977, avec six autres jeunes tahitiens, le parti indépendantiste “Te Taata Tahiti Tiama” (“Le tahitien libre”) et mènent quelques actions violentes avant d’être arrêté et transféré dans une prison de région parisienne. Son procès sera très médiatisé, déclenchant une vague de solidarité en métropole. -- This program follows the stories of a select number of ecological and anti-nuclear movements, founded in response to the French government’s nuclear campaign in Polynesia between 1963 and 1998. In the political context of the nuclear arms race of the 1960’s, the French government decided in 1963 to install the “Centre d’Expérimentation Polynésien” (CEP) in the heart of Tahiti. The scale of the military occupation and infrastructure then developed in Tahiti and the neighboring Mururoa and Fangataufa upset the balance of the local populations, while at the same time paving the way for the 193 nuclear explosions that took place in the region between 1966 and 1998. Despite the means deployed by the French government to legitimize these tests, ensuring the “correct precautions” were in place, the films chosen, shine light on the lack of consensus surrounding the campaign, which included contesting viewpoints from other imperial powers (who had just negotiated a halt of atmospheric testing), as well as anti-nuclear protest movements. The following films demonstrate the crystallization of opposition to the nuclear actions of the military during the 1970’s, notably around the social initiatives of groups from New Zealand Aotearoa. This wave of protests continued until the 1990’s and included numerous acts of civil disobedience and anti-nuclear voyages of the “Rainbow Warrior”, the iconic ship associated with the Greenpeace ecological movement. Mostly pacifist, the opposition occasionally took a more violent form, as highlighted by Charlie Ching in the included interview. He founded, in 1977, with six other young Tahitians, the independent party, “Te Taata Tahiti Tiama” (“The Liberated Tahitian”) and led violent actions before being placed under arrest and transferred to a prison in greater Paris. His process would be highly publicized, triggering a new wave of solidarity in mainland France.
Films:
1960 (2 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1971 (20 min)
Mémoire filmique Pyréenées-Méditerranée
1973 (26 min)
Nga Taonga Sound & Vision
2008 (2 min)
Moruroa, mémorial des essais nucléaires français
Jeanne Mallard - Université Paris 8
En eaux troubles (62 min)
La mer a été un champ de bataille pendant de nombreux conflits armés. Les zones maritimes sont des lieux de commerce, d’échange, de voyage comme de conquête. Ce sont des territoires très prisés depuis les premières conquêtes territoriales par les pays européens. Elles mettent en lien les continents tout en les isolant. Pour subvenir à ses besoins, l’Homme a donc pris la mer et a chassé les êtres vivants de ses fonds. La pêche est une activité multiple, on l’associe aussi bien au domaine de la vie militaire avec la marine marchande qu’au domaine du loisir, au bord d’un lac, d’un océan, à pied ou en bord de mer. Devenue aujourd’hui commerciale et potentiellement dangereuse pour l’environnement et les écosystèmes, elle peut être artisanale ou bien intensive. On peut penser également à la pêche de subsistance qui se pratiquait davantage autrefois, lorsqu’elle n’était pas encore fortement règlementée et qu’elle répondait à des besoins d’autosuffisance alimentaire. La programmation qui va suivre s’est donc articulée non seulement autour de la pêche mais plus largement autour de la relation entre l’homme, animal terrestre, et la mer, les océans et ses habitants.
Films:
1925 (15 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1928 (14 min)
Cinémathèque Française
1957 (10 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Marion Brouant - Université Paris 8
La guerre des animaux (58 min)
Les animaux sont à la guerre humaine, un allié et un ennemi tangible, et à son Histoire et sa mémoire une allégorie idéale. Quelles sont les représentations des animaux dans les imaginaires des guerres du XXème siècles ? Avec la guerre de 1914-1918 arrivent la modernisation des combats et les nouvelles technologies d’armement. Pour autant, les animaux ne désertent pas les champs de bataille. Chiens, colombes et pigeons, ânes et chevaux : leur présence et leur représentation cinématographique questionnent le rapport à la technologie des guerres modernes. Elles concentrent à la fois la notion d’un pouvoir sur un être, et un enjeux moral, éthique, de remise en jeu de ce qui distingue l’homme de l’animal. Dans les diverses archives ici présentées, l’animal devient une métaphore humoristique, patriotique ou pathétique du rapport de l’homme à la guerre.
Films:
1913 (17 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1917 (19 min)
ECPAD
1917 (2 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1917 (3 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1940 (13 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1943 (2 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1950 (2 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
Juliette Kergadallan - Paris 8
Les gens de mer (67 min)
Ces archives très diverses, de par leurs dates et leurs origines, illustrent le sentiment universel de "l'appel de la mer". Cette programmation vise, d'une part, à offrir un tableau des différents métiers de la mer, particulièrement ceux des marin.e.s, des pêcheur.euse.s, des navigateur.rice.s que l'on appelle communément “les gens de mer”, c’est-à-dire tous ceux dont le métier est de naviguer et, par extension, tout Homme, à terre ou en mer, ayant un lien particulier avec la vie maritime. Elle présente d'autre part les “gens de la mer”, c'est-à-dire tous ceux qui, d'une manière ou d'une autre, ont un lien avec la mer (famille des "gens de mer", loisir...).
Films:
1953 (24 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1958 (2 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1962 (2 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1964 (1 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1983 (4 min)
BFI National archive
1925 (1 min)
Kvikmyndasafn Íslands
1967 (11 min)
ACMI
2021 (3 min)
Filmoteca Española
1984 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Lifei CHEN - Université Paris 8
Le monde invisible (66 min)
Cette visite de 66 minutes vous invite à explorer la diversité, les défis et la résilience des personnes aveugles grâce à des archives provenant de divers membres de la FIAF. À travers une sélection de quatre documentaires, dont ceux se penchant sur le processus de rééducation des militaires aveugles, des extraits montrant la vie des citoyens atteints de cécité, et la documentation des enfants ayant des déficiences visuelles alors qu'ils apprennent et grandissent dans des écoles spécialisées. Ces archives historiques vous permettront de découvrir comment ces individus perçoivent le monde, font face à la vie avec courage et résilience, et savourent les moments précieux de l'existence. Ce programme vous ouvrira une fenêtre sur la vie des personnes aveugles.
Films:
Première guerre mondiale (8 min)
ECPAD - Établissement de Communication et de Production Audiovisuelle de la Défense
1968 (25 min)
National Library of Scotland
1935 (2 min)
National Library of Scotland
1961 (31 min)
BFI National Archive
Antonin Baunez - Université de Paris 8
En souvenir des quatre saisons : l'Hiver (64 min)
La rareté croissante de la neige (en cause, le réchauffement climatique) m’a poussé à creuser la représentation de ce schéma au sein des collections de différents archives membres de la FIAF avec pour objectif de décrire l’intemporalité de la neige dans la vision européenne. C’est donc au travers d’une programmation de 9 films de formats, durées et époque variées que nous allons tenter de démontrer une certaine vision de cet état si particulier de l’eau.
Films:
1949 (1 min)
Danmark på Film
1905 (7 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1920 (9 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1947 (8 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1926 (5 min)
Archive nationale du film de Tchéquie
1960 (1 min)
National Library of Scotland
1960 (9 min)
Mémoire filmique Pyrénées Méditerranée
1968 (9 min)
Danmark på film
1930 (9 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Yi CHOU - Université Paris 8
Marché normale, marché spéciale (98 min)
Pour les hommes, marcher est une action naturelle que nous apprenons quand nous sommes petits. C'est également un moment charnière, notamment pour les enfants. « Les premiers pas d’un tout jeune enfant sont perçus comme une seconde venue au monde, qu’il va désormais pouvoir découvrir et arpenter. » dit Françoise Bonardel. Marcher avec de la vitesse, nous l'appelons « courir » ; marcher pourrait être une sorte de discipline militaire, ainsi qu'une progression. À travers ce programme d'archives audiovisuelles au sein des membres de la FIAF (Fédération Internationale des Archives du Film), nous vous présentons différentes formes de marche et les mouvements physiques de l'homme et de son corps.
Films:
1991 (6 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1931 (18 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1966 (68 min)
Cinémathèque Nationale du Chili
savion herscu - Tel-Aviv University
Childhood games in love (53 min)
One of the most significant ideas in the Freudian revolution is the existence of sexuality in children. Sigmund Freud and Lauretta Heiman have greatly discussed sexual development and phenomenology in childhood, and Freud expanded the conversation beyond the conventions existing at the time. In this program, I present three short films in which the topic of sexuality in children is expressed, in some cases as the sexuality we adults are familiar with, as well as in a more complex, childlike way through the experience of the young protagonists. The first film opening the program is an Israeli movie "Hole in the Pants" (1978) directed by Dalia Mevorach. It revolves around two neighboring children, a boy and girl, who are raised in completely different family environments and are drawn to each other's company and friendship. https://jfc.org.il/movie/65869-2/ The second film in the program is "Les Mistons" (1957), one of the first films by French director François Truffaut. It follows a group of children infatuated with a beautiful young woman, who they follow around as she develops a relationship with a lover. https://archive.org/details/les-mistons-1957 The last film in the program is "The Perfumed Memories of Marie-Rose" (1972) directed by Jacques Kébadian . In which Albertine, a rebellious teenage girl, demands her unlimited sexual freedom. https://www.cinematheque.fr/henri/film/124010-albertine-jacques-kebadian-1972/
Films:
1978 (14 min)
https://jfc.org.il/movie/65869-2/
1957 (18 min)
https://archive.org/details/les-mistons-1957
1972 (18 min)
https://www.cinematheque.fr/henri/film/124010-albertine-jacques-kebadian-1972/
Naama Rotem - Tel Aviv University
Stories of Cities (58 min)
Welcome to the captivating world of the 60-minute short film curation program, a cinematic journey that transports viewers through time and space, exploring the essence of cities from around the globe. This unique program showcases a carefully curated selection of old movies, each painting a vivid portrait of a city and its unique cultural tapestry. These films offer a glimpse into the soul of each city. With each passing minute, audiences are immersed in the sights, sounds, and stories that have shaped these urban landscapes, forging a deeper connection to the diverse and interconnected world we inhabit. So, sit back, and let these time-honored cinematic gems be your window to the world.
Films:
1960 (17 min)
Danmark på film
1933 (11 min)
Harvard Film Archive
Unknown (3 min)
Jerusalem Cinematheque - Israel Film Archive
1954 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1952 (17 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Shaked Almoznino - Tel Aviv University
representation of women (during time) (90 min)
I chose films that deal with the representation of women, mostly as a secondary theme, they are manly focusing about the looks and the show of a woman, but also about the transition from passive to active, that doesn't necessarily works as planed. It is recommended to watch the movies in the order listed, which is according to the production year, and I believe shows the development of the women during those times. Now We Are in the Air (1927) – 23 min San Francisco Silent Film Festival I Saw Their Angry Faces (1977) – 10 min Harvard Film Archive Fitting Image. Women 88 (1988) – 5 min NFSA - National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (Film Australia Collection) Savannah (1989) – 30 min UCLA Film & Television Archive (Student Films) A Short Film (1993) – 22 min JFC - Jerusalem Cinematheque (Israel Film Archive) Hope you enjoy it and understand my intentions with this list of movies. Thank you.
Films:
1927 (23 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1977 (10 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1988 (5 min)
NFSA - National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (Film Australia Collection)
1989 (30 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive (Student Films)
1993 (22 min)
JFC - Jerusalem Cinematheque (Israel Film Archive)
Idan dimant - Tel Aviv university
misguided representation of women and health issues (89 min)
In my plan I will be asking to talk about the representation of women and the misdirected common knowledge about health care, intertwining the idea of controlling women by driving the, mad in a patriarchal society. The first film I would like to present is from the L.A REBBELION collection by UCLA university. “The kitchen” a short movie made in 1975 by student named Alile Sharon Larkin. She visualizes a mental ward as a possible equivalent to prison incarceration for women of color. The cause of a woman’s nervous breakdown here is personal and political, namely hair, a trauma for many Black women . https://www.cinema.ucla.edu/la-rebellion/films/kitchen The next movie I would like to present is an Israeli one, named “Late Marriage”, by Dover kosashvilli. The movie presents the process of a man trying to disconnect his family unforgiving ties, while trying not to lose the love of his life. At the end of the movie, race beats love and the woman gets blamed of “craziness” for speaking her truth and her refusal to lose him, but mostly herself. https://jfc.org.il/en/movie/25098-2/
Films:
1975 (6 min)
UCLA
2004 (83 min)
Tel Aviv university
yara qubti - tel aviv university
Post-War films: Refuge, Shadows, and Rehabilitation (79 min)
Post-War films: Refuge, Shadows, and Rehabilitation, is an immersive cinematic experience that invites viewers to explore the intricate tapestry of post-war existence. Through this curated selection of films, the program delves deep into the emotional, social, and psychological aftermath of war. Each film offers a distinct lens through which to understand the challenges faced by individuals and communities as they navigate the complexities of rebuilding, finding solace, and seeking redemption. By presenting a diverse range of narratives and perspectives, this program aims to foster understanding, empathy, and reflection on the profound impact of war on human lives.
Films:
1975 (53 min)
Eye Film
1959 (25 min)
BFI
1947 (1 min)
Imperial war museum
Yilin La - Indiana University Bloomington
Who knows a woodchuck (12 min)
Before moving to the Midwest a few years ago, I first came across a woodchuck in Henry David Thoreau – “As I came home through the woods with my string of fish, trailing my pole, it being now quite dark, I caught a glimpse of a woodchuck stealing across my path, and felt a strange thrill of savage delight, and was strongly tempted to seize and devour him raw; not that I was hungry then, except for that wildness which he represented. Once or twice, however, while I lived at the pond, I found myself ranging the woods, like a half–starved hound, with a strange abandonment, seeking some kind of venison which I might devour, and no morsel could have been too savage for me. The wildest scenes had become unaccountably familiar. I found in myself, and still find, an instinct toward a higher, or, as it is named, spiritual life, as do most men, and another toward a primitive rank and savage one, and I reverence them both” (“Higher Laws”). This short program draws attention to other human reactions to a woodchuck, respectively archived in documentary and staged mischief. The blasting of groundhog holes in William Gillis Ross home movies (Trip of the Nahma) begins at 12:36.
Films:
1948 (11 min)
IU Libraries Moving Image Archive
1927 (1 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
Marly Gamil - Indiana University Bloomington
Pirates! An Exploration in Film (115 min)
Pirates have captured our imagination for a long time — three centuries, in fact, ever since the publication of the (in)famous “General History of the Pyrates” by the mysterious Captain Charles Johnson in 1724. This set of biographies was a hit with the reading public of the time and the cast of characters it introduced, from Blackbeard to Captain Kidd to Anne Bonny and Mary Read, have remained in the popular consciousness. Though the historical facts presented in “General History of the Pyrates” have been debated, the truth remains that it transformed the men and women who forefronted the so-called Golden Age of Piracy into notorious legends that we are still fascinated with to this day, making them and their history feel almost as fictional as Treasure Island’s Long John Silver and Peter Pan’s Captain Hook. It is no surprise, then, that these fantastical pirates quickly began appearing in our films as well. Two early depictions are the silent films, Betty and the Buccaneers (1917), a lighthearted American adventure film in which the pirates play the villains, and Il corsaro (1924), a grittier Italian romantic drama in which the titular pirate is the protagonist’s love interest. In both Cinesound Varieties (1934), an Australian variety film, and in Sunil Merirosvot (1958), a Finnish commercial for laundry detergent, pirates are used for their novelty factor to draw the audience’s attention. Finally, in Pirates Off Our Coast (1958), we see pirates appear in children’s educational media. If nothing else, the wide variety of genres and locations that pirates appear in is worth the exploration!
Films:
1917 (63 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1924 (33 min)
Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1934 (3 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1958 (1 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti
1958 (15 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Rachel Knight - Indiana University Bloomington
Dragons Around The World (60 min)
According to the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, a dragon is "a large lizard- or serpent-like creature, conceived in some traditions as evil and in others as beneficent." These creatures appear throughout folklore and fantasy, from Chinese mythology to contemporary American television shows like House of the Dragon. In recent years, dragons have been prevalent in animated media, such as the Dragon Tales TV series and the How To Train Your Dragon films, though this development did not come out of nowhere. These five films provide examples of historical media about or containing dragons of all sorts from across the world, and are far from the only examples of draconic creatures in collections across the FIAF community. Whether you grew up with tales of dragons stealing princesses, you wished to have a friend like Elliot, or you attend Lunar New Year parades every year to watch the dragon dances, there's a dragon story for everyone if you look closely enough. Every culture has their own lens through which they see the world, and their methods of depicting dragons are one point of comparison between those lenses.
Films:
1926 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1980 (10 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1982 (33 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1997 (1 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
2007 (2 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
Ean Teague - Indiana University Bloomington
Olympics Around the World (57 min)
Since their revival in 1896, the Olympic Games have truly become a global phenomenon. The Games have been celebrated all over the world, in Summer and Winter, featuring a wide variety of languages and cultures as a backdrop. Now, for many people worldwide every four years (myself included), the big three of Gymnastics, Athletics, and Swimming, as well as the Opening Ceremony, are appointment television, no matter the time difference. Unfortunately, the further we go back in time, the less visual evidence and memory we have for those initial games. In this programme, we take a look back as far as the now-unofficial 1906 Intercalated Games in Athens (per the production date on the Armat Collection), into London 1908, and up through Munich 1972 and Los Angeles 1984, examining short or compiled highlights of the Games in its different eras. In some cases, we see preparations for the Games, even years in advance of the start of the event. The programme is ordered chronologically with most of the films serving as a reflection of the Olympic Spirit as it was at a time before the introduction of commercialization and the professionalization of sport. In some cases, human creativity helps to fill the gaps, as seen in the Japanese Animated Film Classics film, which offers an interpretation of Amsterdam 1928. Please enjoy the selection, which presents humankind attempting to achieve the motto of the Games, Citius, Altius, Fortius – Communiter.
Films:
1906 (6 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1908 (5 min)
British Film Institute
1928 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1948 (9 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1956 (8 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1972 (9 min)
Bundesarchiv
1980 (6 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
Marloes (Loesje) Krabbe - Indiana University-Bloomington
Puppets as Access Points for Information (78 min)
Puppetry dates back to as early as the 5th century in written records from Europe (i.e. the Symposium of the Greek historian Xenophon). Despite the lack of ancient written records in Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas, there are still rich traditions of puppetry for the likes of ritual, magic, and entertainment. Some scholars even argue that puppets pre-date the use of actors to depict stories, thus making it one of the earliest, if not the earliest form of theatre. Puppetry takes many forms, from marionettes, to finger puppets, to hand and glove puppets, to rod puppets with each form having unique characteristics for use. Regardless of these many forms, puppets all require one thing in order to work: a human. With their lengthy history and the need for human participation, puppetry stands as an ancient form of art to tell stories, impart moral messages, and entertain. So why then, in a time where actors and actresses are plentiful, do we continue to use puppets to communicate information? Why do we use puppets--silly little imaginings of people, animals, or abstract figures--to talk about difficult subject matter, such as the experiences of refugees or the need to reuse materials during the war? Perhaps puppets provide us with the necessary distance from these difficult topics while still remaining innately human. This programme seeks to answer 'why the puppet?' through its exploration of puppets through the 20th century and early 21st century. Specifically excluding longer format content of puppets for kids, this programme focuses on public service announcements, educational films, and propaganda pieces utilizing puppets for the imparting of information. To set the scene for understanding the use of puppets for communication, the program begins with "Blue like an orange," a documentary film by UNESCO that showcases puppet plays in India, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Laos, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the United States today as a way of understanding different cultures. Taking viewers from the Netherlands during World War I (1914-1918) to Australia and the captivity of child refugees during 2003, "Puppets as Access Points for Information" illustrates the enduring quality of puppetry in the face of humankind's continued struggled to make sense of the world.
Films:
n.d. (26 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1914-1918 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1942 (2 min)
Imperial War Museums
1949 (19 min)
Library of Congress
1953 (12 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1960 (5 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1986 (2 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
2003 (8 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Holly Lemna - Indiana University- Bloomington
Coffee: Production and Consumption (86 min)
Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world. It is drunk warm or cold, sweetened or unsweetened, often with milk or cream or diluted with water. It is made by being dripped or boiled through filters. Espresso, a form of coffee that forms the basis of most drinks that are ordered at cafés around the world, is made by forcing boiling water under great pressure through ground coffee beans in a filter. Most modern coffee chains, like Starbucks, base their drinks on ones from Italian coffee culture, such as lattes and cappuccinos. In fact, Italian and French coffee cultures are probably the most popular influences in the coffee industry. That said, however, coffee has a far longer history and a far broader adoption by a variety of cultures- from the Kaffa region in Ethiopia, where it originated, to as far as the Arctic Circle. The films selected for this programme are meant to illustrate two sides of coffee: production and consumption. For every commercial depicting the ease and comfort in making a cup of coffee (particularly instant coffee, such as the Gregg's commercial), there is another film that illustrates the processes by which coffee plants are cultivated and harvested, their beans roasted to varying degrees and shipped, and their plantation's workers treated. Special attention should be given to the plantations featured in Plantation de Thé, Café, et Abrasin (1952-1953), which features child workers and the small meals of rice and fish given to workers at a colonial plantation in French Indochina near the end of France's colonization of the areas in Southeast Asia. Another area of interest, on the consumption side, is the Gregg's Coffee commercial (1970), which is believed to be the first multicultural television advertisement to be broadcast in New Zealand, and the first to feature Maori individuals.
Films:
1959 (6 min)
National Library of Scotland
1966 (14 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa- Museu do Cinema
1953-1955 (12 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1959 (13 min)
Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1970 (1 min)
Nga Taonga Sound & Vision
1925 (28 min)
University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections
1960s (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1952 (11 min)
Indiana University Moving Image Archive
Julie Wasserman - Indiana University
Watching Others Cook (84 min)
Long before the time of The Food Network, celebrity chefs, and hyped-up cooking battles, cooking shows were a novelty. Yes, there is something innate about watching others cook, particularly our parents or grandparents, and humans have been taking part for millennia. But with the invention of film, we were suddenly able to capture an array of food and cooking practices from around the world, and, perhaps for the first time ever, opened our collective eyes to food outside of our own cultural spheres. The films below are a compilation of cooking demos, shows, and documentary shorts from Brazil, Spain, Australia, France, Switzerland, and the US from as early as 1919. Watching this archival footage reminds us how beautiful and varied our international food heritage is and offers us the promise that it will not be forgotten.
Films:
ca. 1919 (13 min)
CNC French Film Archive
1955 (11 min)
Banco de Conteudos Culturais
1963 (13 min)
Brittany Film Archive
1952 (11 min)
ACMI Collection
1972 (16 min)
Cinematheque Des Pays De Savoie Et De L'Ain
1972 (5 min)
Lichtspiel-Archiv online
1970 (15 min)
Indiana University Media Collections Online
Jo Otremba - Indiana University
A Celebration of Stop Motion Animation (78 min)
Since I was very young, major holidays for my family meant we watched the stop motion animated specials made for television such as "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer" and "Here Comes Peter Cottontail." When watching stop motion animation, its quickly apparent to the viewer just how much time, meticulous effort, and precision it takes to construct a film frame by frame. This selection of films showcase a wide range of countries, years of production, purposes for the film, and methods of utilizing stop motion animation to create a unique viewing experience. Some of these films were created for advertising or commercial use to create a backstory for a brand or the product. Additionally, a section of these films are used in educational spaces and were designed to teach kids about safety. Another special aspect of these films is the choices of music, dialogue, or to keep the film silent. As stop motion can create worlds and experiences for their characters that exist outside of reality, the artistic range for these films are endless and something to be celebrated. These films come from 10 different countries: Chile, United States, Sweden, Ukraine, Australia, Norway, Netherlands, Poland, and Russia. Viewers are asked to compare and contrast the styles of storytelling and imagery used in the stop motion animation style for each country.
Films:
2010 (4 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1954 (15 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1953 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1950 (2 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1967 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1960 (5 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1977 (4 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1974 (18 min)
Gosfilmofond of Russia
1996 (10 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
2006 (15 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
Wayne Hastings - Indiana University
The Folk Tourism Destination (72 min)
Within the last century, the tourism industry has exploded with appropriations of folk traditions and culture. The commercialization of cultural traditions, most notably the selling of weaved baskets and quilted blankets from the American southwest, has decontextualized these items’ original practical nature - the reason why these items were significant. However, it is intriguing to investigate the consequences behind labeling a geographic area as a folk tourist destination. By curating a list of tourist films, this exhibition hopes to explore whether tourism is embraced as a potential avenue for preserving the traditional arts, why countries label neighboring countries as bucolic getaways, and what is the cultural significance of labeling one’s own city as a folk destination. The films included are largely from the mid 20th century and feature cities stretching across Europe and North America. Brown County, Indiana is featured in an excerpt from “Indiana’s Scenic State Parks” (1957) and is representative of how Nashville, the county seat, used its state park to further promote itself as a bucolic getaway. Rustic cabins are available for visitors near the Abe Martin Lodge, a cartoon hillbilly who is a caricature of the residents. In many ways this can be seen as a mockery of Brown County, but the tourism industry has also revitalized the county’s economy. “Mevagassey from Fishing to Tourism” (1962) highlights how tourism also helped revitalize an economy when the traditional industries were failing. A local family noted that the small English village is still known for fishing, and people continue to come to visit the rustic coast, but families cannot solely rely on fishing. The same can be said for the Scottish coastal town of Lochearnhead, where waterskiing has supported the rural economy in “NEXT STOP - SCOTLAND” (1968). “Gippsland Honeymoon” (1962), “Sommerparadiset i Oslofjorden” (1953), and “Seeing Canada” (1929) each follow cosmopolitan travelers exploring the country-sides of Australia, Norway, and Canada. Tourists have always been interested in “escaping” and in each of these films there is a fascination with the “common” man and women. In many cases, the rural farmers and folk artists are closely associated with the national identity of these countries. This is the case with "Ireland in a Horse Drawn Carriage" (1974), where the traditions and folklore of common peoples is linked to national pride. Mid 20th century tourist films supply endless potential for interpretation of a town’s identity, economy, and historic sense of place.
Films:
1957 (2 min)
Indiana University
1962 (5 min)
National Library of Wales Screen & Sound Archive
1968 (29 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1962 (14 min)
ACMI Collection
1953 (3 min)
National Library of Norway
1929 (13 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1974 (6 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Myren Mitchell - Indiana University
Animals as Main Characters in Animation (61 min)
A majority of films feature humans at the forefront of a story. The world of animation allows filmmakers to go beyond what we are able to accomplish in real life and explore more imaginative concepts. This collection of short films focuses on non-human characters and their unique experiences within the world through the medium of animation. The films utilize a variety of animation techniques including traditional hand-drawn animation, puppetry, and stop motion animation. Examples of films in this collection include a movie theater advertisement for Coca-Cola from 1953 retelling the timeless tale of the tortoise and the hare and a Ukrainian animation of a young wolf having a chance meeting with a rain creature that changes his life. Finally, “The Last Elk” is a tale of the last wild elk that utilizes different musical instruments to represent different animals in the forest with the Elk. These seven films were created between 1953 and 1998. They are listed in chronological order in order to view how animation styles have evolved over time. Take in the unique animation styles, musical accompaniments, and emotional tones present in the different films.
Films:
1953 (3 min)
Academy Film Archive
1956 (14 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1980 (9 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Centre
1988 (14 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1988 (10 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Centre
1996 (4 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1998 (7 min)
Irish Film Archive
Kate Galbreath - Indiana University
Down By the Sea (60 min)
71% of the earth is made of water but only 10% of it has been explored. Despite not knowing everything that lies beneath, us humans still explore the oceans in many different ways. Whether it be observing beautiful waves or exploring the depths of the sea, the ocean is fascinating and can be observed from many different angles. The four films selected show the different ways humans view the ocean. The first film "The Sea" (1962) made by the Encyclopaedia Britannica Education Corporation explores sea life from the open ocean to the deep dark depths of the ocean floor. The second film is a peaceful film named "Waves"(1973). The film shows how the ocean is observed from land. It is sometimes hard to imagine all that was shown in the first film could be lurking beneath the calm waves. While the ocean can be peaceful, it can also be terrifying and uncontrollable as shown in the third film "S.S. "Coptic" running against the storm"(1898). Seeing a ship weather a storm leads to the final film, "Grave of the President" (1984) which shows the aftermath of a storm and a ship sinking to the bottom of the ocean. The film follows scuba divers exploring a shipwreck. Going from peaceful fishes and waves to storms and shipwrecks which shows the wide range of what happens in the ocean, especially since these films are pulled from all over the globe. Who knows what else lurks out there and what the ocean has in store?
Films:
1962 (28 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1973 (26 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1898 (2 min)
Library of Congress
1984 (4 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
John Knight - Indiana University Bloomington
Enriching Animation: The use of Animation in Educational and Historical Films (89 min)
While animation as a medium was always intended with older audiences in mind, it has often been associated with and used to help attract young viewers. Due to this, animation is sometimes used in classroom and other educational materials. Because animation is not limited to the constraints of real film, it can help with creating diagrams, showing concepts hard to express in person, and be used as transitions between acting. This collection looks at various educational and historical animations (or films that include animated segments) from around the world. Some of the material is intended for young audiences while others are intended for older ages. It features animations from France (Mickey Mouse au Vietnam 1969), Mexico (Juárez 1972), Thailand (แสงช่วยเราอย่างไร ‘How does light help us’ 1955), Scotland (So You Think You Know About the Cuts 1976), the United States (Flow of electricity 1961; Your friend the soil 1954; The adventures of Junior Raindrop 1948), Japan (A Story of Tobacco 1926; The Development of the Train 1932), and Ukraine (Обережно — нерви! ‘Beware — the Nerves!’ 1975).
Films:
1969 (1 min)
Cinémathèque française
1972 (14 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1955 (10 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1976 (13 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1961 (12 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1954 (7 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1948 (8 min)
Library of Congress
1926 (3 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1932 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1975 (7 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
Erika Giddens - Indiana University
Rain (83 min)
“Look at the rain long enough, with no thoughts in your head, and you gradually feel your body falling loose, shaking free of the world of reality. Rain has the power to hypnotize.” ― Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun. Rain is an instrument, a device, a setting, a mood, an obstacle, a celebration. It is science, it is story, it’s just weather. Rain is something to plan for or to carry on in spite of. Whether it’s captured accidentally, deliberately, or even painstakingly animated, rain appears on film for each of these purposes. To include rain in film is to capture an integral piece of humanity’s relationship with the natural world. Furthermore, we allow rain to stand in as a mirror for our own emotional condition – a storm can be a sigh of relief after a drought or, more frequently, a representation of inner turmoil. Its malleability makes it one of our most powerful storytelling tools. This small collection attempts to show the diversity of the documentation of rain, including educational materials and artistic films, spanning almost one hundred years. In the student film L.A. Rebellion (1978), the protagonist cycles through song after song about rain, finally settling on “Rainy Days and Mondays” by Johnny Hartman before looking out the window and sighing, “Oh, it’s raining,” and slowly moving through her morning routine. She notes, “Rain…it makes everything seem slower.” The music and the weather communicate a familiar dreariness, and the protagonist reflects on her evolving relationship with rain throughout the short film. The short film RAINDROP (1975) is a beautiful collection of nature footage that shows the journey of a raindrop as it moves through the world. Dun Laoghaire Storm (1960s) is a silent amateur film that shows a stormy evening in Ireland. The Kill It and Leave This Town trailer (2020) opens with a dramatic storm in sketchbook style animation, with the rain complementing the horror elements of the film. In De Dood van Rudolph Valentino (1926), crowds line up in the rain for three days to mourn actor Rudolph Valentino; this film contains some parallels to the military parade marching through the rain in Le défilé militaire du 14 juillet 2001. Mexico City experiences unusual weather—outtakes (1929) documents rain and hail flooding Mexico City, and What Makes Rain (1946) is an educational Young America Films. Finally, The Rainshower / Dimension Films (1965) is another informational film that explains how rain affects people and animals. Whether fiction or nonfiction, live or animated, the ubiquitous presence of rain is all around us and documented on film.
Films:
1978 (16 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1975 (11 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1960s (2 min)
Irish Film Institute
1926 (5 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
2001 (17 min)
ECPAD - Établissement de Communication et de Production Audiovisuelle de la Défense
1946 (11 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1965 (16 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1929 (3 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
Caleb Schuster - Indiana University
Tea by the Reel (41 min)
Tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world alongside coffee and soda. From its early origins in China and India, tea has spread to all corners of the world. Tea has taken root and developed cultures and ceremonies centering around it in countries as far from each other as Japan and the UK. The emphasis of these six films is tea in the anglophone world with the exception of Brooke Bond te-reklame, a short commercial from the National Library in Norway. Of these six films four are commercials, one is an amateur documentary, and one (New Zealand Industries) is a hybrid between a commercial and a documentary. Tea Time, the longest of these films was filmed by Nat & Nettie McGavin on 16mm film stock. The documentary was entered in the Scottish Amateur Film Festival of 1962. PG Tips presents a funny take on one Irish woman’s need for tea while the Army TV Commercial speaks to the pervasiveness of tea in British culture. Tea Making Tips was produced in the UK during WWII and presents some bizarre tips on how to make tea during wartime shortages. New Zealand Industries. Tea Packing and Blending encourages New Zealanders to buy locally, and shows the processes of tea packing and tea blending in New Zealand by Bell Tea Co. So, from nostalgic feels to quirky tips on how to make a better cuppa tea; be entertained and become informed as you watch this selection of commercials and documentaries all about tea.
Films:
1932 (7 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1960s (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1972 (1 min)
Imperial War Museums
1962 (21 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1960 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket
1941 (10 min)
British Film Institute
Oscar Becher - Vinegar Syndrome, New York University
Sex at First Sight: A Showcase of Seduction in Motion (88 min)
Every genre of cinema intersects with sex. It sells, shocks, titillates and fascinates. From the dawn of using photographic emulsion to document movement - motion picture film has been utilized to exploit the human desire for sex. Sexually-explicit material has always been an issue for archives that seek to collect materials that hold an inherent value and relate to the larger context of the surrounding history in which they were created. This program approaches intimacy throughout the decades by exhibiting the artistic use of seduction as a cover for sexuality. Without visionary approaches to subversively broaching this topic by filmmakers in addition to the often unspoken work of archivists preserving work that contains difficult subject matter, the history of cinema might possibly have been devoid of this terribly tantalizing topic. So, forget Netflix and chill - watch these and Archive and chill instead!
Films:
1896 (2 min)
La Cinémathèque française
1910 (18 min)
The Library of Congress
1940 (25 min)
Yale Film Archive
1966 (5 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1970 (27 min)
The Israeli Film Archive
1977 (11 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
Liza Kastrilevich - New York University
Fairy Tales in Animation (73 min)
Ah, fairy tales. We all grow up with them one way or another. At bedtime or in school, they were read to us when we were kids. Told to us by our parents or grandparents, adding their own perspective and flair to it. These stories were passed down to us, retold from books that were later transformed into recollections from the person who is telling the particular fairy tale from memory. But what makes us enjoy these stories so much? Especially when we watch them as animations? It’s a feeling of nostalgia that hits us. It takes us back to when we were children, feeling cozy with our loved ones, listening to them tell us these tales while we imagine them in our head. In this program, dive into the retelling of some of our favorite fairy tales that we all know. Feel comfort and joy. Remember what it was like when this story was first told to you. Sink into this feeling as you watch. Now…it is time… to go back in time.
Films:
1996 (9 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1932 (15 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1953 (3 min)
Academy Film Archive
1977 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1980 (12 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1960 (5 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
2008 (6 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1971 (13 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Vitor Graize - Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Cine Metrópolis
The smell of us (89 min)
Public festivals, rituals, private celebrations. The complex indigenous cosmologies, mixed cultures, sacred religious dates and events of capitalism. Fire, burning herbs, flowers and fruits. The colors, sounds, bodies, and smells of us are represented in many films, from home movies to commissioned documentaries. Here is a short path to follow the tracks of how this dimension of the our lives in many cultures was represented in movies since the beginning of the film history. The program is also a trigger to think about when and how indigenous peoples, cultures freed from colonialism and traditional communities took control of their own representations in cinema.
Films:
early 1950s (3 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1981 (26 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1962 (19 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1932 (10 min)
The British Film Institut (BFI)
1909 (5 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1968 (11 min)
Cineteca Nacional
1960 (14 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
Sébastien Roussel - La Cinémathèque Française
Inspire/Expire (81 min)
L’odeur est un rapport au monde. Une connexion intuitive qui nous relie à l’animal. Elle façonne notre appréhension à la nature, à notre environnement, à la nourriture. Elle convoque notre mémoire et nous renvoie à des lieux, des gestes, des instants et affects emprunts de nostalgie. Manufacturée, elle annihile, camoufle son état originel pour devenir un marqueur social qui véhicule des informations. Volatile, insaisissable, elle peut annoncer des menaces, un nuage noir qui renvoie la matière à l’état de fumée.
Films:
1939 (01 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1905 (1 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1966 (45 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1950 (23 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1964 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1926 (3 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1914 (7 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
Juana Suárez - NYU
Toxic worlds (36 min)
Depictions of waste, toxicity, environmental destruction, fumes, excess, and pollution have been ever-present in cinema. At times playful, contestatory in some cases, commercial or just as records of public works or government negligence, these moving images shed light (literally) on contemporary discussions about the environment and enter into conversation with a massive production that anticipates apocalyptic and dystopian worlds.
Films:
1970 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1968 (3 min)
Yale Film Archive
1946 (1 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1929 (4 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1985 (3 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1957 (12 min)
Cineteca Nazionale
1948 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional
1909 (7 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
1905 (4 min)
The Museum of Modern Art
Carolina Monge - Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
Le trait (49 min)
Le trait est une idée traduite en une marque créée par un mouvement du corps à travers d’un instrument. C'est aussi une forme de connexion entre l'idée et le spectateur sur un support. Dans cette sélection de matériel audiovisuel, le trait transgresse les limites de la toile pour rendre le film son nouveau support d’expression et propose différentes formes d’intervention avec des lignes.
Films:
1945 (11 min)
Media Collection Online Indiana University
1994 (11 min)
Elävä muisti
1917 (9 min)
European Film Gateway
1900 (2 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
première décennie du XX siècle (7 min)
Institut Valencià de Cultura
1935 (4 min)
Japanese Animated Film
1921 (3 min)
BFI
Déposé en 2017 (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Déposé en 2017 (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Ryan Finnigan - Showroom Cinema
Smells Like Going Home (50 min)
Moving image archives capture moments in space and time. These pictures trigger our memories, keep record of our cultural heritage and provoke nostalgic responses. However, the inherent absence of smell from the moving image removes the olfactory response and the exceptional ability of ‘the Proust effect’ to instantaneously trigger vivid autobiographical memories. The smell of the familiar and the comforting feeling that it brings often leads us to describe something that “smells like home”, but can the reverse be true? Do images that show familiar scenes of our home lives provoke memories of their scent? If they do indeed remind us of a smell, do we all smell the same home? This short programme presents a variety of scenarios selected to show both universal and specific home comforts from a cup of tea and the spray of the sea to freshly cooked meats and newly clean sheets - with the addition of some pungent stenches for contrast.
Films:
1980s (1 min)
IFI
unknown (2 min)
Academy Film Archive
1947 (23 min)
La Cinematheque Francaise
1970 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1914 (2 min)
George Eastman Museum
1930 (18 min)
BFI
Catherine Anne Pace - Baker Electric Filmhaus
Limonaia (90 min)
Candlelight. Flame. Flickers… fumare. “Wherever citrus trees are gathered together, they cross-pollinate, and over time varieties develop that are peculiar to their setting… Spremuta d’arancia: a good omen. [Citrus bergamia] is like an animal in its chosen territory…Take it away from its home ground and you will make it a perpetual invalid, incapable of tolerating the cold weathering strong winds…carefree, liberated, untidy and entirely organic…the addition of bergamot oil makes a perfume last longer and brings all its other elements into harmony, rather like the conductor of an orchestra.” (Attlee, 2014). Amber light, where red meets yellow, emotes warmth and resilience. Fire. Fight. Willpower. Veins: when blue blood turns to gold. This program of films exhibits characteristics of both the warmth and fury of flame, as well as the deliberate strength of the bergamot plant. The personalities of the people, times, and the film material itself allude to the vigor and sensitivity of our planet’s atmosphere and the people within it. Beauty is also a theme within the frames of these old and new “flickers”, in the sense of individuality through creativity and willpower. When kept in amicable conditions, a film can last hundreds of years; celluloid material is sturdy yet picky, just as living beings are. What is defined as a “harsh” condition to one may be an environment where another thrives; not many other fruits will blossom in the rocky terrain where bergamot thrives. We have beauty that may be seen by others when we plant ourselves in strange climates, however if the nourishment we require is not there we are hanging on the thread of our own tenacity. We may plant ourselves in foreign places to fulfil our destiny and, although the environment around us may not be directly encouraging, we thrive if our mission is being fulfilled. Humans find “home” within or deepest dreams and desires. We become truly alive when we are honest with ourselves and offer our souls the possibility of living authentically to our unique nature. Citation: Attlee, H. (2014, April 3). The Land Where Lemons Grow: The Story of Italy and Its Citrus Fruit.
Films:
2022 (11 min)
La Cinémathèque française / Henri
1919 (4 min)
George Eastman Museum
1911 (53 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale / Cincopa
1961 (1 min)
National Aeronautics Space Administration
1968 (19 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
1900 (2 min)
The Library of Congress
Aisha Rahim - Festival des 3 Continents, Nantes
A turn around the sun (56 min)
In the beginning was the colour orange. A friction, an expansion, a fecundation. In the beginning was the orange. An explosion, a birth, a potency. In the beginning was the orange. A turn around oneself to return to the starting point. In the beginning was the orange. An existence, a movement, a permanent revolution.
Films:
1978 (10 min)
Yale Film Archive
1956 (6 min)
BFI National Archive
1973 (7 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1968 (33 min)
Cinémathèque française
Elodie Imbeau - La Cinémathèque française
Lignes de production/ Production de lignes (56 min)
A partir de la fascination pour les chaînes de fabrication des usines, en pensant au film d'Alain Resnais, le Chant du Styrène (1985) ou à l'usine Plastac dans mon Oncle (1958)de Jacques Tati, cette programmation montre comment le cinéma rend compte de la transformation de la matière, grâce à la prise de vue, au montage ou même en dessinant directement sur la pellicule. Les gestes des hommes et la ligne de fabrication des objets industriels (du peigne au formica en passant par le travail du fer) témoignent d'un regard attentif porté sur cette période de la fin des années 1960, période de bascule dans un monde moderne où le plastic est la matière de l'avenir. Les films abstraits viennent en contrepoint à cet enregistrement documentaire et montre la saccade ou au contraire la recherche d'une harmonie dans le mouvement des formes.
Films:
? (6 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée
1958 (2 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1960 (10 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
? (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Fin années 1950 (25 min)
Institut Jean Vigo
1957 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1924 (7 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
Aleksandra Pyziak-Sadulska - National Film Archive-Audiovisual Institute, FINA
Soak up the sun (55 min)
Is biting into oranges like biting into a burning sun? What feelings does biting into a juicy fruit bring? Is it as if we are dipping into the orange sun in the light of the golden hour? 'Orange' is a homonym. The word itself is based on ambiguity. It defines both the object and the colour it acquires thanks to the hot rays of the sun, which make it what it is - a juicy fruit that has swallowed the sun, basking in its light. The orange hides the sun that illuminates it from within, giving it shape and life. Oranges, due to their beautiful colour and spherical shape, have for centuries been associated with the sun, which, as essential to life, symbolises fertility, reproduction and vital energy. In many mythologies, the orange as the 'Golden Apple' has been linked to the story of the creation of the world. Oranges are thus like little suns. Everything within the range of the sun's rays is drowned in orange light. The golden hour is reflected with the orange colour on buildings, on trees, on faces, on skin, on the sea. When we greedily gaze up at the sky thirsting for light, for warmth, for sunshine, what afterimage does this leave in us? What film weaves under our eyelids? The programme uses as its starting point the homonymous sound of the word 'orange', the colour and shape of the fruit and the conditions for growing oranges, which bring to mind the sunny south. It loosely follows the rather poetic associations with what being under the golden sun brings, capturing glimpses of experience of biting into the juicy fruit: sea breezes, dazzling views, joy, but also the melancholy associated with sunset, sensual pleasure and, finally, abstract afterimages under the eyelids. In parallel, it explores the motif of sun-orange sphericity and the cyclical rhythm of the world and its constant astronomical dynamics, based on coexistence and interdependence.
Films:
early 1900s (4 min)
Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1938 (1 min)
Hungarian National Film Archive
1966 (5 min)
National Library of Scotland, Moving Image Archive
1947 (9 min)
Indiana University, Moving Image Archive
1931 (3 min)
National Film Archive of Japan, Japanese Animated Film Classics
1902 (3 min)
Cineteca Italiana
1973 (3 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1966 (6 min)
ACMI Collections
1928 (1 min)
Cinémathèque française
1946 (3 min)
Danish Film Institute
1965 (2 min)
The Israeli Film Archive - Jerusalem Cinematheque
1980 (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1926 (6 min)
The Museum of Modern Art
1945 (2 min)
The New Zealand Archive of Film, Television and Sound Ngā Taonga
1958 (3 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile - Centro Cultural La Moneda
Ambroos Laermans - Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
Exploring orange as a colour. (47 min)
To say orange is to speak of a fruit, a colour and sometimes of a football team. Leaving the fruit and the football behind, what can we say about orange as a colour? What do we see in orange, that we don’t see in other colours? What specific meanings can it carry? Those questions are the guiding principles to explore orange as a colour. Looking at the use of orange’s orangeness, one can move through a range of uses of the specificity of orange. Orange can be used as a colour that’s just as good as any other colour. It is used because colour is wanted, with little regard as to what colour that is. Orange can also take a formal meaning. Its difference from other colours can be used to differentiate and to identify. Nevertheless this use does not exploit the specific meanings that orange can carry. Orange can carry specific meanings and it’s through these meanings that the specificity of orange as opposed to other colours transpires. Finally, these meanings can be instrumentalised for the creation of a narrative or a metaphor, taking up a broader symbolic meaning. By exploring orange as a colour, we move through this range trying to track down some of the specificities of orange and how these are used to create meaning.
Films:
1920 (2 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1908 (2 min)
Austrian Film Museum
1948 (3 min)
Film Museum Pablo Ducrós Hicken
circa 1921 (5 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l Ain
1913 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1966 (6 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1960 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1957 (1 min)
Kansallinen Audiovisuaalinen Instituutti
2019 (2 min)
Filmoteca de la UNAM
1978 (4 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1961 (1 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
circa 1980 (4 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1997 (3 min)
ECPAD - Établissement de Communication et de Production Audiovisuelle de la Défense
2022 (6 min)
Cinémathèque française
circa 1970 (3 min)
Australian Center for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Elena Iannetti - Filmarchiv Austria
Living with lines (87 min)
Things don´t just exist, they happen. We are in a world made up of interconnections between existences and experiences, between lines and nodes - writes the anthropologist Tim Ingold. This programme shows a variety of views of different lines. Conversations over the line, school kids in lines, lines that are used to pull up and adjust the sails. A train along the railway lines transforms the spectator-traveler into an intrepid explorer. The slacklining walker and his balancing act in the air on a thin and floating rope above the turbulent interwar period in the late 1920s. Lines on artisans sweating foreheads, fully engaged in an act of creation. In bullfighting a white line circumscribes an area which reveals soon a space of death and misfortune. In The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari the abstract set and excessive visual style with distorted perspective and falling lines are an escape or break from reality. These lines emphasize the claustrophobic interior space and the state of mind. Neruda´s lines try to imitate nature in its creative processes, like direct manifestations of natural energy. A silkworm gives life to the raw silk cocoon, consisting of a single continuous line.
Films:
1943 (15 min)
IWM
1922 (10 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
1958 (1 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1909 (7 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée
1920 (1 min)
Österreichisches Filmmuseum
1957 (3 min)
Institut Jean Vigo - Cinémathèque euro-régionale
1917 (4 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1919-1920 (7 min)
Bundesarchiv
2004 (34 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1936 (5 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
Didi Liang - Eye Filmmuseum
Immigrant stories: life doesn't always move in a straight line (67 min)
It's easy to imagine life moving in a straight line—making plans, following the steps, and hoping everything turns out to be what we want. Yet for immigrants who choose to go abroad, life is full of twists and turns when they decide to leave their home countries. Optimistic at first, they embark on an adventure to find a better home. Soon they discover that everything is different than they imagined: they need to build a new life from the ground up, which means learning a new language, adapting to a new culture, and finding a new home or a job. After a long process of assimilation, they again face mundane and repetitive lives, constantly negotiating their identities.
Films:
1914 (13 min)
Irish Film Institute
2005 (4 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1973 (17 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1978 (16 min)
UCLA Film& Television Archives
2004 (8 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1928? (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Sébastien Ronceray - Cinémathèque française
What we perceive, what's happens. (71 min)
The relationship between humans and nature is nourished by what they perceive, what they see, what they touch and what they smell. The plants, according to the seasons, transform by their scent our relationship to the nature that we cross. Used, abused by man, nature changes its scent, transforms itself. Become consumable, its smell evolves, sometimes goes astray, refocuses towards ritual forms, or manipulations for consumption. Other smells appear, more tenuous, stranger, suggesting a change. Even films can undergo these mutations. Masked by the destruction, the smells by modifying themselves, become harbingers, announcing also the revolts. Before the changes, something in the wind tells us that it is time... Ce que l’on perçoit, ce qui advient. Le rapport entre les humains et la nature se nourrit de ce que l’ils en perçoivent, de ce qu’ils en voient, de ce qu’ils touchent et ce qu’ils sentent. Les végétaux, selon les saisons, transforment par leur senteur notre rapport à la nature que l’on traverse. Utilisée, malmenée par l’homme, la nature change d’odeurs, se transforme. Devenue consommable, son odeur évolue, s’égare parfois, se recentre vers des formes rituelles, ou des manipulations pour consommations. D’autres odeurs apparaissent, plus ténues, plus étranges, laissant entendre un changement. Même les films peuvent subir ces mutations. Masquée par la destruction, les odeurs en se modifiant, deviennent des signes avant-coureurs, annonçant aussi les révoltes. Avant les changements, quelque chose dans le vent nous dit qu’il est temps…
Films:
ca 1950 (11 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1935 (5 min)
Cinemateca portuguesa
1935 (7 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1903 (3 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1926 (3 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
ca 1960 (5 min)
Filmmuseum Vienne
1898 (1 min)
Portale Cinema Muto Italiano
1906 (7 min)
Cinématek de Belgique
1919 (1 min)
Musée Albert-Kahn
1970 (25 min)
Cinémathèque française
Elena Albuerne - UvA University of Amsterdam
The Skin as a Canvas (79 min)
Skin as Canvas In Spanish skin means piel and it comes from the Latin word pellis. This is related to an Indoeuropean root: pel-6 also meaning piel, membrana and it derived in filme or película. In Old English filmen also referred to membrane, thin skin, foreskin. Today one of the film’s connotations is also the “thin layer of something on a surface.” In this program I want to emphasize how this skin/membrane can be equated to a painting canvas. In order to be used, it has to be prepared: stretch, seal and prime. Afterwards different techniques can be applied to create something. By doing that we are adding texture and topography to it. The same applies to our skin. We scrub creams and oils to make it softer or substances to change its pigmentation. We stretch it to be fitter and to change it to comply with aesthetic impositions. There are multiple ways to use and abuse the skin for commercial or aesthetic reasons. The first short, Mujer simulando el revelado de una fotografía, illustrates the film development in a dark room to equal the skin preparation. In that sense the Chomon’s piece also adds in that direction. While Les Paris de mannequins shows us the commercial use of the skin, Iconos de la fotografía: Gertrudis de Moses includes images of body skin with diverse topographies made by a female gaze in Chile even before Surrealism became an artistic movement. De vita händerna also explores the body in distint situations. Petite chronique de l’image (1995/2002) depicts the flexibility of this human canvas through dans. Finally, Bits and Pieces Nr. 518 exposes the decay in the membrane/skin of films.
Films:
1926 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional de México
1906 (2 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1962 (11 min)
La Cinematheque Francaise
2019 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1950 (13 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
2014 (38 min)
Centre Pompideu
1927 (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Emese Erdos - National Film Institute Hungary - Film Archive
Lines, squares, pyramids (54 min)
Line, lines, triangle, triangles, square, squares, cube, cubes, pyramids, buildings, architecture, civilization. Pyramids are all over the world. Egypt, Sudan, Mali, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Iran, China, Cambodia Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, El Salvador, Peru, USA, France, Greece, Italy and Spain. Pyramid of Djoser – Egypt, the first (known) architect was Imhotep. The Djoser was built in the 27th century BC. What are the ancient, the recent and the eternity architecture rules? How did architecture effect civilization? How does civilization, our society effect architecture? How long the pyramids can survive? How much the monumental buildings amazed people in the 20th century, how much it amaze still? Guests to invite for discussion: archaeologist, architect, anthropologist.
Films:
1923 (6 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1955 (1 min)
National Film Institute Hungary - Film Archive
1968 (2 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
Guillaume Boure - AMIA – ACOB
// tram lines // tramlines // (29 min)
||Tram lines: the parallel railway tracks that a tram runs on. ||Tramlines: continuous vertical scratch lines running through multiple frames of a film. There is a school of thought that considers these scratches as a part of cinematographic heritage. As it is known that earlier films were shown to the audience this way, some see these defects as an authentic patina of earlier times. Others see the scratches as meaningless and annoying defects, that should be eliminated. ||There are times when one must pick a side. Where do we draw the line between freedom and responsibility when programming films from conflicting cultures/languages in wartime?
Films:
2002 (10 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
1938 (19 min)
Gosfilmofond of Russia
Tomaz Burlin - Collectif Jeune Cinéma
Expériences du sensible et de l odeur (40 min)
Cumulation des images, évocations du sensible, cette sélection des quelques œuvres expérimentales, à cheval entre les années soixante et soixante-dix, met en avant la nature, le végétal mais aussi l’artifice et l’humain. Ce sont des films tantôt loufoques, tantôt poétiques, où une part importante est donnée au son, à la musique et au bruit. En partant du sous-bois humide de la forêt luxuriante australienne où défilent les images des plantes et petits insectes dans un film qui se veut plus poétique que pédagogique, on passe aux tourbillons d’œillets indiens et de spirales de lumière enrobées par le son du sitar. Le voyage sensoriel continue au long de scénettes absurdes : des musiciens, un repas/happening musical, des jeux enfantins au milieu de la ferme, et puis encore l’Atlantique, la flore marine et côtière, la faune des près et le jardin, havre intime de l’être. Respirez, sentez les narines pleines d’images.
Films:
1973 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1970 (3 min)
BFI National Archive
1975 (13 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Bárbara Carvalho - CESEM - NOVA FCSH
Orange Gatherings (73 min)
Colour as a passive meeting point drives this programme. The subtle presence of colour can either pass unnoticed or be the keystone to the memory of an event that implies, forces, or demands the gathering of people, depending on the meaning of the object or the scene. The gathering can be one of celebration and togetherness (the barbecue fire, the sunset, the parade); it can be one of reconstruction after a catastrophe (fire); it can be one of labour (peach canning, cashew tree); it can be one of everyday life (the clay pots, the small fireplace); and it can be one of enchantment and uniqueness of the event (lava from the volcano). The gatherings around the colour orange suggest the multiplicity of sensations and meanings that can be attributed to an event, as well as the relevance that colour can have in these moments. Fire can provoke an encounter or it can be a call to one, lava can be catastrophic or captivating, the Orange Walk can be a moment of togetherness or of social and political tension. Throughout these films, we find this multiplicity of sensations, meanings, and references. And just like their content, these forms of gathering seek to aborb the synaesthesia implied in the idea of orange through the encounter of people in image and choral songs, and the appeal to the imagination of colour.
Films:
1928 (12 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1914 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1916 (3 min)
Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum
1933 (6 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1962 (8 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1968 (21 min)
Cinémathèque française
1962 (22 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
Fernanda Parrado - Cinemateca Brasileira
Anamnesis: The Art of Recreation (45 min)
Inspired by the ancient Greek myth of the Moirai (the Fates), who were said to weave the thread lines of human destiny, this selection of home movies invites us to explore the diverse life experiences of ordinary people. Appropriating these forgotten memories into our own personal perceptions, we create new connections and meaning, drawing from a variety of human experiences. These films offer a unique opportunity to reflect on our individual life lines and the ways in which they intersect with the broader threads of human history.
Films:
1961 (5 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1906 (2 min)
BFI National Archive
1948 (9 min)
Academy Film Archive
1968 (1 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1927 (4 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1933 (12 min)
The Museum of Modern Art - Department of Film
1945 (12 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Angus O Macdonald - Toronto Metropolitan University
So Sweet and So Cold (64 min)
I close my eyes and see a fresh fruit dangling pendulously on a branch. From outside my vision someone’s hand stretches to pluck the fruit, before slumping to the ground and devouring it, protected from the afternoon heat by the cool shade of the tree. This is a fantasy, a storybook image of a tranquil grove where life is slow and peaceful, where a sweet treat is never more than a step and a jump away. There is an unattainable romance to this image of rural idyll, an induced yearning for watching the sweet yield of trees, vines, and bushes being picked. This program, which takes its name from the final line of William Carlos Williams' poem This Is Just To Say, collects films that feature scenes of harvest. Each in its own way depicts the setting of an orchard or farm and the careful picking of fruit, presented by way of archival films from around the world and across years. That said, this program aims neither to fetishize manual agricultural work, nor to flatten or obscure the diverse social, cultural, and economic conditions present at the time these films were captured. By fixing the gesture of a hand outreached towards a hanging fruit across time and geography, this selection works to spotlight the subtext and peripheral action that exists within each film. The hope is to make evident the other events, both small and large, that play out around the ceaseless harvesting of fruit. Images of military action, of industrialization and the tension between modern and traditional, of racial dynamics, of family structures and gender roles. These all skirt the edges of the frame yet indelibly shape the task of agricultural harvest and complicate our initial imagined serenity.
Films:
1960s (2 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1955 (4 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1950 (11 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1917 (15 min)
EYE Filmmuseum
1955 (8 min)
Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna
1944 (2 min)
The East Anglian Film Archive
1938 (10 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1928 (7 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1918 (5 min)
Imperial War Museums
Maria De Filippis - Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Rouge, sensuelle, blessée, séparée. Quatre mouvements autour de la peau (70 min)
Il s'agit d'un parcours entre la matérialité de la peau humaine (en italien "pelle") et celle de la pellicule, "peau" du cinéma. Rouge. Je ressens des émotions, j'ai chaud, ma peau rougit, elle montre son âme, s'expose aux autres. Cette surface naturelle, prise pour acquise, devient soudainement présente, se révèle aux autres. De la même façon, au fil du temps le film argentique peut virer au magenta : son teint montre une face nouvelle, différente, perturbante et pourtant inéluctable. Sensuelle. Porte entre deux mondes intimes, la peau est le lieu de passage d'un désir. Le sens du toucher, l'odorat, les perceptions physiques révèlent une passion. La matière du cinéma peut tenir du fétichisme : envie de toucher, développer la pellicule, garder les sens actifs sous l'impulsion d'une matière vivante à contrôler, maîtriser, exposer. Blessée. Surface aisément atteignable, partie externe d'un corps chargé d’histoire, la peau devient la cible de violences qui visent un plus grand univers de valeurs, qui demeure lui inaccessible. Violence de l'oubli, de la mégarde, du délaissement. La peau du cinéma (pellicule) manifeste elle aussi ses blessures (rayures, poussière, décomposition). Séparée. Contour, périmètre, enveloppe du corps humain, l'épiderme tout comme la pellicule marque une séparation. Par sa matérialité la pellicule impose sa présence, le cinéma qui s'en passe impose par conséquent son contraire : l’absence. L'absence de matière comme métaphore d'une séparation amoureuse, la tristesse de se séparer de la matière du cinéma argentique, telle la mélancolie de la peau d’un amant parti.
Films:
1931 (1 min)
Memobase
1973 (9 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1989 (5 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne - Gwarez filmoù
1956 (12 min)
BFI National Archive
1986 (15 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1908 (9 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1966 (11 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
2010 (8 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
Jean-Benoit PECHBERTY - CICLIC CENTRE-VAL DE LOIRE
Nourriture, cuisine et alimentation de l'olfactif au culturel (90 min)
Le terme « odeur » renvoie à l’idée de parfum, de senteur, d’arômes, que ce soit au sujet des aliments, de la nourriture, de la cuisine et de ses spécialités, des marchés ou encore les rites du repas, les célébrations ou les festivités culinaires. L’idée de ce programme est donc d’explorer les aspects olfactifs et culinaires mais aussi d’étudier les aspects culturels, sociétaux et sociaux de la nourriture, de la cuisine et de l’alimentation.
Films:
1928 (13 min)
Library of Congress
1938 (6 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1941 (8 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1919 (1 min)
Musée départemental Albert-Kahn
1940 (1 min)
Cinémathèque suisse / Archives fédérales suisses
1957 (9 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1966 (43 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Clara Gustavsson - Swedish Film Institute
Orange – alarm, amber and activism (90 min)
Orange, a color used in many contexts that takes on a variety of meanings and evokes different emotions. Due to its potential visual intensity, orange is for example used to attract attention in traffic signs, which has taught us to react attentively to the color itself. At the same time, the kindred nuances of amber was, in the silent film era, used as one of the most common tinting colors, often giving film scenes a warm, harmonic impression. In a religious context, the color is not least associated with the robes of the Buddhist monk. The origin is said to lie in the fact that the textile was dyed using readily available natural dyestuff based on bark, roots, flowers, fruits and different types of soil. The result worked perfectly to symbolize a new beginning; a sunrise captured in a cloth. The name of the commune Orange in southeastern France has nothing to do with the color (nor the fruit). Rather, it is explained as a French distortion of the name Aurenja from the medieval dialect of the area, but the color has nevertheless been connected throughout history with the city and the principality of Orange. The principality also gave name to House of Orange-Nassu, the reigning house of the Netherlands, which is why the color is associated with the Netherlands as well. The same dynasty - and color - inspired the Orange Order, the Protestant fraternal order that are marching in Orange walks.
Films:
1961 (12 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1916 (12 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1964 (12 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1962-1965 (21 min)
National Library of Scotland
1913 (33 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Fabrizio Mostardi - University of Bologna
Strokes of pencil (71 min)
Phenakistoscope and zootropes existed since decades before Lumière brothers’ invention. These instruments made use of drawings that, shown in rapid succession, looked like they were mooving: animation is a genre born long before cinema existed. Experimental movies from the 20th century used simple lines and geometrical shapes as a stimulus for the imagination and, through movement and morphing, went against the notion of geometry as an abstract and rigid domain, but rather as something in motion and sort of organic. In this selection you will see films in which the strokes that form the characters and objects are thick and easily distinguisheable, and show how animation has been intended as the most suitable genre for easy entertainment enjoyment, comedy, political satire, rhythmic expression and storytelling for didactic porpouses.
Films:
1932 (2 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1966 (6 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1976 (3 min)
BFI
1973 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1928 (11 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1923 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1925 (6 min)
UCLA
1916 (9 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
1951 (20 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
Kati Vuks - Film Archive of the National Archives of Estonia
Skin and beauty (51 min)
This program gives a little glimpse of the world of beauty and ideals depicted in film works through decades and societies. Healthy and beautiful skin appears to be one of the cornerstones of the concept of beauty. What exactly is beautiful and desired has changed in time and varies culturally. In some parts of the world, people worship the sun and idealize tanned bodies (Osram Höhensonne,1959), in others people whiten their skin to look prettier. There are still tribes today that use skin embroidery and tattooing (like in Bakuba, 1952) to decorate themselves. In the Western society television, advertisements and beauty magazines constantly tell women (and men) every day what they should do (and buy, just like in Dorothy Gray "Satura", 1960 and many other commercials) in order to get closer to finding the holy grail - beauty and youth forever. They also convince us that our skin needs constant care, treatment, countless beauty products and of course, a lot of effort - that's where the beauty industry is profiting tremendously. Nobody wants to look old, feel old, get old. We despise wrinkles and the beauty industry offers several remedies to fight “aging” (The Rejuvenation Treatment, 1926). The desire to stay young and firm and fit has become a norm, especially for women. The male gaze has been haunting women for a long time. Beauty now (2007) offers a satirical view about contemporary attitudes towards female beauty. But surely also men have expectations and beauty standards imposed on them. Muscle Beach (1948) takes an interesting look into the subculture of bodybuilders and gymnasts who also represent the body cult. Fitter shape, firmer skin, better bodies.
Films:
1964 (2 min)
Fondazione Cineteca Italiana
1959 (2 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1952 (18 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1957 (2 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1960 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1957 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1968 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1965 (1 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1980 (2 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1921 (8 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
2007 (4 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1948 (9 min)
Academy Film Archive
Hao-Chun Yang - Taiwan Film and Audiovisual Institute
Crossing the Lines: Life in Exile and Limbo (90 min)
Lines, be they geographical or cultural, are man-made demarcations used to divide groups, nation states, or ideological camps into separate political entities. Though shifting and arbitrary, they are often dictated by and materialize the presence of those who are in power. National borders, wartime front lines, and racial boundaries, all legitimize the myth of an existing social order and hierarchy. People who do not fit squarely into these pre-determined limits are usually the voiceless and disenfranchised minorities. // This mini-program is intended to investigate the liminal state of individuals who are forced to “cross the lines” in crucial historical moments such as WWII, Vietnam War, or even climate crisis. From mobilized racial minorities who fought the wars for their Anglo-Saxon compatriots (but were later ditched to the side), to Japanese immigrant families put in interim camps due to their suspected lack of loyalty, the friend-or-foe logic drawing the lines often effaced the humanity and dignity of those who were caught in between the two worlds. // This curation, on one hand, comprises government war propagandas propounding the promising ideals of social integration and harmony; one the other, it includes works that illuminate on the harsh reality of war and the refugees it creates. Besides documentary and oral history, the selection also incorporates other forms such as animation, fiction and experimental films to touch upon different aspects of exile in post-Cold War and contemporary contexts, hoping to connect the dots and map out the terrains of both external displacement (to foreign territories) and internal displacement (within one's own country.)
Films:
2020 (8 min)
British Film Institute
1990 (20 min)
The Spielberg Jewish Film Archive
1945 (26 min)
National Archives and Records Administration (US National Archives)
2010 (3 min)
Australian Centre of Moving Image
1945 (21 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1968 (4 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1977 (8 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
Espen Bale - BFI
Lines (of Movement) (83 min)
Lines that divide, lines that connect, lines of geography, lines that are man-made. Lines that carve up, lines that imbue meaning, that create disjuncture and illustrate symmetry. At it's most basic, most primal level, film can elucidate the very fundamental binary of light and shadow - the way a simple line can create something out of nothing. These films, though very different in form and function, display the broad sense of 'lines' and the many uses and meanings we find for them. They help us divide up the natural and not so natural world - for agriculture and transport, into institutions and distinct territories - and also allow us to bring disorder and playfulness too. In the more experimental works we see a desire to play with images at their most basic - lines of light, of shadow, and of colour, as they break up the screen, flow through space(s) or play across them. In the spirit of Gilles Deleuze, it is also interesting to look at lines of movement - how the camera moves through a certain space, creating certain moods or move a narrative forward or in the case of 'Video 360' choose our own line of movement through the virtual space, giving a unique line - of story, travel and meaning - to each interaction.
Films:
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
2009 (10 min)
Austrian Film Museum
1978 (10 min)
Yale Film Archive
1974 (1 min)
BFI
1959 (8 min)
ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image)
1928 (1 min)
La Cinémathèque française
1936 (11 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
2019 (1 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
1969? (10 min)
DFF (Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1972-1981 (23 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Noemie Jean - CINEMATHEQUE FRANÇAISE / MUSEE DU CINEMA
Une balade olfactive à travers les champs (81 min)
Des terres émanent des odeurs qui nous évoquent bien souvent des souvenirs : L’odeur du foin juste coupé en passant à côté d’un champ pendant les moissons ou encore celle des fleurs en jachères. La nature se révèle par son aspect sauvage, mais aussi à travers le savoir-faire des paysans qui travaillent la terre. Les cultures évoluent au cours de l’année durant laquelle les champs son labourés, ensemencés, récoltés. A chaque saison ses couleurs et ses odeurs qui embaument les narines du promeneur.
Films:
1924 (13 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
ca. 1950 (11 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1959 (16 min)
Cinémathèque française
1976 (41 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Furman Caspar - FINA
Imprints of LIfe (91 min)
The theme Imprints of Life in a category "Smell" takes us to the titles that bring us close to the memories and traditions, impressions of the places we have been to, interiours, parks and smells of different seasons we experience being outside. Interious can be of leisure, of work and of play. Exteriours are cities with their different corners and activities but also nature, like sea and flowers. All the impressions we get from different places and their familiar smell are endless and transport us each time far away, memories come back, where we enjoyed delicious food or spent wonderful moments together with loved ones. When we see the archival films of cities we always wonder how it must have smelled by then in the different street corners, especially at markets or parks. The smell is also very much associated to older objects, like furniture or just old books, which have a strong bond to archives and archival films
Films:
1932 (57 min)
Det Danske film institut
1928 (10 min)
Cineteca de Chile
1932 (6 min)
Cinematheque Francaise
1961 (7 min)
European Film Gateway/Serbisches Film Institute
1956 (10 min)
Unam
1898 (1 min)
Portale Cinema Muto Italiano
Jean-François Mary - Cinémathèque de Nice
Peaux (42 min)
À la fois constituée d’un nombre impressionnant d’orifices minuscules et à la fois totalement imperméable, la peau se joue de biens des paradoxes. Enveloppe qui nous abrite, nous cherchons nous-même à l’abriter. Elle nous permet de ressentir la douceur… mais également la douleur. Elle détecte les stimuli qui seront interprétés et transformés par le cerveau. Nous la soignons, nous l’entretenons, elle se donne en spectacle mais, au fil du temps, elle devient inexorablement oripeaux. Mais qu’est-ce qu’on ne ferait pas pour la peau ? Publicité, documentaire, reportages et film d’animation constituent ce programme.
Films:
1957 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket
1954 (11 min)
CSC – Archivio Nazionale Cinema Impresa
1970 (1 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1947 (17 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1988 (9 min)
Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Film Centre
Mosa Mpetha - Hyde Park Picture House
Smell it? Sell it! (44 min)
A short and light programme of archive adverts from around the world, that use our senses of smell and taste for sales. Whether it be the fear of smelling bad, the exaggerated smell of good food, or the smell of danger, these films use a variety of methods and styles to have us pay attention or get our wallets out. Some use standard formats such as close ups of food, idealistic yet eery family settings. Some play on our concerns and fears. Then there are those that swing left of field and use the bizarre and surreal to grab our attention. Who knows what is going on, does it really matter? Our attention is caught! Adverts are so recognisable as a form, and can feel dated quite quickly, which can make them feel absurdist and a humorous experience when watching today. The opposite to how we feel watching most adverts of the current time. This selection also makes us consider the changes and constants in advertising, do these products and foods look as appetizing now? Why are so many adverts across the world and different time periods so similar? It begs the question are we as a people predictable and easily manipulated, or is the advertising game just stuck in its ways? Some of these films do not have subtitles, but honestly you do not need it.
Films:
1973 (2 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1958 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1968 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1993 (4 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1897 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1954 (6 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1960s (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Unknown (1 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1939 (3 min)
Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung
1960 (2 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1974 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1953 (3 min)
Deutsches Filminstitut - DIF
1958 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
Unknown (17 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Rayjay Lee - TAIWAN FILM AND AUDIOVISUAL INSTITUTE (TFAI)
This Film Smells (77 min)
What follows after foul odour is never a pretty sight. Smells that are repellent have become synonyms to negative phenomena, and can usually leave a stronger impression than pleasant scents. Though comforting environments like hotels and fancy restaurants may be more appealing, the use of elements equivalent to foul odour creates more impact on the audience. The sight of ghettos, animal farms, and labour, instinctively links with pain and misery, contributing to the dramatic nature of cinema. These metaphors, when applied on screen, strengthens the missing fifth sense (without the help of smell-o-vision), allowing us to imagine with our nose, further compassionating with the content. This selection seeks to observe the similarity in themes when using "smelly" factors, and to explore its effectiveness of connecting sight to smell. "A Workingman’s Death" and "Travaux de la ferme" attacks with blood, sweat and manure; "Daydream Therapy", "3 To Go: Judy" and "An Innocent Theft" contrasts the urban and rural environment; an unsanitary home hints at the mental state of "Five Year Diary, reel 22: A Short Affair & Going Crazy"’s narrator; and "Findus: Fish Fingers" questioning attempt to increase appetite with the fishy scent of a beloved snacks’ ingredient in its natural state.
Films:
2002-2005 (2 min)
Deutsches Filminstitut - DIF
1908 (2 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1977 (8 min)
UCLA Library Film and Television Archive
1969 (27 min)
National Film and Sound Archive
1912 (13 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1970s (1 min)
IFI Archive
Camille Carlier - FOCAL International
Orange lights (56 min)
Orange on the road means you must stop if you’re able to but orange can also be the colour of controlling traffic lights on the streets. A code of conduct. How would you behave? Time travellers you need to grab the steering wheel of your car, your bicycle’s handlebar. All the traffic lights are orange on the world’s road. A concerning and exciting suspension. No one really knows if we should stop or speed up. No one really knows how to conduct themselves. But educational and public information productions from the past are there to show us a way. Often related to safety and government-commissioned, these films drew a line between good and bad to ensure social peace and order. An interesting “how-to-be-in-the-right” depending on societies, times, and political contexts. At last, an expression of “good citizens” willing to be “good citizens”, “good workers”, “good employees”. This programme offers a few examples of what the You from another time, another place should have been and done to be “in the right”.
Films:
c.1950s (1 min)
Academy Film Archive
1957 (12 min)
Library of Congress
1975 (1 min)
IFI Archive
1950 (4 min)
BFI
1970s (1 min)
Indiana University
1943 (16 min)
IWM
1964 (9 min)
NFSA
1960s (9 min)
ACMI Collection
1978 (1 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1929 (2 min)
Moving Image Research Collections
Caterina Palpacelli - Immagine Ritrovata
ORANGE BLOSSOM (82 min)
Does talking about marriage mean talking about love? If only we knew what love is. A very powerful question, very frequent and perhaps at the same time so impossible to answer. Probably it is precisely this feature of it, so evanescent, that makes it still so interesting in our eyes. This program does not want to answer the question, but rather, to insinuate in the viewer a personal reflection, on what it means to love and decide to live a life together.
Films:
1907 (1 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1910 (12 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
2005 (2 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1968 (5 min)
Yale Film Archive
1969 (4 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1980 (49 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
Luís Mendonça - Cinemateca Portuguesa - Museu do Cinema
skINs OUT (83 min)
"Ce qu'il y'a de plus profond en l'homme, c'est la peau", said Paul Valéry. Here we have a display of several types of skins, all ages and with multiple functions (clothing as a second skin to our naked skin*, film as a second skin to the skin of reality, etc.), and from a myriad of species (humans and animals mixed together), sometimes being played out, wearing each other. Getting sick, getting old, masking itself, just being or exhibiting itself, perfect (with or without make up) or defected (scars or aging wrinkles). What a Zoo! (I note that in the film from Cinemateca Portuguesa, the narrator compares the skins of the animals in the Lisbon Zoo with, for instance, swimsuits or types of hats.) * I included two BFI films (sorry...), if I really have to exclude one, it is the first one, "Weavers in Kilbarchan, Scotland".
Films:
1926 (1 min)
BFI - British Film Institution
2019 (1 min)
Austrian Film Museum
1952 (18 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa - Museu do Cinema
1912 (6 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1978 (7 min)
NFSA Films
2015 (5 min)
BFI - British Film Institute
1977 (1 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1909 (18 min)
Library of Congress Online
1997 (26 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
João Moucheira - Lusófona University of Lisbon
Skin surface, skin deep (84 min)
This program aims to show different approaches of dealing with / filming the body, its surface and its depths, in short length films of diversified nature (educational, documentary, commercial or artistic). It begins with a long commercial film from the 50’s, advertising cosmetics for women, but promoted as an hygiene and beauty care educational film, showed in schools and women’s groups. A typical product of post-war American way of conceiving the «ideal woman». The 2 subsequent films portray the equivalent post-war American ideal of male beauty: the muscled man. The first is a documentary about the bodybuilding culture, showing the typical middle class beach day (in Santa Monica, California), filled with exhibitionist bodybuilders (not only male, though), filmed with a musical funny comment by the future famous director Joseph Strick, assisted by the also well known director Irving Lerner. The other is an 1968 campy TV commercial, starred by Mae West, surrounded by a group of muscled male fans. The program goes on with a deeper exploration of the skin, by presenting a Swedish film from 2018, directed by Dalwid Ullgren , which looks at gay saunas in the pre-AIDS era (the main action takes place in a Stockholm gay sauna in 1981) as safe places for exploration of desires and skin sensuality – although constrained by strict rules –, but also as «liberator» from monogamy ties (therefore, with damaging consequences on relationship commitment). A logical continuation of the previous film in this session is a plunge in the most deeper skin, the territory of the venereal diseases. We will show an American animation film, with educational / scientific purposes, about syphilis and gonorrhea (it was produced in the pre-AIDS era, in 1973), in a good humored and light tone (the plagues have cartoonish figures, e.g. syphilis is portrayed as a vampire, in Dracula outfits). The last film in this program is about another skin issue that goes beyond surface, entering in the realms of anthropology and politics. It is also an American animated cartoon, from the immediate post-war period (1946), and also with an education purpose: it aims to explain that there are no basic differences between the races of the world (the human colours of skin) and that, across the history, the only differences evidenced were due to environmental influences. It was based in “Races of Mankind”, a pamphlet by Ruth Benedict and Gene Weltfish.
Films:
1951 (28 min)
National Film Preservation Foundation (U.S. Congress)
1948 (10 min)
Academy Film Archive
1968 (1 min)
Indiana University (Media Collections Online)
2018 (13 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1973 (21 min)
National Archives
1946 (11 min)
Indiana University (Media Collections Online)
Anja Banko - Slovenian Cinematheque
Variations in orange: memory, nostalgia, splendour and a strike of jealousy (79 min)
As usual, it all started with a fairy-tale. With an adventure, full of golden riches. Then a glimpse of light and colour. Orange. The colour of the afternoon sun. The colour of idly enjoying a day off. The hair, the grass, the skin, glowing in the golden sun, which turns into an image of a burning fire. A concert of legends only in image, a document of time, accompanied by the sound of memory. The gaiety and frivolity of a family reunion in the late summer garden. Just before the nightfall, a lover watches her love, drifting away with another in the setting sun. A story of a fateful romance, which ends in wild red flames of destructive jealousy, the ultimate shade of love.
Films:
1927 (6 min)
National Film Archive of Japan - Japanese animated film classics
unknown (1 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1973 (10 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1969 (26 min)
Library of Congress
1940s (20 min)
Australian Centre of Moving Image (ACMI)
1911 (16 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
Kate Saccone - University of Amsterdam
Between the Body and the World (34 min)
The skin is the body’s largest organ, a multilayer tissue that acts as a protective barrier, performs important physiological functions, and exists as a critical (aging) surface. “As the edge between the body and the world,” film scholar Jennifer M. Barker writes, “the skin always functions as both a covering and an uncovering, because of its simultaneous proximity to the public world and to the secretive inner body.” This short program looks at some of the things we do with, to, and because of our skin. For example, we clean and embellish it, and whole industries (i.e., cosmetics, entertainment), as well as societal norms, are built around clean, unblemished, made up, and beautiful skin. While we cover up our skin with make-up and clothing, it is also something that can be revealed in provocative ways. One place where skin is always on display is the beach, when our bodily surfaces interact with sun, sand, sweat, and salt water. Moreover, the color of a person’s skin has, both historically and in the present day, regrettably and unjustly been something that has been used to categorize and limit others. Finally, skin, represented in the final two films by the surface of the celluloid film strip, can be scratched, damaged, and marked–and always transforms with time.
Films:
1971 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1904 (2 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
1985 (4 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1933 (2 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1948 (10 min)
Academy Film Archive
1964 (3 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1956 (3 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1923 (9 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
Julie Dragon - La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
"Faire peau neuve" (64 min)
« Faire peau neuve » (exp.) Déf. Changer sa façon d'être ; changer d'apparence ; changer de manière d'être ; se rénover entièrement ; devenir quelque chose ou quelqu'un de nouveau. Au début des cellules pigmentaires, la chrysalide se transforme, danse hypnotique, le drapée de la crevette craque, Elizabeth Taylor et Vivien Leigh muent sous technicolor, lotion, savon, la peau est douce, le « ulu » coupe, peaux écharnées, laine, cuir, les ciseaux du coiffeur sont un art, « peau contre peau » dira-t-il, ah la barbe !, qui se cache derrière le miroir ?, faisceaux noirs et blancs, l’écran s’éteint.
Films:
2017 (1 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1904 (2 min)
BFI
1911 (13 min)
Cineteca MNC - Torino
1895 (1 min)
FILMOTECA VALENCIANA - INSTITUT VALENCIÀ DE CULTURA
1964 (1 min)
Les Documents Cinématographiques
1939 (11 min)
The Danish Film Institute
1965 (1 min)
INDIANA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE
1930 (4 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1965 (1 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1953 (17 min)
Mémoire filmique Pyrénées-Méditerranée
1965 (2 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1912 (3 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse / Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1906 (2 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1928 (1 min)
Cinémathèque française
Florian Höhensteiger - Bundesarchiv
Long and winding roads (88 min)
Seen from miles above, streets seem to be the lines connecting all humankind and acting as threads binding the planet together. This program wants to explore the various ways roads have been shown in films all over the world in the past century. Starting out with beautiful aerial views from the California coast, we quickly shift to how such views were used in wars ever since the invention of the airplane: First targets were chosen from above, then the bombardments came from the sky as well and afterwards, arbitrary lines were drawn by the victorious parties. In times of peace, however, humans try to make everything possible to connect with each other and to access the most remote landscapes and their fellow man, be it through the construction of mountain roads in Iceland, bridges to Rio de Janeiro, or tunnels through the alps. Travelogs made specifically for car journeys through Mexico or home movies on holiday in New Guinea showcase the ease and beauty of traveling by car, which made travel affordable even for the working class and the idea of the road trip desirable. Yet, progress can also be seen in the inevitable traffic which comes along with prosperity, on the daily commute or in the holiday traffic to escape it all. In the end, streets are built to serve us all and this program makes a case for their reclamation. So go out on the street, to dance, to protest, to ride your soap box car, to connect with the person at the end of the road, at the end of the line!
Films:
1925 (5 min)
Academy Film Archive
? (3 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1966 (3 min)
Kvikmyndasafn Íslands
1982-83 (2 min)
Institut audiovisuel de Monaco
1973 (10 min)
Arquivo Nacional
? (2 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1971 (5 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1938 (11 min)
Filmoteca de la UNAM
1971 (9 min)
Österreichisches Filmmuseum
1960s (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1963 (1 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1953 (14 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1906 (1 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1983 (3 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1968 (13 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
Maria Coletti - CSC-Cineteca Nazionale
Peau à peau /Peu à peu (90 min)
La peau fait immédiatement penser à l'amour. Le début de l'amour commence avec un bisou, tout comme le début du cinéma commence par l'arrivée d'un train. Alors A Kiss in the Tunnel est le début parfait. Peau à peau/peu à peu, l’amour se transforme dans une promesse de mariage, un jeu de couple où, pour pouvoir gagner, il faut aussi se mettre dans la peau de l'autre. Nous voici donc à la comédie romantique en travesti de The ABC of Love, dans laquelle une jeune femme essaie d'apprendre à son fiancé timide comment courtiser une femme et finit par découvrir à quel point il est difficile d'être un homme. Le jeu de l'amour et des apparences se complique quelques années plus tard dans le film Lovemania, où l’amour c’est comme une maladie, une folie. Un jeune couple nouvellement marié doit se changer de peau et se faire passer pour quelqu'un d'autre, afin de recueillir l'héritage d'un oncle, qui se dit contre tout mariage, seulement pour découvrir à la fin que l’oncle en question n'a pas d'argent. Le programme se termine par une vision de science-fiction, avec What’s the World Coming to?, dans un futur où les femmes ont pris la place des hommes dans la société... mais avoir changé de peau ne change pas les stéréotypes, les rôles et les conséquences du mariage ! The skin immediately makes one think of love. Love begins with a kiss, just as cinema begins with the arrival of a train. Then A Kiss in the Tunnel is the perfect start. Skin to skin/little by little, love turns into a promise of marriage, a couple's game where, in order to win, you also have to put yourself in the other person's shoes. So here we are at The ABC of Love's romantic comedy en travesti, in which a young woman tries to teach her shy fiancé how to court a woman and ends up discovering just how hard it is to be a man. The game of love and appearances becomes more complicated a few years later in the film Lovemania, where love is like a disease, a madness. A newly married young couple must change their skins and pretend to be someone else, in order to collect the inheritance of a rich uncle, who says he is against any marriage, only to find out in the end that the uncle has no money. The program ends with a sci-fi vision, with What's the World Coming to?, in a future where women have taken the place of men in society... but having changed skin does not change stereotypes, roles and consequences of marriage!
Films:
1899 (2 min)
BFI National Archive
1916 (43 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut – Danish Silent Film Portal
1924 (23 min)
Cinémathèque Royale du Belgique
1926 (22 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
Monique Faulhaber - Cinémathèque française
What's that smell Part 2 (43 min)
A program SMELL A film that you can smell, except among film archivists who handle it, is a rather rare experience. We have seen however in the history of cinema, processes aiming to accomplish a total cinematographic experience by soliciting the sense of smell, processes that have remained at an experimental stage, or single experiences that almost fall under the myth. From the Smell-O-Vision system, created in 1939, consisted in diffusing smells in theatres during a screening for the spectator to smell what he sees on film, to the Odorama famous Polyester (John Waters), in 1981, the olfactory cinema remains an object that has been thought by some misfits or marginals. But we still cannot smell what we are seeing on screen. Let’s think about how an image can conjure up smell in us. What’s that smell? It smells of film, ink, fruit, or flowers. It smells dirty laundry, cheese, or fish. it smells like candy, a perfume, a childhood memory. it smells of revolt and freedom.
Films:
1901 1904 (2 min)
Cinémathèque française
1916 (12 min)
archive de Norvège
1908 (4 min)
Fondation J. Seydoux-Pathé
1914 (11 min)
Fondation J. Seydoux-Pathé
1905 (2 min)
Fondation J. Seydoux-Pathé
Alexia Vanhée - Bibliothèque nationale de France
Oranges from all over the world: a gift for young and old people (61 min)
The orange is a fruit with multiple benefits, recommended for children (For Health and Happiness). When the apple represents the Forbidden Fruit, the orange would be the fruit of all the virtues (Mi-Wadi: Orange Tree). But the orange is also international. Its tree has as much place in the pleasure gardens of New Dehli (Government House Gardens - Edythe
Films:
1941 (11 min)
Library of Congress
1960 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1947 (1 min)
Imperial War Museums
1959 (12 min)
Jewish Film Archive
1965 (18 min)
European Film Gateway
1961 (5 min)
Images défense
1967 (1 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1930 (10 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1984 (2 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Matthieu Grimault - Cinémathèque française
What's that smell Part 1 (81 min)
A film that you can smell, except among film archivists who handle it, is a rather rare experience. We have seen however in the history of cinema, processes aiming to accomplish a total cinematographic experience by soliciting the sense of smell, processes that have remained at an experimental stage, or single experiences that almost fall under the myth. From the Smell-O-Vision system, created in 1939, consisted in diffusing smells in theatres during a screening for the spectator to smell what he sees on film, to the Odorama famous Polyester (John Waters), in 1981, the olfactory cinema remains an object that has been thought by some misfits or marginals. But we still cannot smell what we are seeing on screen. Let’s think about how an image can conjure up smell in us. What’s that smell? It smells of film, ink, fruit, or flowers. It smells dirty laundry, cheese, or fish. It smells like candy, a perfume, a childhood memory. It smells of revolt and freedom.
Films:
1982 (1 min)
Academy Film Archive
1937 (5 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1949 (2 min)
George Eastman Museum
1923 (26 min)
Cinémathèque française
1950 (11 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1959 (16 min)
Cinémathèque française
1972 (19 min)
Cinémathèque française
1966 (1 min)
KAVI
César Henrique de Souza Turim - Cinemateca Brasileira
Other Sweet Orange Trees (74 min)
A beloved novel and constant presence in the Brazilian collective unconscious, José Mauro de Vasconcelos’ My Sweet Orange Tree follows a little boy who befriends an orange tree to cope with the hardships he and his family endure. This story has been adapted twice for film and three times for TV in Brazil. Other Sweet Orange Trees offers a look at the complex, imaginative, and sensitive ways children approach many aspects of life such as social injustice, freedom, the subconscious, traumatic experiences, fear, desire, and the ephemeral. The program closes with “father of Brazilian Cinema” Humberto Mauro’s When I Was Eight, in which he reminisces about being a boy as the lyrics of the soundtrack lament the loss of his childhood under the orange trees.
Films:
1964 (12 min)
Academy Film Archive
1938 (14 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1910 (6 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
2007 (14 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1974 (5 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1928 (10 min)
Harvard Film Archive
2018 (2 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
1956 (11 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
Shiyang Jiang - New York University
Coffee and Cigarettes (52 min)
"Coffee and Cigarettes, what a combination.” Iggy Pop The program focuses on sponsored films for coffee and cigarettes in the US, UK, and Europe. More specifically, my thoughts are to question how the films use various approaches to attract, persuade, or educate the youth. The selection doesn’t attempt to represent the full spectrum of the genre, which would be impossible, but to highlight a few instances that are intriguing and inspiring. Coffee and cigarette commercials are as old as sponsored film itself. Admiral Cigarette (1897), one of the earliest commercials, casts four men in stereotypical clothes representing John Bull, a Native American, and Uncle Sam and a female smoker who distributes the cigarettes to unfold the banner “we all smoke”. Many sponsored films take shape of or allude to other well-known genres. The program includes films that are inspired by travelogue, documentary, and even public service announcements. These films sometimes intentionally mislead the audience to believe they belong to the borrowed genre. The moment of revelation is always amusing. Finally, cigarette commercials are as popular as they are controversial. Health departments have produced educational films that target children and youth against smoking. I also included one anti-smoking film in the program, which takes the disguise of pro-smoking.
Films:
unknown (1 min)
Academy Film Archive
1932 (3 min)
Norway National Library
1964 (19 min)
Indiana University Bloomington
1968 (2 min)
British Film Institute
1966 (27 min)
National Film Preservation Foundation
Hala Dagher - IESAV-Université Saint-Joseph
Filmer pour soi / Projeter pour les autres : pratiques et perspectives sur le cinéma amateur (90 min)
A l’ère digitale, la démocratisation des outils audiovisuels a permis de rendre accessible à tous la création d’images. Nous documentons ainsi au quotidien notre vie personnelle sans avoir besoin d’être un professionnel de l’image pour pouvoir le faire. Cette démarche personnelle rappelle qu’à ses origines, le cinéma avait été conçu pour filmer à titre personnel et non pour projeter publiquement. Comme pour la photographie, les premiers films de l’histoire répondent à une double démarche : représenter des scènes de la vie quotidienne et filmer le monde. Les premiers films sont ainsi réalisés par des géographes, des archéologues, des explorateurs,ou de riches particuliers. devenus cinéastes amateurs à une époque où la profession n’existait pas encore. Le film amateur assiste ainsi à la naissance du cinéma avant de se développer en dehors d’un dispositif professionnel et commercial de création et de diffusion cinématographiques. Conçu à titre individuel et s’adressant à un cercle privé ou restreint, le cinéma amateur a pourtant suscité un intérêt grandissant ces dernières décennies au sein de nombreuses institutions cinématographiques, dans le but de préserver une certaine mémoire personnelle, et par extension, une histoire collective. Le cinéma amateur se trouve ainsi décentré et exposé à d’autres regards que celui auquel il s’adressait à l’origine. De nombreux questionnements peuvent être relevés à l’égard de ce déplacement allant du visionnage privé vers une projection publique Quelles étaient les intentions originelles de filmer ? Qu’est ce qui a pu inspirer ces personnes à se filmer eux-mêmes ou leur entourage ? Sans doute avaient-ils conscience que leur vie personnelle relevait parfois de l’extraordinaire. Qu’il s’agisse de traverser son quartier en ruines après une guerre, de filmer la Cité Interdite en Chine pour la première fois de son histoire, ou de filmer ses proches avant qu’ils ne disparaissent, ils savaient que ces premières fois personnelles coïncidaient parfois des événements singuliers historiques.Il leur fallait ainsi garder une trace. Le cinéma amateur s’est développé à travers différents registres : le film de voyage, celui qui relate des événements historiques, les films de famille ou les ‘home-movies’, et le journal intime filmé.Cette sélection de films propose divers exemples illustrant ces différentes catégories Le premier film de ce programme a été réalisé par Auguste François à Yunnan en Chine entre 1901 et 1904.Auguste François est un diplomate français qui, grâce à sa profession voyage beaucoup en Amérique du Sud et en Asie. A travers ses différents périples, il réalise que ces traditions, ces richesses culturelles dont il est témoin, seront sans doute amenées à disparaître. Ce film est l’un des premiers à être tourné en Chine et donne à voir des images rares de l’époque : des processions religieuses, un enterrement, des scènes de rue qui témoignent de la vie sociale sous la dynastie Qing. Le second film a été réalisé entre 1939 et 1945, , par Victor Barbe, un cinéaste amateur. Croisant l’événement historique avec la vie sociale, ce film alterne des moments de la vie de son quartier, celle des civils avec des énervements historiques (mobilisation, occupation allemande, libération). Le troisième film de cette sélection investigue les archives de la famille Greffuhle et rend hommage au monde fictif de Proust, dont on commémore le centenaire de la mort cette année. Les Greffuhle, l’une des plus vieilles familles aristocratiques françaises, inspira à Proust certains protagonistes de la Recherche du temps perdu, les Guermantes. Ces films de famille datant du début du siècle dernier permettent de donner chair et vie à des personnes que nous ne connaissions qu’en tant que personnages fictifs. A travers des scènes de la vie quotidienne, il permet de porter un autre regard sur l’œuvre romanesque de Proust. S’immisçant dans le monde personnel d’un cinéaste, le dernier film de ce programme porte sur le journal intime filmé, et plus particulièrement sur celui d’Anne Charlotte Robertson. Cette artiste américaine passa du journal intime écrit au journal intime filmé dans les années 80. Bien qu’intitulé ‘The five year diary’, ce journal intime s’étend ainsi sur quinze années de sa vie. Ce film traverse ainsi une tranche de vie mettant en parallèle des éventements marquants (naissances, mort de proches, ruptures) avec des scènes de la vie quotidienne (sorties, conversations avec des amis, repas). Ce journal deviendra un projet artistique, se développant à travers une installation multimédia, qui comportait des extraits de ces vidéos, des pages de ses journaux intimes écrits ainsi que des chansons. Si cette sélection s’ intéressait au départ aux intentions de ces cinéastes, aux raisons qui les avaient poussés à filmer leur vie personnelle et leur entourage, il convient aussi de s’interroger sur la réception de ces films à notre époque. Nés en dehors d’un dispositif cinématographique professionnel et publique, que peuvent-ils nous apprendre sur la création cinématographique et comment changent-ils notre regard sur le monde ? On prend conscience ainsi qu’entre le moment où ils ont été filmés et celui ou nous les découvrons, les différents regards qui se sont posés sur ces films ont évolué. Ainsi, les films d’Auguste François ne représentent plus seulement des témoignages provenant de cultures ayant disparu, mais peuvent aussi être perçus maintenant comme des œuvres cinématographiques à part entière , par leurs qualités formelles et esthétiques. Les films amateurs ayant attrait à certains événements historiques ne se regardent plus seulement comme des films personnels, mais comme des documents historiques éclairant certains pages de l’histoire d’une lumière nouvelle. Les films de la famille Greffuhle ne témoignent plus de la vie d’une famille aristocratique française au début du siècle dernier, mais nous renseignent sur la source d’inspiration d’une œuvre romanesque. Les films d’Anne Charlotte Robertson passent du journal intime à l’œuvre artistique. Que s’est il passé entre ces deux regards, entre celui qui a filmé sa vie personnelle et celui qui regarde maintenant, étranger à ces moments intimes si singuliers ? Cette programmation s’ intéresse à ce basculement de l’intime vers le publique pour comprendre ainsi comment ce geste personnel qui consiste à filmer sa propre vie devient un document historique ou une œuvre pouvant susciter un intérêt publique.
Films:
1901-1904 (56 min)
La cinémathèque française
1939-1945 (12 min)
La Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1917 (5 min)
Centre national du cinema
1982 (17 min)
Harvard Film Archive
Zeinab AlHajj - Iesav - USJ
Re-ACT: Archive - Cinéma - Tourmente (90 min)
ردة الفعل، عنوان هذا المشروع الذي يختار مجموعة من الأفلام المتنوعة ومن مختلف البلدان حول العالم لتسليط الضوء على ردة فعل الشعوب على واقعها. إنّ ما تعيشه الشعوب الحالية إنما هو امتداد للتاريخ ليس إلا. وهذه الحركات الثورية لم تكن إلا لتغير الواقع المرير الذي عاشته وعايشته الشعوب وقتذاك وضحت لكي لا تتكرر أفعال الإستعمار والإحتـ ـلال والإستعباد والإنصياع. تخيلوا لو أنّ فعل شراء الناس لا يزال قائماً فيما بينهم لمجرد اللون، أو الدين، أو الجنس، أو اللغة.. أو أن العلم حكر على شعوب دون أخرى. وإنّ ما تعيشه بعض الشعوب حتى الآن من استعمار مقنع، وحروب باردة، واستبداد الحكام، وحتى الإحتـ ـلال، إنما هو جرحٌ؛ وأي جرح لا يؤذي صاحبَه. لأن هذه الحركات لا تزال قائمة، ولكي تبقى شعلة الثورة قائمة، فإن استذكار هذه الأفلام من برنامج ردة فعل [Re-ACT: Archive - Cinéma - Tourmente] هو لحثّ الناس بإلحاح على الثورة وردة الفعل القوية اتجاه الظلم والإستبداد والعنف. من الأرشيف إلى السينما لغة التعبير، عن الإضطراب؛ تمّ اختيار مجموعة من الأفلام التي تعرض قدرة المرأة خصوصاً في المجتمعات العربية التي تهمشها، وعن أساليب الثورة التقليدية من خلال المظاهرات وإثارة أعمال الشغب في الطرقات، إلى التعليم ورفض تكريس الجهل، إلى محاولة تفكيك تلك العقلية الإستعمارية والإستبدادية السائدة تحت مختلف العناوين الناعمة. أفلام سينمائية من الأرشيف عن بعض الإضطرابات في التاريخ. فيلم Cine tract؛ تمّ إنتاج الفيلم من قبل مجموعة SLON [Société pour le lancement des œuvres nouvelles] خلال فترة الإزدهار السياسي والإبداعي 1968، «لجعل السينما سلاحاً سياسياً في متناول الجميع» تم إنتاجه من خلال صور ثابتة إلتقطت في تولوز أثناء المظاهرات والتجمعات، بكاميرا 16 مم، فيلم صامت بالأسود والأبيض مدته 3 دقائق. فيلم Květnová revoluce 1945؛ هو من نوع سينما الهواة، يعرض مشاهد لحركة الناس في الشوارع والأحياء أثناء تواجد الجنود الألمان، ثم يعرض كيفية فرار الجنود وبعد ذلك كيف تتعامل الشرطة التشيكية مع الجنود الألمان، ثم مشاهد للناس ينظفون الشوارع بعد خروج الجنود والآليات العسكرية. فيلم Le Martyre de la France du nord-est؛ خلال الحرب العالمية الأولى تمّ تدمير مئات القرى والمدن شمال شرق فرنسا، وبات الناس يعيشون بين الأنقاض. يصور هذا الفيلم كيف كانت ردة فعل السكان على واقعهم المزري، رفضاً لمحاولة قتلهم معنوياً إذ عمد الألمان إلى تدمير منهجي من خلال قصف المنشآت الحيوية – الصناعية والزراعية، واستهداف المدارس وتهشيم الكنائس، وقطع الجسور. لكن ولكي يقول الفرنسيون أنهم لا يزالوا أحياء، يعرض الفيلم مشاهد لمرأة توزّع الحليب، ولأطفال يستخدمون الأقنعة الواقية من الغازات للذهاب إلى المدارس، بالإضافة إلى مشاهد من الطبيعة الفرنسية. فيلم Martin Luther King at Newcastle University؛ فيلم تحية لمارتن لوذر كينغ. وهو عبارة عن مشاهد لمارتن لوثر كينغ خلال حفل تخرجه من جامعة نيوكاستل في العام 1967؛ لأنه رمز لثورة الأفارقة. فيلم To live as free men؛ فيلم وثائقي عن مدرسة بنسلفانيا – للأميركيين الأفارقة، في جزر البحر بجنوب كارولينا. يناقش تاريخ العبودية في الجزر ودور المدرسة في تثقيف الأمريكيين من أصل أفريقي لتعليمهم المهارات اللازمة لتحقيق الإكتفاء الذاتي والمساهمة في المجتمع. ولأن العلم يعتبر أول ثورة لمحاربة الجهل والطبقية والإستعباد، فإن الفيلم يسلط الضوء على ثورتهم العلمية والثقافية على واقع فرض عليهم. وأخيراً، فيلم REVOLUTIONARY؛ هو قصة ناشط شيوعي مسنّ يعود من الأسر لكنه يستأنف مع إبنه الراشد النضال من أجل الشيوعية. أما عن سبب اعتماد هذه التراتبية، فلأن الأول يعتبر من أكثر الأفلام القاسية رغم أنه صامت لكن الصورة كافية لتعبر عن صرخة الشعوب المتظاهرة والمنتفضة، ثمّ بعد ذلك يأتي فيلم أحد سينما الهواة الذي لم يعطى تلك الأهمية وقتئذ لكنه حالياً يعتبر من الأرشيف شبه المفقود وإن تلك المشاهد مرغوبة لدى الناس الحاليين من باب التعرف على الماضي، ويأتي في الدرجة الثانية لأنه ينقل ربما نفس طريقة العذاب الذي عاشه الناس لكي يثوروا على واقعهم، أما الفيلم الثالث فهو أيضاً امتداد للعذاب الذي عاشته الشعوب خلال الحروب العالمية لكن لكي ينقل صورة عن مدى قدرة الإنسان الإستمرار في العيش رغم قساوة الأوضاع وتفشي الأمراض، وأيضاً لينقل حقيقة الثورة على الواقع كيف يمكن أن تطبق، خصوصاً فإن البعض يستسلم من خلال الإعتقاد بعدم قدرتهم على فعل أي شيء، يأتي هذا الفيلم ليقول أن الإنسان جاهز حتى لمقارعة الواقع وإن من لم يستطع أن يغير حال حياته فإن على الأقل يستطيع عدم الإستسلام ويستطيع أن يغير حاله الشخصي والإستمرار بالحياة خطوة بخطوة لأفضل. ثم الفيلم الرابع فهو تحية لمارتن لوثر كينغ رمز الثورة في أفريقيا ولأنه هو أعلن أن الثورة تبدأ من شخص المرء ومن خلال التعلم ومتابعة الدراسة لمحاربة الجهل، فإن هذا الفيلم يؤكد صدق ما تحدث به هذا الإنسان العظيم ليكون عبرة أولى ومثال للآخرين. بعدها الفيلم الخامس عن المدرسة للطلاب الأفارقة وهي مصداق لما أتى في السابق أن الثورة الأهم هي الثورة على الجهل، وأن الفيلم يسرد تاريخ الإستعباد ثم كيف استطاع الأطفال أن يثوروا على الواقع رغم الأوضاع القاسية في جزرهم بأن يتابعوا تعليمهم وبالتالي هم من سيغيروا الأحوال القاسية المحيطة بهم. وأما آخر فيلم فهو قصة رجل يأتي من فكر ثوري، سجن بداعي تغيير قناعاته ومبادئه لكنه رغم ذلك لم يتغير وهنا يطرح فكرة الإيمان بالمبدأ وهو أهم ما يجب أن التمتع به لضمان إستمرارية روح الثورة في الشعوب، لذا وبعد خروجه من السجن يستأنف النضل من أجل الشيوعية لتطبيقها رغم الأوضاع الخطرة المحيطة به، بل إنه أيضاً يدعو إبنه لمشاركته النضال ومتابعة الحركة غير آبه للمخاطر. وإن هذه ردة الفعل هي بحد ذاتها أهم أنواع الثورة.
Films:
1968 (2 min)
La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1945 (25 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1919 (15 min)
Archives françaises du film du CNC
1967 (1 min)
BFI - British film institute
1942 (17 min)
Library of Congress
1917 (30 min)
Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique
Paul Jamhouri - Ali Hamouch - Institut des Études Scénographiques Audiovisuelles et Cinématographiques - USJ
Listening to the scene: Music on Film (73 min)
The power of music, which surpasses simple “joy”, has always been an inherent part of all cultures, arts and political movements: Songs of tribesmen and liturgical chants, as different as they may sound, had always strived to aim at the human soul and pierce it, rendering one enchanted and entranced in this deeply human experience. Music itself is an art that was never stagnant, evolving continuously and repeatedly throughout the ages, with European music going from classical to baroque and experiencing the operatic in-between whilst American music was under constant renewal with folk and jazz and the all-too famous rock’n roll. Brazil revealed to the world the samba and bossa nova, all while Africa was blessing us with an indescribable dynamism through its Afrobeat. Yet music, with all of its regarded splendor and larger-than-life influence that transcended the mere here-and-now, became associated with a different art by the early years of the 20th century: Cinema took over as the biggest medium that made the greatest usage of music. Surely, before 1927, the year sound was first introduced to the motion pictures, orchestras would play during projections. Soon these orchestras magically morphed into sound strips accompanying 35 mm projectors that wowed the audience with the effervescent power that music has over the scenes, becoming a second layer of editing, a melodic application of the Koulechov theory and a thruster of events at times with the musicals that later invaded the silver screen! Music on film is not merely present to embellish or increase the impact of a scene, it is also a bearer of thoughts and visions through sound, a detour from that which takes place onscreen, a semi-palimpsest that rewrites our perception of the visual, becoming at times the equivalent of the film’s acoustic identity. Who of us can hear the word Godfather nowadays without imagining Nino Rota’s magisterially elegiac title theme? Or Kieslowski’s Color trilogy without the carefully sprinkled grandiose pieces by Zbigniew Presner? Sometimes a film’s soundtrack becomes even the life and blood of a film (or three) as The Qatsi trilogy were films in need of Philip Glass’ music to work, while the Lord of The Rings trilogy loses more than half of its epic scope with the absence of Howard Shore’s truly magical score, the latter who once said: “I want to write and feel the drama. Music is essentially an emotional language, so you want to feel something from the relationships and build music based on those feelings.” Nevertheless, as music has become a bearer of images of sorts, a cradle in which filmmakers could hide the imperfections of their films in or highlight their strengths, the art itself was never uniformly used in cinema, with its functions constantly fluctuating and its styles morphing into one that suits the medium of film and nothing else, hence the “film music or score”, a term that emerged following the popularization of sound in film. Even the soundtrack-selling business can sometimes be as profitable as a popular artist’s album release, with notable examples including Bruce Springsteen rushing out of cinema after watching The Good, The Bad & The Ugly to buy the soundtrack by Ennio Morricone. Moreover, music has always served as a tool of political dissidence, with slaves in the United States communicating secretly through blues music and labor chants becoming an integral part of class solidarity movement, turning the chants and tunes into fearsome adversaries of the establishment. In this film program, we will present you not only with films that incorporate music as a part of their DNA, but films that incorporate music in staggeringly different ways in order to relay an experience that serves as an eye – and ear – opener to the function of music in the quintessential visual medium: Be it nationalistic propagandas by the government of Japan, an experimental exploration of rhythmic animation and montage, a display of singing’s raw power in challenging the system, an animated trip through the colorful mind of a composer, a sung epic about the triumphs of ancient kings or even a sincere musical journey into the question of womanhood, this program proves that music is not merely a representation of what takes place onscreen, it is its own morphing art that might grace our screens with its presence... and at times disrupt it. By watching Music on Film, you will be exploring the existing symbiosis between image and sound all while facing different applications of music in cinema, even at times seeing the evolution of music’s role in the construction of a moment, a scene, or an entire film. Watch, listen and question what you know about the function of music and musicians in the film world following this musical trip and the mutual influence that exists between both. Enjoy the listening!
Films:
1899 (1 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1931 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan - Japanese animated film classics
1938 (6 min)
BFI National Archive
1959 (18 min)
National Library of Scotland
1983 (3 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1968 (2 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1960 (10 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1936 (4 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
2005 (6 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
2016 (19 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Giorgio Bassil - Mohamad Tabbouch - Evelyne Hlais - Institut des Études Scénographiques Audiovisuelles et Cinématographiques
Semi-fantômes (86 min)
Que devient le cinéma sans le visuel ? Dans la salle obscure qui regarde et qui est regardé ? La notion du voyeurisme est une notion relativement négligée du processus réceptif. Je vais dans une salle pour voire. Je ne suis pas dans une perspective d’être vue. Je m’éclipse dans le noir. À partir du moment où l’homme regarde, la notion du voyeurisme s’applique. Qui, ce « semi-homme » est-il en train de regarder dans la salle obscure ? Il ne regarde certainement pas seulement le personnage sur l’écran. « Le cinéma est psychique » d’après Epstein. Ce spectateur est « semi-homme » lorsqu’il regarde d’après d’Edgar Morin, grâce au phénomène de « projection-identification ». Épargnons tous les termes déjà évoqués. Notre sélection se résume à une prise de conscience inconsciente du spectateur, confronté à une succession d’images sur lesquelles, sans histoire il est capable de s’identifier, déjà du fait qu’elles se jouent toutes dans des huis-clos, et que leurs actions soient réduites à celles d’un quotidien commun avec des éléments étranges. Le fantôme n’est pas l’autre car l’apparition surnaturelle d’un personnage à l’écran, auquel je m’identifie, fait de moi aussi un semi-fantôme. La caméra est capable de me transformer en semi-fantôme dès lors que je lui prête mon regard. Le cinéma décompose alors la réalité de l’homme, la recompose à l’écran et permet à l’homme lui-même de la reconstituer à la projection. Ce n’est plus la chose qui compte mais la perception de la chose. L’ambiance hitchcockienne sert à cette prise de conscience révélatrice. Elle pousse « l’angoisse gratuite » à fond et procure le « semi-homme » et la « semi-machine de projection » à déceler le mécanisme de voyeurisme. À partir de ce moment précis, tout devient cinéma et le cinéma devient tout. Le processus de projection sur ce, consiste à faire jouer en loupe toute la sélection, en même temps, dans différentes salles l’une à côté de l’autre. Les motifs constamment récurrent notamment du suspense, permettent au spectateur de se déplacer d’un film à l’autre avec une continuité mentale équilibré. Le montage de cette sélection est physiquement programmé alors, par le spectateur lui-même, qui a besoin de passer d’une pièce à l’autre afin de voir le film suivant. Il est inconsciemment conscient du jeu de montage et du « je » voyeur, qui le pousse à vouloir passer à la salle suivante pour finir par être regardé par l’écran, droit dans les yeux. Cette sélection est une expérience complète des capacités du cinéma, de la combinaison de l’effet technique et du psychisme humain, qui seule est capable de permettre à l’homme de creuser en lui-même et de savoir de quoi il est doté. De quelles capacités mais aussi à quoi il se mêle dans la salle de projection et comment il se métamorphose et devient un « semi-fantôme ».
Films:
1973 (5 min)
Centro Cultural La Moneda
1964 (5 min)
National Library of Scotland
1911 (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
2021 (32 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1963 (4 min)
La cinémathèque des pays de savoie et de l ain
1944 (3 min)
Mémoire filmique Pyrénées - Méditerranée
1923 (27 min)
la Cinémathèque française
1926 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional
Sara Lawrence - Indiana University
Lets Face the Music and Dance (60 min)
To dance is to express emotion. Dance has been around for thousands of years. It can be seen as an outlet, a symbol, a passion. As Gene Kelly once said, "You dance love, and you dance joy, and you dance dreams". Dance can be many things, and over the years people have adapted its form to express the human condition of their time. Something however can also be said for the traditions that dance preserves. A time capsule that allows us to glimpse into the past. A cultural heritage that is rich and vibrant in costume, tradition, and history. The folk dance, embodies all of this and is passed on from generation to generation. It is a symbolic dance that ties the joy of its people in their cultural identity and allows spectators an opportunity to glimpse at a tradition seamlessly frozen in time. It is a dance of joy. The films curated in this program all contain folk dances that span a varied mix of countries and cultures. They include the traditional costumes of the people and can all be seen as expressions of joyfulness and pride in a long preserved heritage of cultural identity. Most of the films listed are from European countries pre-World War II. I like to think that, although World War I was a war of atrocities, a lot of Europe's innocence remained intact during this time, and can be seen as an idealistic embodiment through the film footage. Although there are a few from the selection that are included post World War II (Vivante et riante Bretagne 1964, Manigod, village en fête 1955, Festival folklorique international d'Amélie les Bains 1950, and Folk Dancing in Haifa Streets on Independence Day 1950), most can be viewed with this rose tinted lens. Countries included are Romania (Viata la tara 1914), Denmark (Folkedans i Christiansgave 1926), Yugoslavia (Pod Jugoslovenskim nebom, 1934. Selo u okolini Zagreba), Netherlands (De Betuwe bloeit 1935), Spain (Pasqua a Súria 1934), Scotland (Scottish Dances 1915), France (Oloron actualités : Danses espagnoles 1912), and Portugal (A 1ª Festa Vindimária em Lisboa - Outubro de 1936). I hope you enjoy this small glimpse of history told by the people, through dance.
Films:
1914 (3 min)
Arhiva Naţională de Filme – Cinemateca Română
1926 (2 min)
Kvikmyndasafn Íslands
1934 (2 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1955 (2 min)
Jerusalem Cinematheque - Israel Film Archive
1950 (6 min)
Institut Jean Vigo - Cinémathèque euro-régionale
1897-1899 (1 min)
Filmoteca Española
1934 (4 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1935 (3 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1915 (7 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1912 (2 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1955 (4 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1936 (7 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1964 (17 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Ben Parnin - Indiana University
Communication: What is on your Mind (69 min)
Communication is a necessity for humanity. Without a way to communicate we would be unable to share ideas, express our feelings, or pass along knowledge and memories. Since the dawn of humanity, we have created several different mediums for communication, written language, pictures, photography, film, video, telephones, e-mail, and many more. With the development of each new form of communication, rules and etiquettes were quickly created to maintain societal expectations. I have tried to curate some videos that encapsulate and showcase some of the various mediums and etiquettes of communication as well as the struggle people have in sharing what’s on their mind.
Films:
1999 (2 min)
Texas Archive of the Moving Image
1950 (16 min)
Library of Congress
2004 (16 min)
Irish Film Archive
1952 (11 min)
NFSA
1983 (24 min)
Indiana University Moving Image Archive
Jerome Bingham - Indiana University
More than Leisure: A Look at the Bicycle (89 min)
From Vittorio De Sica's 1948 film Bicycle Thieves to Wes Anderson's 2021 film The French Dispatch, the bicycle is a staple of the cinema. A bicycle is more than a alternative to driving a car. This human powered machine is a tool, a exercise device, a sport, a newspaper transporter, and a form of popular culture. The bicycle was pioneered by Baron Karl Friedrich Christian Ludwig Freiherr Drais von Sauerbronn. His first prototype the draisine was a foot powered device with two wooden wheels and no pedals. A slightly later iteration, the Velocipede, was a two wheeled device, this time with pedals. Still without rubber tires, these early bicycle used iron bars around the wooden wheels and were known as 'bone shakers'. Today the modern bicycle has a frame made from a combination of steel, carbon fiber, and aluminum, supporting two wheels with rubber tires (always get the Continental Gatorskins), and handlebars, wrapped up in a complex series of gears, pedals, and cables. The bicycle keeps a film going as it can take the viewer from point A to point B. These four films showcase bicycles as more than a leisure activity. In Bill's case from Bill's Bike, he learned about road safety, hard work, and popularity from owning a bicycle in this 1939 experimental film by William Steuber. The Magic of the Bicycle, an animated film from 1965 presented by Arnold Schwinn & Co. (Yes, that famous bicycle company) digs into the early history and public safety. One film that did not make the selection due to time constrictions is the Imperial War Museums' ASSAULT UNITS PREPARE FOR THE INVASION OF EUROPE (PART 2) [Allocated Title]. This two minute film shows a bicycle as a way to carry messages and payment. Le Tour de L'Ariege and the Little 500 highlight bicycles in the realm of sport. This transforms bicycles into a competition with people compete to test their strength and endurance on said bicycles. In the case of the Little 500, bicycles are now a form of culture as a bicycle race takes the form of a festival of sorts. A bicycle can take you anywhere, you just have to figure out where to start.
Films:
1958 (23 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1965 (25 min)
Library of Congress
1939 (16 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
1971 (25 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Sarah Prause - Indiana University
Blooming: Flowers on Film (33 min)
Flowers first evolved 140 million years ago and have earned the adoration of Earth's creatures ever since. Beyond their undeniable beauty, flowers are versatile, with uses in cooking, decorating, and medicine. We press flowers in books, print them on our clothes, wear them in our hair, and give them as gifts. We grow the kinds we like and uproot those we don’t. We borrow their beauty to enhance our own. Sometimes a flower is just a flower. Sometimes they represent life and death. Love and loss. Joy and pain. Sometimes a single flower can convey more words. In the Victorian era, flowers were exchanged in place of words, becoming a language all their own. Specific blooms carried specific messages or feelings. A yellow lily, for example, indicated happiness and levity, while an orange lily meant hatred. Today, the act of giving flowers still imparts meaning, though the specificity has been largely abandoned. The following 5 films feature various aspects of flowers and use them to indicate various feelings and intentions. Some use them to indicate adoration, others use them to mark a loss of innocence. All but one of the films are silent, which allows the flowers to convey their meaning uninterrupted. As you watch these films, and others, I invite you to “smell the roses” and consider the message of the flowers.
Films:
1909 (1 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1908 (9 min)
Cineteca del Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1961 (14 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1940 (5 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
2010 (4 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Sarah Bull - Indiana University
Fairy Tales and Fantasy: Magic in Silent Film (64 min)
Magic and film go hand-in-hand. The human imagination is, and has always been awash in fairy tales, wives tales, superstitions and ghost stories: Stories about gods and monsters, men and mysticism. Magic could explain what science could not, and, even with the practical explanations of lab-created plastics and negative prints-turned-positive, I still find film to be a magical creation, a miracle of engineering and light, a mechanical means of immortalizing scenes which would otherwise exist once and never again. In the early days of film, when the medium was restricted by heavy, difficult-to-move equipment, as well as colorless and soundless film stock, people nonetheless experimented and worked with the material, creating scenes of magic in moving images. Though early cinematographers did not have access to the digital tools we use today to put magic on the silver screen, they nonetheless ingeniously worked with the physical medium of film to create scenes which defied the norms of everyday life. Hand-painted film, creative costume designs, and clever editing all work in tandem to make stories like Jack and the Beanstalk come to life. Another particularly creative work on this list is The Magic Glass (1914), in which an experiment creates a magnifying glass that can see through walls. Dysfunction ensues as the magic glass allows the family of characters to supernaturally bear witness to each other's improper behaviors. An important component of silent film is shown here as well: The expressiveness of the actors carries the plot along despite the lack of audible speech, a detail which works with the believable “magic” of the film to prove that, though the medium of film was comparatively restricted in the first quarter of the 20th century, those restrictions would be perhaps better understood as film pioneers understood them, simply a component of the medium. As may be apparent at this point, this program expands the idea of magic to encompass all aspects of the supernatural, fantastical, and incredible. This is seen from the oldest of the films featured in this program, The Magician (1900), which features a magician performing tricks for a minute while on a theatrical stage, to the newest, The Magic Wand (1936), a film about children who acquire a magic wand which transforms them into fairy tale creatures and gives them power over their back garden. This film is additionally of interest due to its age. As a 1936 film, sound would have been available, were it created by a major studio. As it is, The Magic Wand is a creative home movie starring the director’s own children, silent due to its provenance rather than as a rule of the medium. Where humans can tell stories, they will tell stories of magic. The modernly perceived limitations of silent film, in several ways, only increase the sense of wonder one gets from viewing magic on early film. While we are used to viewing computer-generated spectacles of magic, the films in this program create true magic, using clever camera and film tricks to create worlds of fantasy.
Films:
1900 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1906 (13 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1912 (14 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1914 (12 min)
British Film Institute
1923 (11 min)
The Museum of Modern Art
1936 (13 min)
National Library of Scotland
Mary Kate McConahay - Indiana University
Marching Madness (39 min)
Parades are a tradition that has a rich history and is present throughout many if not most cultures. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, the earliest record of parades was in prehistoric times from cave paintings. Those paintings showed a group of triumphant hunters carrying the fruits of their labor, the animals that they successfully killed. As society and culture have evolved so too have parades. They have expanded past victorious hunts to victorious victories, to dedications and festivals, and religious processions. They induce many different feelings and atmospheres from celebratory such as commemorating a city’s anniversary or a more somber setting like a funeral procession. They can invoke patriotic passion with military parades or pride when a particular sports team competes. Parades are so prevalent and have the ability to inspire different emotions and create different atmospheres because they have one essential quality, community. To have a parade is to have a community. Parades give the opportunity to build, establish, and celebrate the community. They can do this by presenting a shared culture. This can be done using traditional dress/costume, make up, traditional jobs/tools and transportation such as horses. Parades can also build community by celebrating their city along with the people. They do this by commemorating a day a port was established or the long history of a particular city. The parade is a way to educate those new to the city about their now shared history and a visual representation for children and reinforcement for adults. These values are best represented by various archival films captured throughout the years such as “PERSONAL RECORD. EDGECOMBE, COURTNEY. PARADE”, “Japanese Festival”, “Deulig-Woche 1926 (seit 1926). Parades are fluid and can be used beyond celebrating history. They are also used to create support, acknowledge loss, and propaganda. A sports parade is a perfect example of how showcasing the talents of the athletes, will drum up support from the crowd. This accomplishes two goals; first, the athletes will recognize that their talent won't be wasted and left unseen, second, the community is now aware of the of their athletes’ talents and will feel that they have a stake in their ability. Thus, the community will root for the team/program such as in “Traditional football match, Chula-Thammasat University”. A funeral procession is also an example of how parades can be used beyond celebration. They can be somber affairs. These processions could be used to inform the community that a member has died, and that community will now have to recognize the loss. This can be seen in "ARMANDINHO'S FUNERAL". A parade can also be used for propaganda purposes, to showcase military strength and fortitude. This show of power can galvanize the population and make them feel even more patriotic while also intimidating its critics, take “The Victory Parade" for instance. These films perfectly encapsulate how parades transcends borders and cultures. They are used for a variety of reasons from celebration and remembrance to inauguration and prowess. They can be playful, subdued, rigid and controlled, but one thing they all have in common is there wouldn't be a parade without a corresponding community. In all films shown, the community is present, they are either active participants or spectators. Thus, where there is a community, there is a parade.
Films:
1955 (2 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1926 (17 min)
Filmothek
1952 (5 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1946 (4 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1919 (6 min)
The CNC French Film Archive Collections in the EFG1914 Project
Heidi Yarger - Indiana University
Bee Here Now (62 min)
I do not know how people end up becoming beekeepers. Maybe it is a craft passed down through their family, a point of pride in their ancestral lineage taught across generations. Maybe it is something learned through a how-to book or a favorite blog. Or maybe they happen upon beekeeping by working in their community garden or taking an introductory class on a whim. For me, it happened after watching the 2010 documentary, Queen of the Sun. I was 16 years old and enthralled by the calmness of the people on the screen and by the sense of bliss they seemed to feel from their experiences working with honeybees. I was mesmerized particularly by a man who went into the apiary without any protective gear on and who brushed his thick mustache across the bees as they moved along a frame of comb. He looked up and smiled at the camera, commenting that the bees liked it, then somewhat prophetically he said that it was the bees who chose the beekeeper, not the other way around. Whatever this strange and wonderful practice was, I wanted to be a part of it. I wanted to be chosen. When my first beekeeping mentor handed me a frame from a beehive, covered in tens of busy little insects moving back and forth millimeters away from my bare hands, I was afraid. Slowly though, I became more comfortable as my mentor taught me how to understand the mood of a beehive using my senses. We wore face coverings but left our hands bare so that we could feel the bees against our skin and make sure we didn’t accidentally hurt or crush any of them (note how many beekeepers in this series wear no protective gear at all). The sounds and smells were important, too. There was a gentle hum when the bees were calm, and an audible uptick in volume and tone when they were starting to get angry. The tense music at the end of Voyage en Bretagne (1948) is a bit misleading because honeybees are remarkably calm when they are in a swarm state, as you’ll see in Honey Country (1950). Beekeeping is a way to connect oneself with something wild and unpredictable and vibrant. The name “beekeeper” has always felt like a misnomer because there is no way to actually “keep” the bees. They can leave whenever they want. When you have a hive of your own, it is your job to interact with the bees, to get to know them, to be a good host, and to keep them happy—I feel this gentle stewardship, especially in Odds & ends around the farm (1945) and hope you do too. There is something special about the relationship between the bees and the beekeeper, no doubt. But I don’t buy that it is something that chooses us. I think all of us have the capacity to slow down, connect to our environment, and become comfortable in situations that can turn on us at any moment. As you watch this short collection of films about bees, beekeeping, and the environments they are a part of, my hope is to position films that communicate the wild exuberance of the beehive (Voyage en Bretagne (1948), Odds & Ends Around the Farm (1945)) against those that position beekeeping through a scientific and/or educational lens (L’Apiculture (1913), Bee-Keeping on the Move (1947), Honey Country (1950)), so that you may observe the tension between the effort to mechanize and tame a creature that is, in so many wonderful ways, untamable. As beekeeping is a practice of presence, I also hope you find it interesting to view this art across different periods in time and within different areas of the world. Though you can’t feel them yourself, perhaps you can imagine the smells and sounds present in the apiaries while you watch as well. Enjoy!
Films:
1913 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1947 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1948 (13 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1950 (16 min)
BFI National Archive
1945 (19 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
Josh K - Indiana University
Grounds for Examination: Coffee in Film and Life (70 min)
“Coffee for breakfast, coffee at mid-morning break, coffee after lunch, and coffee to round off the day” (“Black or White - Shieldhall Coffee Essence,” 14 - 21 sec.). Coffee is a modern staple the world over, but is taken for granted as a part of everyday life. What follows is an examination of coffee and its impact on the world through film. Just how popular is coffee? A staple of cafés for over a century, coffee has become the de facto beverage for breakfast. Even back in 1966, as shown in the advertisement ‘Census 66 TV Ad 5’, coffee was the drink of choice for breakfast. After all, how else would one power through government census documentation! Another Australian film, this time the educational ‘Behind the Menu’ portrays not just the use of coffee in morning meals, but also the staple in the different solidity-variants of breakfast put together for patients at the hospital. While solidity was optional, coffee was essential for hospital diets. These films help to demonstrate the daily use of coffee. Not just a fad in Australia, the production and use of coffee has been worldwide for many decades. Two films highlight the production phases of coffee and coffee products. The first, ‘South American medley --Brazil’ discusses the harvesting and shipping of coffee from one of the major world producers, Brazil. The other, ‘BLACK OR WHITE - SHIELDHALL COFFEE ESSENCE,’ preserved by the National Library of Scotland, shows the factory production line of a coffee beverage. Taken together, both films imply the world's involvement in creating coffee for consumers. Of course the coffee business did not just consist of production, but a full range of advertisements to market brands and inventions for the perfect cup of jitter juice. To keep pace with the speed and convenience demanded by modern society, coffee maker technology greatly improved. Coffee makers were required to quickly produce high volumes of the caffeinated nectar, like the short clip preserved by the Israel Film Archive ‘Advertisement for the KLS Espresso Machine’ explains. Marketing coffee took drastically different forms to appeal to strategic demographics. Compare the sophisticated and fancy feel of the ‘Yuban Coffee ‘Dining’ ad at the IUMIA to the counterculture themes found in the BFI’s preserved ad ‘Good Strong Coffee.’ Surprisingly, these two advertisements were made only three years apart. These ads also help highlight the world's thirst for coffee products, from Israel, to the United States, to even Great Britain. With the large scale production, wide marketing of industry innovations, and the common usage of coffee, it begs the question of how far is one willing to go to appease their coffee addiction? The limit, while unknown, must be further than war times, as archival footage demonstrates the commitment western nations had to coffee during World War II. The Imperial War Museums provides training footage of Greek special forces in ‘THE GREEK SACRED COMPANY,’ who still managed to brew a pot of java between maneuvering practices in the Tunisian desert. When the United States entered the war, their soldiers came well supplied with coffee thanks in part to Brazil, who donated tens of thousands of sacks of Victory Brand coffee as demonstrated in the short clip ‘Atualidades Movietone as Nacoes Unidas -- outtakes’. Even the lack of available coffee supplies did not stop civilians from enjoying a pot, as they turned to coffee-like alternatives. The Swedish commercial for Skandia coffee replacement comedically shows this in ‘Skandia kaffeersättning – Kaffehuset Skandia Sthlm’. The lengths gone to in order to continue enjoying coffee appears limitless. Two packets of sugar? No sugar? Double-shot? Decaf? With milk? Extra creamer? Just black? Soy? Latte? Cappuccino? Coffee comes in virtually endless combinations based on personal preference. These decisions are not just menu options though. A common social understanding exists that coffee preferences imply deeper personality traits of the drinker. It’s not just a cup of joe to enjoy, but a reflection of Joe as a person. For instance, black coffee with no sugar for the stern boss that is quick to criticize, or decaf with extra cream and sugar for the sensitive soul with anxiety. This connection between coffee and personality traits is presented in the short film ‘Day One,’ directed by Lisa Mulcahy and available from the IFI Irish Film Archive. Take note of Jody’s debate when ordering coffee for her new boss (at about 4 minutes and 30 seconds), and the comedic anxiety that ensues. Finally, coffee has a role in popular culture. Long before the famous coffee shop in the TV series Friends, coffee was used in entertainment; this early comedic clip ‘Marchand de nougat’ from a work created in 1902 showcases what can go wrong for a coffee server when a child plays a prank. Coffee also takes center stage in the entertainment piece through a portion of the Finnish news reel ‘Finlandia-katsaus 251’. The two minute and 24 second mark displays a 1954 coffee competition, in which the winner won their weight in coffee. Even 70 years later, avid coffee connoisseurs are envious of those coffee grinding skills! Surveying film collections for coffee inclusion reveals significant connections between humans, society, and coffee. Enjoying a cup of coffee has created large economic contributions in collecting and processing the noble coffee bean. Clever inventions and marketing keeps coffee relevant and exciting to society, while strengthening the addiction to the beverage; creating a need so strong it perseveres through war and scarcity. The abundant choices in coffee preference also reveal supposed deeper characteristics about us as individuals. Cups of java have even factored into the long history of the entertainment industry. With all this in mind, we’ll have to see what is brewing next for coffee on film.
Films:
1966 (1 min)
NFSA Films
1950 (13 min)
ACMI
1941 (11 min)
Library of Congress
1959 (6 min)
National Library of Scotland
1960 (1 min)
Jerusalem Cinematheque - Israel Film Archive
1965 (1 min)
IUMIA
1968 (2 min)
BFI National Archive
1943 (6 min)
Imperial War Museums
1943 (1 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1941 (2 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
2000 (17 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1902 (1 min)
Filmoteca Española - Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte
1954 (8 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
Justin C Harrison - Indiana University
Ferroequinology (79 min)
Since the creation of the first steam locomotive in 1804, the iron horse has captivated much of the world. Tracks stretch from coast to coast, conquering continents and connecting people over vast distances, the railway was a revolution in transportation. The railway has held a significant place not only in the history of the modern world but also in the history of cinema. From the moment the Lumière brothers revealed, The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station, people have been captivated by the locomotive and the film opportunities it presents. Early pictures offered ‘phantom rides’ with views from the front of the locomotive, such as “View from an Engine Front - Barnstaple (1898)” and “Elevated railroad, New York” (1903). To amateur footage of cross country journeys, such as “Glimpses of the Easter Rambler (1963)”, trains have offered an opportunity to film landscapes and stunning vistas. The process of filming and photographing trains and railways has inspired communities of railfans, humorously known as ‘ferroequinologists’ for their study of the iron horse, to document the railways of the world in both the mediums of photograph and film. The films curated for this screening show a wealth of footage from these ferroequinologists from across the past century and beyond. From railway openings (Fra åpningen av Bergensbanen i 1909) to documenting the luxurious experience of the passenger train (The passenger Train, 1940). These films offer a glimpse into the world of the ferroequinologist and the wonderful moments and scenes they have captured, both on and of the train.
Films:
1903 (2 min)
Library of Congress
1940 (11 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1952 (23 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1963-1964 (13 min)
National Library of Scotland
Lili Magdolna Kátai - Central European University
Grief on Film (75 min)
Grief, a feeling of loss is ever-present in our lives. From the moment of birth, we are exposed to the world. Growing up, we slowly start to lose the childly idyll and as we get to know the world better, we are faced with more and more grievances. The forms of processing grief, however, vary widely. From mass funerals to individual, desperate and lonely grief, to the collective grief COVID-19 gave rise to, a challenge we are all faced with at the moment, grief can take many forms. Although it varies from person to person, from culture to culture, what is common to all is that grief is the processing of loss, no matter what this loss is and how it came to be. The documentary film ‘Karriguel an Ankou’ and the ‘Funeral of Don Rua’ present us with mass funerals that are impersonal in the sense that grief represents itself not in the form of the emotions of the grieving individual but rather in collective respect for the person who passed away. The movie ‘Karriguel an Ankou’ with shots from the landscape of Bretagne depicts perfectly how constants, such as the movement of the sea, the crashing of waves as well as the Sun reflecting on the sea stand in contradiction but also in an inseparable bond with the transience of life, presented by the person who passed away. This contradiction is also depicted by Marshall Curry’s movie ‘The Neighbors’ Window’. The viewer is presented with a couple tired of engaging with family duties, and their frustration further increased by spying on a madly-in-love couple living across the street. Although the couple’s life seems to be harmonious, it turns out that their life is far from perfect and is shadowed by death. Suddenly, in the face of death and grief, life becomes precious. Todd Karehana’s movie, the ‘Night ride’ presents the viewer with a different approach to grief. The 66 years old mom starts feeding cats in front of their old house, where she lived with her sons, including the one who passed away. As her other son takes her to the house, he aims to find out what brings her mom to their old home every single day, and what stands behind her addiction of feeding stray cats. It turns out, that feeding the stray cats substitutes the constant in her life that was overturned by the death of her son and also gives her an excuse to see the house where she raised her kids and had a happy, idyllic life. The story emphasizes how people cannot be forced to move on, and how grief is an individual process and for this reason, everyone has to find their pace of coping with it. Pinczés Dávid’s short film, ‘Infinity by Two’ also presents us with how habits can help to cope with grief. The two old men know each other so well, that they do not even have to speak to understand each other. However, when death comes up, their conversation becomes absurd. As we find out that they are both blind and deaf, we realize that their conversations happened only in their heads, that their conversation does not require physical presence, that their conversation is a mere memory. Grief represents itself in the memory of their habits. Although the movie is about the loneliness of death, it depicts how we can still find a way to those who passed away. The ‘Life of Rosary Castro-Olega’ represents how our everyday lives are closely connected with the death of the victims of the pandemic. The short documentary tells us how death became ‘normalized’ in the sense that it constitutes an essential part of the new system which Covid-19 gave rise to. This movie presents the story of a victim of the pandemic, making us realize the many stories and precious lives that we lost in the past pandemic years.
Films:
1960 (8 min)
Cinémathèque Bretagne
1910 (16 min)
Cineteca MNC
2019 (20 min)
Marshall Curry
2021 (10 min)
Short of the Week
2020 (15 min)
Pinczés Dávid
2020 (6 min)
New York Times
Sophia Marton - Central European University
The Power of Hands (57 min)
Hands have always been an interesting part of the human body. Many times, throughout history, hands have been associated with creation. Whether it is our own creation through the idea of God making man, or what we can create ourselves. All these films listed are stop motion, a tasking, and long process all done by hand. Three of these films are Czech while one is French though, with none to very little audio besides music. All these films focus very intently on hands and the things they create, whether in the form of constant close-ups to a hand being a central character. Beginning with the first film, The Sand Castle (1977), we observe how a single figure alone in the desert creates many unique creatures from the sand who interact with their environment and the other creatures that appear beside them. Continuing with Darkness/Light/Darkness (1989), we watch as a simple pair of hands trapped in a room interact with other individual parts of the human body before creating a whole man, piece by piece. The next film, The Hand (1965), delves a little deeper into the meaning behind one's creation and purpose. Our main character, a puppet who works in ceramics, meets a gloved hand wishing for a bust of itself. The puppet attempts to lose the hand at every turn but, we see how the hand easily takes over the situation, as well as the puppet himself. Our final film on this list, Food (1992), is the only film that combines some live-action with the clay stop motion. Food is separated into three distinctly different parts. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. We see many closeups of the hands and faces of our characters and how they interact with their meals or unexpected twists that turned into meals. We see situations where hands create food out of inedible things and watch the strangely surreal interpretation of eating. Though these films may confuse and seem bizarre, their interpretations of a basic concept are astounding to watch.
Films:
1977 (14 min)
National Film Board of Canada
1989 (8 min)
Ceskoslovenský Filmexport
1965 (18 min)
Krátký Film Praha
1992 (17 min)
Zeitgeist Films
Liron Amir - Tel Aviv University
colonialism, (38 min)
Colonialism, imperialism and depression of other nationalities are part of history and film history. Oppression of nations and cultures took place all around the world, and still do to this very day in various parts under multiple names. In some parts of the world the destruction of culture is talked about, also via film. the first film is the eye of the coloniser, the second film shows rallies against British coloniser in Palestine The third shows liberation from coloniser The fourth shows how to decolonise culture and language.
Films:
1947 (8 min)
iwm imperial war museum
1949 (4 min)
The Irish Independence Film Collection - The Early Irish Free State
1975 (25 min)
NFSA Films Film Australia Collection.
Nicole Feinholz Tobias - Tel Aviv University
Alternate Realities (52 min)
Our world is filled with different points of view, opinions and experiences, and sometimes is hard to get out of the box, and see beyond what we are used to. In my opinion, Science Fiction and Fantasy films present us with an incredibly powerful opportunity to learn, to open our eyes and minds to different ways of seeing the world and to experience reality in ways that challenge us. This genres helps us wonder, imagine, and dare to create beyond the limits of our daily reality, and this is, I think, is almost like magic. In our challenging and ever-changing reality, this is a quality that cannot be overlooked and should be appreciated, even though in the cinematic universe, this genre tends to receive less validation and appreciation. For this, I have created a program full of Science Fiction and Fantasy films from over the world, that at the very least, will show us new worlds and open our horizons. The films in the program may completely belong to the genres, or have certain elements of them, mixing reality with the unusual, creating an even more intriguing effect.
Films:
1950 (11 min)
https://www.cinematheque.fr/henri/
1942 (12 min)
Cineteca National Mexicana
1929 (17 min)
Cinemateca española
1897 (1 min)
Ministerio de cultura y deporte español
1976 (4 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1935 (7 min)
Eye Film Player
Magnus Knoll - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
Gold of the Youth (78 min)
Throughout the 20th century, kids and teens have been prime targets of political propagandists and advertisers, who downplayed their maturity and, at best, treated them as mere brainless zombies. But youth movements, from the rebels with(out) causes of the 1950s, the political demonstrators of the 60s and 70s to the environmental activists of our most current times, testify to their individual consciousness, which has and continues to be threatened by the state, industry as well as by the children's and youths' own parents. This program compiles 15 selected short films and excerpts - including newsreels, trailers, propaganda pieces, advertisements and essay films - that depict what it meant to be young in the 20th century. The 16 second clip "Side Lines on Sinn Féin" from 1920 portrays the punishment of a young girl just for talking to the enemy and comes especially recommended by the curator. The short Danish propaganda piece "Ungdom I arbedje" (Youth at Work) from 1941 depicts unemployed youths detained in working camps and used as forced labour in an effort to keep them off the streets. A 1933 newsreel from New Zealand, meanwhile, depicts boys planting trees for their government. What seems like fun and games on the surface is simmering underneath. The same goes for the 1965 Australian short "Trespass on Summerland" (1965). Examples of film reports from times of social upheaval include the 1970 documentary short "Gay and Proud", featuring many young Americans at the first Christopher Street Day Parade in New York City. Finally, two lyrical essay films by young amateurs that portray a sense of disenchantment with the world - "Pixillation" (1976) and "New York 1981" (1981) - serve here as allegories for the many dreams of the protesters from those days that have failed to materialise in the interim. The films have been chosen for the ability of the images to speak for themselves, with or without a full understanding of historical context that lies beneath each of their surfaces on the part of the viewer. The selected films are presented here in chronological order, but viewers should feel free to explore them in whatever order they like.
Films:
1920 (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1933 (2 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1933 (7 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1941 (7 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1940s (2 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema - Fondazione Maria Adriana Prolo
1960 (8 min)
Filmoteca Española
Unknown (3 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1965 (10 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1967 (2 min)
Filmarchiv Austria
1969 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1970 (12 min)
Library of Congress
1976 (4 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1981 (12 min)
Museum of Modern Art
1989/2019 (5 min)
DEFA Stiftung / Bundesarchiv
1995/2020 (2 min)
BFI National Archive
Ugur Yildirim - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
Amusement (76 min)
Film archives are brim full of documentaries, newsreels and amateur footage which depict people around the world living, singing, dancing or working together. The need to maintain social distancing meant that almost every crowded event worldwide was canceled in 2020. Looking back on our present from the future, one will be confronted with an archival "gap": Due to the cancelling of shows, carnival, sport events, music festivals, exhibitions, etc., no records of these events are being produced that would otherwise have landed in the archives. Instead, all you will find are sports games without an audience or demonstrations against Trump, Lukashenko or other controversial political figures. This programme of 10 films from the last 100 years depict life before the Covid-19 pandemic, from Sydney to Reykjavík, Santander to Tel Aviv. Two of the films date from 1917 and 1920 respectively; a time when tens of millions of human beings throughout the world succumbed to the "Spanish Flu".
Films:
1955 (13 min)
Filmoteca de la UNAM
1923 (1 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1968 (11 min)
Filmoteca Española
c. 1920 (3 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1966 (21 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1932 (1 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1917 (2 min)
Musée Albert-Kahn
1950 (18 min)
Kvikmyndasafn Íslands
1964 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1950 (5 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
Elisabeth Zill - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
Girls (and Boys) on Film (89 min)
This programme includes selected examples of films on the subject of fashion - its creation and presentation. Due to their documentary character, the films for the most part depict prevailing fashions pertaining to a specific time and place, and thus together paint a colourful picture of an industry in motion. The range of subjects include photo sessions, fashion shows and catwalk events from different countries and epochs. The selection also includes advertisements, remixes as well as both short and longer films about the development and use of technology in the fashion world. The running order does not follow a strict chronology but is deliberately erratic on both temporal and spatial levels in an attempt to highlight specific details and offer different insights. Finally, it should be noted that the contributions present vivid images from a time before ours and, as a result, can convey values that may nowadays be viewed as problematic. The blatant sexualization of the (mostly) female models had and still has a certain status within the fashion industry. Any content perceived as problematic should always be considered within the appropriate historical context. It is not the aim of this programme to glorify the stereotypes and sexualized imagery depicted in the films but to use the audiovisual documents to portray an ever-evolving and dynamic industry over time.
Films:
1940/50s (4 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1969 (15 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1967 (5 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1965 (2 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1939 (19 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1938 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1920s? (2 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1962 (10 min)
BFI National Archive
1940s-1970s (2 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1968 (16 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1948 (3 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1931 (1 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1962 (8 min)
Cinémathèque française
1973 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Madeleine Mendell - Moving Image Archiving and Preservation, New York University
Mushroom of My Eye (60 min)
Finding a mushroom can be serendipitous; finding an edible shroom all the more so. Mushroom foraging in the wild requires skill, yes, but also a symbiosis with an ecosystem that resists agricultural control. Mushroom foraging evokes a special knowledge. Per Anna Tsing, the act of mushroom foraging is haunted by the commons. Foraging’s governmental (and technoscientific) regulation reveals how mushrooms can trouble systems of public and private. An elated woman picks a mushroom in the wild; a doctor warns wild mushrooms can kill; agricultural science lays claim to the cultivation and harvest of mushrooms. These five films visualize how mushrooms inspire joy, provoke fear, and therefore require control.
Films:
1920 (11 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1951 (24 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1951 (14 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée
1978 (7 min)
National Library of Scotland
1951 (4 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Seraphim Arlievsky - New York University
Escape from the Kingdom of Shadows: Color in Silent Film (78 min)
In 1896, following a presentation of the Lumiere cinematograph, the Russian writer Maxim Gorky described the moving images he saw as a “Kingdom of Shadows,” representing “not life but its shadow,” a world of “ashen grey” that “invade(s) your mind and your consciousness begins to wane and grow dim…” Theorists as varied as Eisenstein, Bazin and Metz agreed that the basic material of the cinema was an impression of reality, the point of discussion centered on how the material is to be treated. But it was a grey shadow of reality, as Gorky noted, its mystique stemming from the uncanny valley effect of this filtered mirror. Film captured the rays of light at a particular moment in time, and so reconstructed an impression of a specific moment. The art of the cinema constitutes an effort to expand and construct a sequence from these moments, the raw material being transformed into a meaningful work. With montage and other effects, the uncanny valley can be filled. Gorky’s “Kingdom of Shadows” is separated from reality by a plurality of factors, but chief among them are the two-dimensionality of the cinema (the fact that if one turns away for a moment the illusory nature of the film image becomes obvious), the lack of sound, and the lack of color. Since the technology for virtual reality was too far in the future, the silent era saw numerous attempts to incorporate sound and color into film. While much has been said about the use of music and sound effects in silent film, the use of color in this period is not as prevalent in our cultural memory. Sound appears to have been the most important of the three aforementioned aspects, as, when synchronized, it closely ties the image to a soundscape and a specific reality, even without color or a third dimension. However, color can be played with if the image is not tied to an audial reality. Indeed, color in silent film often exacerbates the uncanny valley, and creates a more mysterious, esoteric cinema. Without a voice, the screen images gain a surreal, ghostly feeling. After all, color is completely subjective, depending entirely on lighting, but sound is more easily measured. Lack of sound gives film a surreal, ethereal quality. Color in this context creates a unique aesthetic that is not often seen. This program presents a number of silent films which represent various methods of incorporating color into film and display an uncanny, mystical effect stemming from silent color films. Development of methods for creating color film, from hand-painting individual frames to the more modern dye system later adopted, can be traced through these short films, as well as color’s thematic engagement; elevating the magical elements of a fantasy, heightening the documentation of important locales, and amplifying a call to war. La fee carabosse (1906), a typically creative short from the French magician Georges Melies, exhibits one of the earliest attempts at film colorization. Each frame was painstakingly hand-painted by workers in Melies’s studio, the bright colors augmenting the fantastical elements on screen. Melies was not concerned with color as a property of reality, but as a way of extending the theatricality of his work, which features a witch casting spells, fairy-tale monsters and ghosts amongst other such elements. Aesthetically, the sets and backdrops look artificial, and are typical of theatrical productions. Colorization in this case comes not from manipulation of the photograph, but from the medium of paint, being more in tune with the theatricality and intentional artificiality of the film. Melies’s films are grounded in the traditions of fine arts (especially as incorporated into theatrical arts), and this dictates how he employs color. Der Heimat Schutzengraben (1916) would not be considered to be a color film in the usual sense, but color plays an important role. This German propaganda film, dating to the First World War, urges its audience to buy war bonds. Exemplified here is a standard utilization of color in the silent era; that is, the tinting method. Film reels would be stained, tinting the image a particular color. Films would often switch from black/white to sepia, green, white, blue or yellow. At times, a director would intentionally tint certain segments a certain tone (Abel Gance’s Napoleon, for instance, contains a finale which, as originally conceived, would have three projectors running against three screens, each projector loaded with film of a different tint, so that the triptych seen by the audience would resemble the French flag in its colors). But many films have not been consistent in their tinting across prints. Nevertheless, it was the main way in which color was used throughout much of the silent era, and this short piece represents the typical ways in which color shifts were experienced in film of the time. [Sujets Suissess Pathe-Revue. Suisse-Berne-Fribourg.] (1920) is an authorless nonfiction vignette depicting “Swiss Themes,” showing historical and tourist sites of Switzerland. The colorization process used here marked an advance from previous methods, employing stencils to tint certain parts of the screen specific colors. Allowing for colors that corresponded more closely to reality as we perceive it, this specificity of color was a shift that pulled film out of its shadowy world, with the possibility that it could reflect reality even more closely. Etude de la lumiere (1923) is an experimental film by Maurice Audibert, an early example of film using a trichrome method for color. According to the Cinematheque Francais, its current parent, it used a method that captured three images through three primary color filters, which were then conflated to create a color image. Audibert was an automobile manufacturer, but became interested in the potential of color film. Ultimately, a tri-color system using dyes was adopted as the standard, but the filter method used in this film was important in that it marked a shift from hand-painting and tinting to capturing the natural colors on the celluloid itself. Etude is short and non-narrative, acting as a vehicle for showing off the new technology. The colors are darker and less defined as the standard colorization process of later years, capturing the colors of the most important shapes in the frame, but shrouding the rest in darkness. Father and Kid NYC (c. 1940s), the final entry in this program, is an example of the color film that is familiar to us. While it shows the finale of the progression traced here, it is also unique as a silent film. Home movies were silent for many years after sound became a major component of professional motion pictures. Father and Kid shows the aesthetic of silent color film continuing years after the silent era is generally thought to end. Indeed, any evaluation placing the end of silent film in the late 1930s ignores decades of amateur home footage. The arrival of home movies was a revival of the aesthetic of early silent film, in which the ghostly nature of the shadowy reflection gave mundane, everyday subjects a captivating, mysterious quality. As we watch family life in 1940s New York City, this banal subject becomes surreal and ethereal. Their lack of a voice makes them curious, and provides a tinted window into a world long gone.
Films:
1906 (13 min)
Cinematek Royale de Belgique
1916 (8 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1920 (14 min)
CINÉMATHÈQUE SUISSE
1923 (27 min)
Cinémathèque française
c. 1940s (16 min)
Museum of Modern Art (NYC)
Roberto Carlos Ortiz - Independent Scholar
Al Cinema Transnacional (35 min)
Brief archival exploration intersecting cinema, sexuality and transnational journeys, which are fundamental to the histories of national cinemas. / Breve exploración archivística intersectando cine, sexualidad y jornadas transnacionales, que son fundamentales para las historias de las cinematografías nacionales.
Films:
1934 (4 min)
Moving Image Research Collections
1917 (2 min)
Musée Albert-Kahn
1921 (4 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1931 (9 min)
Cineteca Nacional de México
1932 (5 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1953 (2 min)
Hungarian National Film Archive
1962 (2 min)
Museo del Cine
1947 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1924c (1 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1934 (3 min)
Library of Congress
Klavier Wang - Moving Image Archiving and Preservation, New York University
Food for Life – The private face and the public face of food (86 min)
Food is one of the most intimate friends to human beings. It is the daily bread that feeds us, and our stomachs and souls are therefore gratified. Food connects atomic individuals; and food bonds singularities into entities. Food is one of the most significant weapons to a society. Due to its intimacy with every social aspect, food, hence, can carry profound messages from the nation to the people. Everyday choice of food and decision making on the usage of food matters profoundly. Food and drink touch all aspects of human life and influence human society as a whole – politically, economically, socially and culturally. Our understanding of food, from cooking methods, cultural implication, to scientific facts about a wide range of foods, has existed and ceaselessly advanced since the earliest day human beings were on the earth planet. Through moving image records from archives around the world, we take a kaleidoscopic glance at the multi-dimension of food: how food has played different roles in our private and public lives?
Films:
1931 (5 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1949 (3 min)
BFI
1929 (2 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1928 (6 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1923 (3 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1916 (1 min)
BFI
1920 (3 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1920 (4 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
2007 (5 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1919 (3 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1920 (4 min)
University of Southern Carolina Digital Collection-Fox Movietone News Collection
1934 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1933 (7 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1951 (4 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1941 (6 min)
BFI
1944 (9 min)
Academy Film Archive
1917 (5 min)
George Eastman Museum
Barbara Nováková - University of Amsterdam
Sites of Memory: monuments (86 min)
History is a reconstruction and interpretation of past events and it preserves fluid memory in various forms what French historian Pierre Nora calls sites of memory (les lieux de mémoire). Sites of memory are places, concepts or objects, material or non-material, whose purpose is to represent the past of a certain collective. "The lieux are mixed, hybrid, mutant, bound intimately with life and death, with time and eternity; enveloped in a Mobius strip of the collective and the individual, the sacred and the profane, the immutable and the mobile." (Between Memory and History: Les Lieux de Mémoire, p.19) For the purpose of this game, I have chosen one particular site of memory - monuments. In my selection below are included films depicting monuments that have been erected in various parts of the world throughout the 20th and the 21st century. The list comprises of documentary films about monuments honoring important historical events (The Battle of Mohács, WW I), groups of people (mothers), individuals considered to be national heroes (soldiers who fought in WW I, Stalin and writers) as well as monuments that serve to celebrate religious ceremonies (the ninth day of Novena in Nijmegen). On the occasion of a monument being unveiled, processions and speeches by politicians and religious leaders are held. This public act "performed" by these representatives involves various kinds of "props": wreaths and flowers are laid and national symbols can be seen on flags, ribbons and medals. Memory plays an important role in the formation of the identity of individuals as well as nations. Political and religious leaders select among memories of past events the ones that fit their ideological frameworks and create a coherent narrative - history. Understanding how memory, individual and collective, works and how our leaders can manipulate it, is the first step toward understanding where we have come from (our history) and who we are (our identity). Films, themselves sites of memory, serve to remind us of our past.
Films:
1926 (5 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1925 (2 min)
Irish Film Institute
1945 (4 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1924 (19 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1949 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1948 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1953 (24 min)
Arkivi Qendror Shtetëror i Filmit / Central State's Film Archive of Albania
1966 (4 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
2001 (2 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Kanako Nakanishi - Kawasaki City Museum
Visual rhyming (64 min)
Meredith Monk explained her early performance work “16 Millimeter Earrings” which was presented in 1966 as “visual rhyming”. It refers the repetitive movements in her visual and material world of performances which creates a type of poetry with colors, sounds, and textures. Inspired by this term, the program explores the clues of repetitive movement in the films which resonate with life.
Films:
1889-1904 (28 min)
Cinémathèque française
1926 (4 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1955 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1979 (24 min)
Yale Film Archive
HSIEH I-Hsuan - Taipei Film Festival
Metamorphosis (54 min)
Transition, transformation, translation. I approached these platforms quite by intuition. I want to explore what these archives will surprise me. One film from Japanese Animated Film Classics captured my eyes, titled Spring Song, it's a film made by one of a notable animator Ofuji Noburo. This short film is kind of like music video but without sound track, it shows how to sing this lovely song graphically. I found it's quite interesting how this small clip bridges two kinds of medium. On the one hand it refers to a song, a piece of music, on the other hand it is a film, a moving image. I am fascinated by this idea, how film creates a whole new interface from one medium to another, from invisible into visible. It captures the transition of forms, figures, movements, the rhythm of life. It gives abstract idea a material body.
Films:
1911 (15 min)
Cineteca MNC
1965 (2 min)
Nemzeti Filmintézet Filmarchívum
1968 (3 min)
Yale Film Archive
1931 (3 min)
Japanese Animated Film Classics
1915 (3 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1947 (2 min)
Danish Film Institute
1973 (26 min)
Irish Film Institute
Anna Briggs - Moving Image Preservation of Puget Sound
Cats! (89 min)
Celebrity cats rule the internet, but who were the cinematic felines that graced the screens of old?
Films:
? (2 min)
Chicago Film Archives
? (1 min)
British Movietone
1957 (1 min)
Istituto Luce
1928 (3 min)
University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections
1961 (1 min)
Institut National de l'Audiovisuel
1968 (1 min)
Texas Archive of the Moving Image
1968 (1 min)
Texas Archive of the Moving Image
1965 (3 min)
British Pathé
2019 (2 min)
National Football League Films Archive
2018 (2 min)
BBC Archive
1956 (9 min)
Ciclic
1958 (1 min)
Home Movies Archivio Nazionale del Film di Famiglia
1947 (22 min)
Prelinger Archives
1940s (1 min)
Oddball Films
2008 (1 min)
Yui Kugimiya artist's archive
1925 (2 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket
1961 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1956 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1908 (9 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1959 (8 min)
Yorkshire Film Archive and North East Film Archive
Fabian Palacios Ceferino - Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
Hypnosis by Fire (85 min)
Amy Winehouse died on July 23th 2011, that day I watched a great fire in my neighborhood: a place that creates sculptures was burning. I will never forget the sound and the image of the fire burning everything. It was hypnotizing. Fire creates and destroys: take the burning houses in Andrei Tarkovsky's The Mirror (1975) and The Sacrifice (1986), the boy who looks a campfire at the end of Michael Haneke's Time of the Wolf (2003), the woman who burns to death in Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander (1982), and the entire forest which catches fire in Oliver Laxe's Fire will come (2019). Fire is a destructive and creative element at the same time, it is a constant in films of all times and geographies. A short program about fire and its relations with the human presence: fire as war, as a domestic accident, as a romantic help sign, as a key element to cook food, as a political destabilizer, or as Johnny Cash's song Ring of fire. A weird fire call is the reason for this program. Do you have the matches ready?
Films:
1981 (26 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
1987 (2 min)
Repozytorium Cyfrowe FINA
1936 (10 min)
Filmoteca Valenciana - Institut Valencià de Cultura
1936 (11 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1962 (2 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1912 (9 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1911 (16 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1960 (9 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
Brian Meacham - Yale Film Archive
Rails on Reels (89 min)
From the earliest experiments of the Lumiere brothers and Porter's "Great Train Robbery" to the films of Keaton, Hitchcock, Ozu, and Bong Joon-ho, cinema and railways have a shared history of mechanical ingenuity, global ubiquity, and the obsessive love of devoted fans. Trains, like films, take their passengers on a journey, and have over the years afforded riders and filmgoers a chance to see views otherwise inaccessible through eye-opening travelogues and hair-raising chases. This series of films from five continents shows the ways in which trains are manufactured, used, enjoyed, and, when a particularly cherished line is endangered, even mourned. "Railways For Ever!"
Films:
1970 (7 min)
British Film Institute
1930 (8 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1930 (8 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket Norway
1930 (8 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1927 (12 min)
Museo del Cine
1939 (12 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1974 (1 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1964 (3 min)
Institut Audiovisuel de Monaco
1965 (9 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1896 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent FIlm Festival
Bhavesh Pratap Singh - National Film Archive of India
Cricket, beyond the stadium (24 min)
Glimpses of cricket, not just as a competitive sport, but how it has been part of PSAs, newsreel animation, commercials around the world, in the past century.
Films:
1984 (11 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1924 (1 min)
British Film Institute (BFI)
1950s (1 min)
National Library of Scotland
1985 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1948 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Klára Trsková - NARODNI FILMOVY ARCHIV
On the margins (35 min)
In the times of the pandemic people on the periphery can experience worsening of their marginalization. Therefore this programm of two short documentary films reminds the history of the secondary position of the Afro-Brazilian community and the European Romani community. The films show the spheres of various daily activities people go through to make a livelihood.
Films:
1960 (21 min)
Cinemateca Brasileira
1932 (14 min)
The Moholy-Nagy Foundation
Benoît Carpentier - Cinémathèque16
Le cinéma d animation comme langage universel / Animation cinema as a universal language (63 min)
Nous vous proposons ici un voyage kaléidoscopique faussement chronologique dans une matière instable, celle du cinéma d’animation. Un public de 7 à 77 ans pourra ici découvrir un cinéma protéiforme et poreux, un cinéma qui s’affranchit des formes esthétiques et des techniques académiques, du ruban 35mm colorié au feutre au fascinant écran d’épingles d’Alexeieff et Parker. Il semblerait même que ce cinéma se joue des technologies de son temps, redistribuant sans cesse les cartes et infusant ou se laissant infuser par d’autres formes. Il ne sera pas interdit d’y trouver des impuretés et des intrusions ! Il conviendra toutefois d’accompagner la séance via la distribution d’un livret ou en bonimentant la projection. ----- Here we offer you a falsely chronological kaleidoscopic journey through an unstable subject, that of animation. Audiences aged 7 to 77 will be able to discover here a protean and porous cinema, a cinema that breaks free from aesthetic forms and academic techniques, from 35mm tape colored in felt to the fascinating screen of pins of Alexeieff and Parker. It even seems that this cinema is playing with the technologies of its time, endlessly redistributing the cards and infusing or allowing itself to be infused by other forms. It will not be forbidden to find impurities and intrusions! However, the screening should be accompanied by the distribution of a booklet or by pitching it during the screening.
Films:
1896 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1920 (3 min)
UCLA
1929 (7 min)
Nga Taonga
1939 (10 min)
NFA
1935 (4 min)
NFAJ
1955 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland
1963 (11 min)
CNC
1970 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1978 (10 min)
Yale
1982 (5 min)
National Library of Scotland
1992 (5 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
Ana David - Batalha Centro de Cinema
To beer or not to beer (40 min)
A look back at the joys of communal life.
Films:
1900 (6 min)
Library of Congress
1910 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
1918 (2 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1938 (6 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1952 (15 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1967 (1 min)
South West Film and Television Archive (SWFTA)
1980 (5 min)
Northern Ireland Screen's Digital Film Archive
1980 (2 min)
Media Archive for Central England
1985 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
Jannike Curuchet - Mexican Film Institute
For the love of film (75 min)
In these times where most cinemas are closed around the world, this excercise seeks to serve as a reminder of the beautiful and significant value that cinemas have. A glimpse into the work of projectionsits who exist in the shadows and bring the film to life, but also to the inmense dedication of those film lovers who wish to take the film to remote places.
Films:
1944 (4 min)
Moving Image Research Collections
1962 (9 min)
La Cinémathèque française
1964 (23 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1956 (12 min)
BFI
1951 (14 min)
National Library of Scotland
1976 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional
KJ Relth-Miller - UCLA Film and Television Archive
Sans dialogue: Wordless Abstractions From Beyond The Silent Era (77 min)
Relying on the power of cinema’s primary language, this program is an attempt to connect with seeing audiences of all ages and from every region of the globe through the symbiosis of visual abstraction and non-verbal sound. Wordless storytelling has always been a strength of the moving image, dating back to the first five decades of filmic expression when visual representation superseded the spoken word as the primary means of unfurling a narrative. Looking well beyond the silent period to these works, which range in date from 1958 to 1978, we find a collection in which artists, amateur filmmakers and documentarians actively reject spoken dialogue as their primary mode of meaning conveyance. Seeking an emotional resonance in a register beyond language, this playful array of films engages the synchronicity of abstract music, sound, color and shapes to convey the very human emotions of anxiety, confinement, joy and wonder. No visual subject is off-limits: illuminated buildings in Bangkok inhabit the same sense of marvel as the whirs and electric lights of a pinball machine; geometric shapes take on surprisingly anthropomorphic characteristics; and the collage techniques that depict a 19th-century battle convey the same pain and erasure as the free-floating "figurillas" from the 6th and 7th centuries. Similar in experimental approach is each work’s avant-garde soundscape (save for the lone silent piece, “Today, 12 August 1968…”) rich with complex compositions and tonal experimentations far outside one’s expectations of a traditional film score. Beyond mere psychedelia and "visual acid for the eyes" (though there's a bit of that, too!), this collection considers stop-motion and hand-drawn animation, clay portraiture, nighttime cityscapes and playful montage as articulations of non-linear narratives unique to the moving image.
Films:
1970 (3 min)
BFI National Archive
1978 (10 min)
Yale Film Archive
1969 (7 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1958 (8 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1966 (6 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1972 (11 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1973 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional
1977 (9 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1963 (6 min)
George Eastman Museum
Guillaume Lafleur - Cinémathèque québécoise
Fugues en ligne (84 min)
Une promenade d'environ 80 ans à travers le monde et le cinéma. Le programme proposé entremêle des portraits de villes documentaires ou poétiques, des travelogues et des films plus officiels qui visent à documenter des événements sociopolitiques et culturels marquants. L'occasion nous est ici donnée de vagabonder à travers l'histoire du cinéma, les époques et les pays en observant les constantes et les variantes dans la manière de représenter et documenter la réalité sociale principalement liée à la vie urbaine.
Films:
1912 (1 min)
Cineteca, Torino
1910 (10 min)
National Film Archiv, Japan
1919 (1 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1927 (28 min)
Cinémathèque française
inconnue (11 min)
Film archiv Thailand
1933 (10 min)
Cineteca Chile
1950 (2 min)
Bibliothèque et archives du Canada
1965 (10 min)
Kinemathek, Bern
1978 (10 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Tzutzumatzin Soto - Cineteca Nacional de México
Washing day (39 min)
A range of thoughts and sensations are born on any given day. In this program we will surrender to the discomfort of the everyday, exploring its details, sometimes with humor. Un abanico de pensamientos y sensaciones nacen en un día cualquiera. En este programa nos entregaremos a la incomodidad de lo cotidiano explorando sus detalles, a veces con humor.
Films:
1896-1900 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1980 (1 min)
FINA The National Film Archive
1972 (4 min)
Institución Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1967 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducros Hicken
1964 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1915 (17 min)
Library of Congress
1978 (10 min)
Yale Film Archive
Varja Močnik - Slovenian Cinematheque
The Dinamics of Freedom (58 min)
A free atmosphere, person, society, or even an object always have a special and its distinctive dynamic. An air of freedom: we feel it or we miss it, we all know exactly what it means but everybody describes it differently. The history of film is definitely a trajectory of freedom of cinematic expression. And, film excels in tangibly describing very concrete and at the same time, even exactly the same moment, totally abstract concepts. That’s why I believe a film or a film program can connect us in understanding freedom, and also offers us some freedom while watching it. Let us think further – this program could definitely come with an antagonist program titled Stillness of Captivity or The Grip of Oppression. Also, this program would most definitely be totally different if I were making it in the context of my immediate knowledge and not in the context of The 2021 FIAF Programming Game. And here, once again, the beauty and freedom of cinema reveals itself, as beyond the (sometimes oppressive?) canon there are not only films but chapters of film history not yet known to us (but many times most important to some other). Is freedom a thing of perspective? Most definitely, and so is film history. Let’s enjoy the freedom it carries and reveals.
Films:
c. 1897-1901 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1922 (16 min)
Österreichisches Filmmuseum
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1958 (3 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1959 (14 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1967 (3 min)
Yale Film Archive
1977 (8 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
2001 (4 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
György Ráduly - National Film Institute Hungary- Film Archive
Rhythm (36 min)
Pulsation,movement, transitation.  In this short animation selection you can see different approaches to express the essence of the rhythm.
Films:
1965 (5 min)
Cinémathèque française
1985 (6 min)
National Film Institute Hungary - Film Archive
1932 (2 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1960 (14 min)
EYE Film Institute
1969 (7 min)
Danish Film Institute
1947 (2 min)
Danish Film Institute
Katia Mendez Best - La Cinémathèque française
Sur le chemin du culte - On the way to workship (61 min)
Venez parcourir un long chemin aux lieux de culte du Mexique au Tibet parmi les foules, chose qui pourrait nous paraître inconcevable aujourd’hui. Le voyage, l'arrivée au lieu, la vénération, l'apaisement, la joie, le temps passé ensemble et la promesse de recommencer l'année d'après...
Films:
1972 (21 min)
Cineteca Nacional de México
1967 (2 min)
Jerusalem Cinematheque- Israel Film Archive
Années 50 (4 min)
Institut Jean Vigo - Cinémathèque euro-régionale
Années 20 (12 min)
Filmoteca Valenciana - Institut Valencià de Cultura
1960 (17 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1940 (5 min)
BFI National Archive
Jakub Zgierski - Filmoteka Narodowa – Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
Stranger in the Village (57 min)
This program is inspired by James Baldwin’s 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village”, in which he describes his winter holidays in a secluded village in the Swiss Alps. “Naïve racism” of children parading blackface and shouting "Neger! Neger!" at him inform the main point of the essay – which is that Europe still approaches the issue of race with an illusion of innocence, while Americans no longer have the luxury of pretending Baldwin’s a stranger to them. We begin in a European village. In Northamptonshire a black girl is crowned as the Queen of May by her white peers. In Alsace, Senegalese infantryman are goofing around with white officers. These idyllic images were produced, respectively, by the British Colonial Film Unit and the French army at times when both these colonial powers needed fresh recruit (1943 and 1918). We conclude this part with a reality check – a story of Australian indigenous war veterans returning from service. The second part takes us to the USA in 1944, where segregated colleges are supposedly at the forefront of both “black progress” and the war effort. Then we peek behind the iron curtain to see how Polish communist propaganda trying to leverage the same idea of “black progress”, while inadvertently doubling down on stereotypes about Africa. We conclude with a short by Skip Norman – an African-American filmmaker working in Germany – who used Amiri Baraka’s play to explore the mythologies of racism, looking for its roots in sexual repression (bringing to mind another Baldwin masterpiece -- "Going to Meet the Man").
Films:
1944 (7 min)
British Film Institute
1918 (16 min)
CNC French Film Archive
2010 (4 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1943 (9 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1964 (4 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa–Instytut Audiowizualny
1969 (17 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
Maria Coletti - CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
Nous, les Autres. (80 min)
Le programme est à considérer comme une proposition de voyage dans le regard du cinéma coloniale du XX siècle. Un cinéma souvent exotique qui a placé les femmes au centre de l'écran pour dépeindre les «autres» comme une présence menaçante ou apprivoisée, comme dans les deux premiers titres. Dans le troisième titre on voit la tentative de démasquer et de déconstruire ce regard colonial. Pour enfin arriver à un regard empathique dans le quatrième film, qui rend hommage à un peuple consideré "autre" par excellence. Alors que dans le dernier film le regard est inversé: ce sont les jeunes filles algériennes qui parlent d'elles-mêmes et de leur rôle dans la société à la première personne.
Films:
1911 (14 min)
Cineteca del Friuli
1915 (7 min)
CNC French Film Archives
2001 (13 min)
Cinémathèque Française
1950 (24 min)
Cinémathèque Française
1966 (22 min)
Cinémathèque Française
Otto Kylmälä - KANSALLINEN AUDIOVISUAALINEN INSTITUUTTI / NATIONAL AUDIOVISUAL INSTITUTE
Archives as DJs (65 min)
Music and film link together in various ways. Film has captured music in all of its varied forms: everything from unpolished documentary footage, film scenes to technical presentations of recording sessions. Animation has offered different ways to visualize music particularly well, but also the fluid limbs of jazz legend James Berry. Like film, music expresses identity of nations and cultures effortlessly, crossing borders without having to queue at the customs office for hours. Fado singers from Portugal and the Carlos Gardel of Finnish tango, Olavi Virta both channel passion in their own way, as does the Hungarian rock band with their British pop infused folk song. Whether it is a dusty small town road in Romanian village or a glamorous gathering in Paris, music instantly communicates about heritage.
Films:
1940 (4 min)
National Film Preservation Foundation
1932 (1 min)
Jugoslovenska kinoteka
1937 (4 min)
Cinemateca Portuquesa
1954 (2 min)
National Audiovisual Institute of Finland
1967 (7 min)
Nemzeti Filmintézet Filmarchívum
1938 (11 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1944 (10 min)
British Film Institute
1958 (17 min)
Eastman Museum
Annick Girard - Cinémathèque française
Pina : Dansez, Dansez, sinon nous sommes perdus. (57 min)
Du film documentaire des Archives de Monaco ou du Canada jusqu'au film expérimental Ephemeral Blue, en passant par Pas à deux, qu'on soit triste ou gai, heureux ou malheureux, la danse est parmi nous. En attendant le monde d'après, continuons à aimer la danse.
Films:
1896 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1899 (2 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1961 (3 min)
Institut Audiovisuel de Monaco
1949 (10 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1988 (6 min)
Eye filmuseum
1911 (11 min)
Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique
1934 (8 min)
Japanese Animated Film Classics National Film Archive
1960 (16 min)
George Eastman House
Felicidad - La Cinémathèque française
La Jeunesse des années 1960 (47 min)
Cette programmation a pour thème « La jeunesse des années 1960 » et est constitué majoritairement de documentaires. A travers ces films nous pouvons voir les contrastes de vies entres différents jeunes à travers le monde. Les films offrent des témoignages forts, « El dia de la boda » de Alfonso Munoz et Gaston Martinez, film à caractère anthropologique, nous immerge dans les noces d’un jeune couple de la communauté Nahua. « Elles » d’Ahmed Lallem se fait porte-parole des revendications des femmes en Algérie. « It Goes On and On » de Cheryl Hunter (étudiante à la UCLA) rompt le silence sur la sororité et le mal être des étudiants.
Films:
1968 (11 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1966 (22 min)
La Cinémathèque française
1967 (14 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
Lucile Genoulaz - Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
Panorama industriel (62 min)
Retrouvez dans ce corpus non exhaustif, des femmes et des hommes au travail mais aussi des moments collectifs plus légers comme la fête des Catherinettes aux Usines Lumières en 1951. L’occasion d’un voyage dans le temps vers des métiers et des gestes parfois oubliés. Ce programme de films professionnels comme amateurs fait écho au projet Interreg Entre2prises porté par la Cinémathèque depuis un an et qui explore les archives audiovisuelles de l’industrie.
Films:
1907 (4 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée
1918 (15 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1934 (21 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1951 (3 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1961 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1918 (8 min)
Bundesarchiv
Marianne Bauer - Cinémathèque française
Artisanat et métiers au féminin, entre tradition et modernité (56 min)
Cette séance regroupe films primitif, d’actualités, éducatif, documentaire et rushes réalisés entre 1897 et 1950, et présente le monde du travail au féminin. Les femmes effectuent tous types de métiers, des métiers traditionnels dans le domaine de l’agriculture et de l’artisanat, mais aussi des métiers attribués habituellement aux hommes, notamment pendant la guerre, ou encore des métiers périodiquement interdits aux femmes. A l’exception d’un exemple sonorisé dans le cadre de sa restauration, le programme est muet.
Films:
1897 (1 min)
Filmoteca espanola
1918 (12 min)
Imperial War Museum
1925 (10 min)
Cinémathèque de Bruxelles
1927 (23 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1936 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1937 (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1950 (2 min)
Institut Jean Vigo
Young Jin Eric Choi - Korean Film Archive
To Wed! (77 min)
Having exchanged marriage vows with my wife just months before the pandemic hit and having attended many of the crowded weddings of my friends, colleagues, and loved ones before then, the marital ceremony as we know it has come to personally symbolize a sense of normalcy. While the specific customs vary from culture to culture, its fundamental concept as a festive gathering of loved ones witnessing the joining of two families is a tradition shared by billions around the world. It is but one of the many customs that have been negatively impacted by the current state of the world. But life goes on. This programme aims to showcase a selection of footage of wedding ceremonies recorded throughout the decades, hopefully reminding us that no matter how dire the world may seem now, the wedding and all its characteristics (the restlessness of the bride and groom, the seemingly neverending posing for photographs, the cheery marching procession of guests, etc) will never die.
Films:
(unknown) (1 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1906 (2 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
c. 1914 (3 min)
Australian Screen
1930 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1937 (5 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1938 (2 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1947 (2 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1947 (11 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1950 (18 min)
Filmoteca Espanola
1951 (3 min)
National Library of Scotland
1954 (8 min)
Institut Jean Vigo - Cinémathèque euro-régionale
Katerina Kampoli - ECPAD (Établissement de Communication et de Production Audiovisuelle de la Défense)
20th century advertisements, publicités, reklame, publicidades around the world (67 min)
We love them or hate them. They are silent, noisy or soothing, in color or in black and white, animated or with actors, serious or playful. They include various shots, or just a few. They make us dream, desire or provoke criticism. Retrospectively, they are potentially racial and gender biased. Their songs and punchlines can get stuck in our heads. They have adopted the moving images right from the start and have conquered every screen. They have permitted to directors and animators to make ends meet or to get noticed. They have a sole and unique purpose: to promote and sell! Ladies and gentlemen: 20th century advertisements, publicités, reklame, publicidades around the world.
Films:
19XX (5 min)
Academy Film Archive
1920 (1 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1930 (6 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1933 (1 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1935 (2 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1935 (2 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
1937 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1945 (13 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1949 (4 min)
Fondazione Cineteca Italiana
1950 (1 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken (Argentina)
1956 (9 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1960 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1963 (2 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1964 (2 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1973 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
Anders Annikas - Swedish Film Institute
Music, people (83 min)
No narration, just observation, and music. A few professional performers here and there, but mainly just ordinary, if gifted, people, playing and listening to music. COUNTRY JAZZ; a documentary about a jazz festival in the small town of Dubbo, Australia; plays out like a fast version of the influential documentary about Woodstock from the year before: aerial shots and close-ups, rehearsals and performances, snapshots of the audience listening, dancing, bathing. A beautiful gem, directed by Bob Kingsbury. STREET MUSIC is a near feature length direct cinema exposé of street performances from all over the United States, shot and directed by future Emmy winner Nick Doob – a D.A. Pennebaker associate who in the same year worked as a cinematographer on Town Bloody Hall and Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Look out for Gene Palma, in a performance reminiscent of his short scene in Taxi Driver. HELA HEDEMORA SJUNGER OCH SPELAR ("All of Hedemora sings and plays") is the odd choice here, but I wanted to include something from my home country Sweden, and this montage of people in the small town of Hedemora playing all kinds of music follows in the same vein as the other two films. Director Roland Engvall, an amateur filmmaker, has shot/directed hundreds of short documentaries. If nothing else, a great document on 80s fashion in the Swedish countryside.
Films:
1971 (11 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1979 (58 min)
Yale Film Archive
1984 (14 min)
Swedish Film Institute / Filmarkivet.se
Nuno Sena - Cinemateca Portuguesa-Museu do Cinema
Get a Life (66 min)
Looking at the life’s of others was one of the motivations behind cinema’s initial success and probably the main reason for its longstanding popularity. Even in lockdown (or even more so), our nature of incorrigible peeping toms drags us to watch for our humanity in the fragments of any life (real or imaginary) projected or displayed on a screen. Following Jean-Luc Godard’s famous bashing of any categorical definitions of fiction and documentary films (“All great fiction films tend towards documentary, just as all great documentaries tend toward fiction”), this program proposes a journey through an imaginary person’s life through disparate films (either factual or fictional) and regardless of any geographic or temporal limitations. Seen together and in a specific order, they form a kind of narrative arch that illustrate what’s more general and invariable in any human life (birth, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age and death). But here (by cinema´s powers to evoke the universal through the singular) each of these stages is made particular, detailed and picturesque.
Films:
1948 (11 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1964 (12 min)
Academy Film Archive
1951 (12 min)
British Film Institute
1910 (10 min)
EYE
1912 (17 min)
Library of Congress
1946 (4 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa-Museu do Cinema
Mariana Hristova - Bulgarian National Film Archive
Only Here for the Beer (76 min)
Through newsreels, documentaries and commercials, this program zooms into beer production, prohibition, promotion and consumption; as well as into its social and political function. The selection starts with two humorous early silent miniatures featuring a contagiously happy beer drinker and a thirsty corpse who sneaks out of the coffin in a chase for few sips. The next two films make a twist to more serious topics such as the Prohibition Law in USA and the beer tax announcement, however the cheerful mood comes back shortly with a reportage on a contest between goats that compete for a beer brand award. Beer brewing is represented by a technical documentary about a brewing plant installed on the board of a ship which was supplying British servicemen in the Far East with the spirit rising liquid. The following four pieces provide examples on different approaches in been advertising throughout different periods and cultures: from the detailed overview on production and consumption of the Bulgarian historical beer brand Shumensko pivo to music based, stop-motion and drawn animation commercials. Joyful newsreels provide insights to beer consumption habits on Polish streets and at a Brasilian beer festival, just before the program wrap up – a Finnish documentary about two friends who enjoy bar hopping around twelve beer pubs in central Turku in order to experience the lush folk culture of beer drinking.
Films:
1897 (1 min)
British Film Institute
1903 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1919 (4 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1932 (3 min)
Moving Image Research Collection - University of South Carolina
1934 (4 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1932 (14 min)
Bulgarian National Film Archive
1954 (3 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1960 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1961 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1968 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1970 (2 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1992 (24 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
Arianna Turci - CINEMATHEQUE ROYALE DE BELGIQUE / KONINKLIJK BELGISCH FILMARCHIEF
Mi manca il profumo del mare (67 min)
During the pandemic, one of the things I missed most was being able to see the sea and to breathe its smell. This short programme - entitled "Mi manca il profumo del mare/I miss the smell of the sea" - is dedicated to the sea. When you are born to the sea, if you cannot experience it for a long time, you develop a feeling of lack. Those who, like me, come from the sea, will be able to understand the feeling of missing one of the five elements: water.
Films:
1935 (15 min)
Svenka filminstitutet
1972 (20 min)
National Library of Scotland
1912 (4 min)
EYE
1925 (4 min)
Academy Film Archive
1946 (16 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1950 (2 min)
Archivio Nazionale cinema d'Impresa
1940 (1 min)
Institut Jean Vigo
Eva Hielscher - Altonaer Museum/Stiftung Historische Museen Hamburg (currently)
(Feeling) Blue?! A blue-inspired Journey through Silent Cinema (90 min)
The challenging times we are living in leave many of us feeling blue. However, while the color blue is associated with a low feeling in the expression “I’m feeling blue,” it has many different meanings, shades and facets. For instance, blue is linked to the cold, the sky and the sea, to distance and infinity, to nobility (blue blood) and to excellence, distinction and high performance. It is also said to have a calming and pleasant effect. So – let’s take a journey through silent cinema with the power of the color blue! And feel the blue tints and tones! Because, as we will see, blue in silent cinema has a lot to offer – water, the sea, winter and ice, the night (of course!) and being outdoors. It also appears as THE object of desire that, in some cases, can even bring love, fortune and happiness?! The latter is true from a cinéaste's perspective, for sure, as even cinema itself receives a blue shade. And as, finally, there is nothing more beautiful than the combination of a blue tone with a pink tint. And keep in mind, blue also only makes sense (visually and emotionally) in combination, contrast and alternation with other colors, including black and white.
Films:
1915 (2 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1920-21 (4 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1909 (7 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1917 (14 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1922 (5 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1913 (56 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
Chloé Cavillier - Fondation Jérôme Seydoux - Pathé
Sur le ring (60 min)
De la fiction burlesque Robinet boxeur (Luigi Maggi, 1913) à Combat de boxe, œuvre expérimentale réalisée par Charles Dekeukeleire en 1927, la représentation de la boxe au cinéma traverse aussi bien les genres que les époques et les territoires. Les films de cette programmation mettent en scène des anonymes comme des grands noms de la boxe, tels les poids lourds Joe Louis et Max Schmeling, qui livrent en 1936 un combat mémorable dont la Library and Archives Canada a conservé la trace. Ils se déroulent tantôt devant une foule captivée, avide de divertissement, tantôt dans l’intimité d’une rivière thaïlandaise, à l’ombre des regards, et suivent les athlètes depuis leur entraînement quotidien jusque sur le ring. Un montage rapide met parfois en valeur la tension présidant à un affrontement tandis qu’ailleurs, l’usage du ralenti insiste au contraire sur la précision ou la beauté chorégraphique d’un geste. La boxe est enfin un lieu d’expression privilégié des minorités, qui inversent alors les rapports de force habituels, à l’image des femmes immortalisées par Thomas A. Edison dans Gordon Sisters Boxing (1901), démontrant que la force n’est pas l’apanage des hommes.
Films:
1901 (2 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1913 (5 min)
CSC – Cineteca Nazionale
1927 (8 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1936 (21 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1963 (24 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
Alexandra Vasile - Harvard Film Archive
Gone Fishing (86 min)
You did not kill the fish only to keep alive and to sell for food, he thought. You killed him for pride and because you are a fisherman. You loved him when he was alive and you loved him after. If you love him, it is not a sin to kill him. Or is it more? —The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway

This selection of films explores the complex, dependent, and intimate relations between humans and creatures of the deep. Whether fishing for entertainment, sustenance, commerce, or sheer pride, people from around the world have engaged in this exploit of the waters. The program voyages through the varying ways that humans seek, interact with, portray, or utilize these aquatic beings. A fishing competition, a whaling expedition, a portrait of coastal life, a cooking companion, a tranquil day of angling—some of the works appear barbaric, while others are eerily dreamlike or comically playful. These documentary and fictional images encourage us to ask ourselves, why does this fascination with fish and fishing exist? Is it just the thrill of the chase, necessity, greed, or something else? What role does the water-based individual play in each of the narratives, different cultures, or singular lives? Why do we seek to destroy the things we cherish—the things of scintillating and organic beauty and allure? Perhaps we are driven by the illusion of purpose, or maybe we just do not know any other way.

Films:
1944-1948 (2 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1912 (10 min)
Library of Congress
1925 (3 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1947 (24 min)
Cinémathèque française
1947 (18 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1940 (7 min)
BFI National Archive
1950 (3 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1982 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
Oksana Sarkisova - Blinken OSA at CEU
Phantom Rides: Camera explores the world (84 min)
Since the early years of cinema, travelogues were important and much favored parts of film programs. They took the armchair travelers to most diverse parts of the world while shaping a particular “tourist gaze” which structured the world according to the naturalized categories of modern, exotic, and colonial. Travelogues were not only produced for commercial distribution, they were also made by amateurs and state officials. The program presents a range of travel films from the pre-WWII world to foreground multiple desires embedded in them – those of exploring and entertaining, mapping and registering, conquering and domesticating. The films in this selection demonstrate diverse approaches to representing space and expose a deep entanglement of cinema and colonialism. The image decay exposes the materiality of the medium and the transient nature of memory. With the pandemic challenge to our customary mobility, the program encourages us to revisit the desires of the early film publics for cinematic travels, the power of mediated image to structure the world, and our own perception of space and travel.
Films:
1897 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland
1913 (13 min)
EYE Institute
1924 (14 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1928 (10 min)
IWM
1930 (14 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket
1923 (27 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
ca. 1930 (2 min)
LA CINÉMATHÈQUE DE BRETAGNE
Andy Robson - BFI Film Audience Network
Green Monster (90 min)
Green Monster is an exploration of people’s changing relationship with their environment and the impact this has had on climate change and land use. It’s a glimpse into the various ways filmmakers have explored the connection between peoples’ way of life and their environment, and how these relationships have transformed over time. I was inspired by the British artist John Akomfrah’s Purple, a six-channel archive video installation focusing on the threat of climate change, exhibited at the Barbican in 2018. While selecting the archive film material, Akomfrah noticed that no matter what era or context of film there were key visual motifs present that add up to a history of the human impact on our shared environments. Akomfrah named this the ‘green monster’, adding a contemporary layer to overfamiliar footage of industrialisation, technology advancement and over-consumption.
Films:
1985 (25 min)
filmarkivet.se
1925 (4 min)
Academy Film Archive
1963 (7 min)
BFI National Archive
1954 (9 min)
Imperial War Museum
1972 (8 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
1973 (4 min)
UCLA Library Film and Television Archive
1985 (25 min)
filmarkivet.se
1944 (8 min)
Library and Archives Canada
Chau Hei Aki Kung - Reel to Reel Institute (Hong Kong)
Establishment of the Destiny (81 min)
Moving image and sound shall be a form of non-verbal communications, representing a conceptual actuality and complexity in life. In ancient Chinese philosophical discourses, realising the ‘decree’ and ‘fate’ means knowing one’s own position, by learning as much as you can the profound truth of all things in the universe, and understanding as deep as you can the nature of all beings. So as to establish and control one’s own ‘destiny’ by knowing it’s position and what ought to be done in life. The selected shorts are seemingly the realisation of this process, through their unconventional and unique storytelling, no matter how the endings are. And the sequence itself is a course of human life. There is not necessarily an answer, yet what the protagonists encounter in life, and how they treat themselves in relation with the environment are universal, regardless of the language and culture.
Films:
1977 (17 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1960 (11 min)
George Eastman Museum
1976 (4 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1964 (33 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1959 (16 min)
Cinémathèque française
Elena Iannetti - Filmarchiv Austria
Keep phantasy loud! (72 min)
The invention of cinema changed the way of looking at and conceiving reality in the 20th century: an incredible magical and story-telling tool, capable of manipulating the world, deforming it in an ironic, surreal, grotesque and dreamlike way. The real was no longer based on the principles of verisimilitude or coherence but on those of escape towards a poetic, magical and suggestive universe. It was more like a daydream, a stunning surprise, a phantasmagoria. Even when the succession of images were concatenated in a story, the absence of precise rules for the construction of the discourse made the narrative anarchic and discontinuous. Some sequences of the silent films of that era, despite the apparent fairytale and childlike simplicity, lull an essential metaphorical depth. This program celebrates the will of the silent cinema to strike the viewer's eye, his attention and his imagination, claiming his nature as an art for the masses.
Films:
1905 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1896 (3 min)
Cinémathèque française
1912 (3 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
1911 (7 min)
BFI National Archive
1908 (5 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
1905 (4 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1911 (8 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1907 (11 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1912 (14 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
ca. 1923-1930 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1927 (4 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1936 (10 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Lukas Maria Dominik - DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut
Events and Encounters (81 min)
In times of social distancing and lockdowns this programme tries to explore an international real and cinematic past of mass events and public spaces with all their random or intended encounters, the good ones as well as the bad ones, now only found on and possible in film.
Films:
1953 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny
1956/1957 (20 min)
DFF - Deutsches Filminstitut und Filmmuseum
1973 (9 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
1957 (4 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1960 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1957 (23 min)
Cinémathèque française
1960 (2 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1969 (11 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek - Museum für Film und Fernsehen
Igor Prassel - Slovenian Cinematheque
Resistance Through Cinema (68 min)
The first idea for the thematic programme came when i recalled The Idea, one of the most important political films that i watched. It is the only film made by the Bohemian animation film director Berthold Bartosch, who was a collaborator of Lotte Reiniger and Paul Wegener. Based on woodcuts by Frans Masereel, with music by Arthur Honegger, Bartosch's only surviving film was made single-handely in Paris between 1930 and 1932. Almost 45000 frames were animated on four different levels simultaneously, often with as many as 18 superimpositions made in the camera. I hope i am not breaking the rules of the game, as no FIAF related institution uploaded the film, but AFCA (https://www.afca.asso.fr/ressources/patrimoine/Bartosch) and CNC are in charge for the distribution of the restored 35mm film print. The programme pays hommage also to the early suffragettes fight, the anarchists fight against fascism in Barcelona and the Italian partisans fight against nazism. A special gem in the programme is Santiago Alvarez documentary on the struggle against racial segregation in the USA. The words of the song NOW refers to the urgent need of fighting with more efficient methods to obtain equality of civil rights for the Black American citizens.
Films:
1913 (1 min)
BFI
1930-1932 (25 min)
no institution uploaded the film, but AFCA and CNC are in charge for the distribution of the 35mm print
1936 (22 min)
Filmoteca Española
1965 (5 min)
ICAIC
1968 (15 min)
CSC - Documentalia
Alice Dupin -
Les Chats (38 min)
J'ai 12 ans et J'adore les chats. J'en ai deux chez moi. J'ai donc choisi le thème des chats pour ce jeu. C'était facile parce qu'il y en a beaucoup dans les films! :-)
Films:
1901 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1945 (1 min)
FINA
1906 (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1955 (6 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1954 (4 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l Ain
1973 (1 min)
Indiana Univesity
1951 (1 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1913 (9 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1973 (1 min)
Indiana Univesity
1945 (1 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1971 (1 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti
1969 (11 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
Mara Rusch - Munich Film Museum
100 years ago: 1921 (75 min)
Charlie Caplin released his heart-warming first feature film “The Kid” 100 years ago in 1921. Based on the film’s anniversary this programme goes back in time and takes a look at the world in 1921. Starting with a Chaplin competition in Australia it travels to India with Prince Edward, shows the Bavarian countryside and the picturesque landscapes of Belgium and Canada in the 20th century, follows an expedition to Indonesia and finally arrives at an ordinary American home. It shows, that while some things may change dramatically, others stay the same – even in times of a pandemic.
Films:
1921 (1 min)
National Film & Sound Archive of Australia
1921 (5 min)
Bundesarchiv
1921 (39 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1921 (7 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1921-1922 (2 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1921 (3 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
Julie Dragon - La Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Album souvenir (50 min)
Ouvrons l’album aux images. Fragments, bribes, souvenirs…, une vie se dessine. Qui est-elle ? … Nous ne le saurons pas vraiment… Pour ce jeu, j’ai eu envie d’assembler des pièces, de fabriquer une histoire intime aux chaînons manquants. A travers des films de familles, amateurs, documentaires, fictions ou publicités, à vous d’écrire maintenant cette vie imaginaire, le portrait en pointillés d’une femme.
Films:
1935 (9 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1904 (1 min)
Filmoteca Española
1944 (1 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1929 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa – Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
inconnue (1 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1957 (4 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1930 / 1940 (1 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1963/1965 (1 min)
Archivio Nazionale Cinema d'Impresa / CinemaimpresaTV
1963 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1960/1970 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1947 (1 min)
ACMI Collections - Australia
1949 (1 min)
Archivio Nazionale Cinema d'Impresa / MI RICORDO - L'archivio di tutti
1956 (1 min)
memoryscapes Il cinema privato online
1940 (24 min)
Yale Film Archive
1937 (1 min)
Library of Congress
inconnue (1 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Nicola Gallani - British Film Institute
This Working Life (75 min)
Since the Lumiere Brothers first filmed workers leaving a factory, the world of work has been a popular subject for filmmakers. As the nature of work continues to evolve and our relationship to work changes, this programme looks at how film has captured the lost traditions of working lives, the innovation and rhythms of the factory floor, and the idealistic promises of meaningful work and leisure for all. Featuring work from the Mutoscope and Biograph Company, Indian cinema pioneer Bimal Roy, and cinematographer Jack Cardiff amongst others, the films are often beautifully crafted and shot through with a sense of camaraderie and humanity.
Films:
1904 (2 min)
Library of Congress
192? (6 min)
Filmoteca Valenciana
1942 (15 min)
National Library of Scotland
1913 (17 min)
Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia
1936 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional Mexico
1952 (8 min)
IWM
1946 (7 min)
BFI
1972 (15 min)
Cineteca Nacional Chile
Elodie IMBEAU - La Cinémathèque Française
Tu me fais tourner la tête... (53 min)
On se fait beau, on se prépare pour aller à la fête . Là les manèges, les automates, la foule... la tête se met à tourner, on n'est plus très sûr de ce que l'on voit, les images se diffractent et on entre dans un grand cercle, celui de la danse mais aussi celui de la vie. Une balle qui s'échappe, la lune qui joue des tours et la danse qui tourne, tourne, jusqu'au bout de la nuit.
Films:
1928 (2 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'ain
1930 (11 min)
Filmoteca Espagnola
1935 (4 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1958 (2 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1956 (6 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1905 (4 min)
CINEMATEK
1908 (8 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1988 (5 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1976 (11 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Débora Butruce - Brazilian Association of Audiovisual Preservation
Latin American culture: a journey through music (75 min)
This program celebrates Latin American culture through films that address one of its most striking aspects: the music. This selection presents unique records of the musical richness of different countries in Latin America, such as Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Argentina and Chile. The music produced in these places has its own unique characteristics, and show the diversity and freedom of creation. Whether folk, traditional or popular, each genre express itself with the sonority of the culture it belongs, through presentations or popular festivities. We will see the record of a performance of Brazilian samba singers and musicians like Clara Nunes and Nelson Cavaquinho at the legendary Teatro Opinião, in Rio de Janeiro; the evocation of the indigenous musical past of the Ecuadorian province of Pichincha from Quechua mythology point of view and the carnival in Tepoztlán, Morelos, in Mexico. Moving to the video format we will present a television record of the rock band Serú Girán, which has become a cultural reference against the Argentine dictatorship; and, to finish the program, the rise of the punk movement during the dictatorship in Chile from the impressions of a group of teenagers. Although all works can be categorized as documentaries, these films, made in different periods and using different formats (film and video), approach the context in which this music was created in diverse ways, enabling the understanding of social and historical aspects and the cultural values of each country. Music is part of the Latin American identity and its history can be told through it: embark on this journey with eyes and ears wide open.
Films:
1981 (18 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
1961 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1978 (15 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1984 (21 min)
Cineteca Nacional de Chile
Maria Lorgia - CINEMATECA DE BOGOTA - GERENCIA DE ARTES AUDIOVISUALES DEL IDARTES
Love Streams (54 min)
This program looks at the views of different authors on love expressions in the early 20th century. These first moving images about this matter are very important not only because of their technical and conceptual creativity, but also because they started shaping present views (and stereotypes) of our ways we relate to the other in the present. Most of the films produced during this period have a predominant, romantic conception of love, filmed from a male driven perspective. This program intends to reflect on the enormous value of these images in terms of the visual representation of a conservative society, but also to open a conversation about what the images themselves hide or avoid to tell, demanding for a more diverse portrayal of what we have been as a society.
Films:
1898 (1 min)
SF Silent Film festival.
1899 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1907 (9 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1909 (9 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1910 (13 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1911 (6 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1930 (7 min)
Cinémathèque française
1934 (8 min)
Animation Film Archives
Valentin Halna - Centre National du Cinéma et de l'Image Animée (CNC)
Evasion de personnes âgées dans le temps, l'espace, et le rêve (59 min)
La programmation que je vous propose est directement liée à l’une de mes missions au Centre National du Cinéma et de l'Image Animée (CNC) : mener des actions de médiation au cinéma auprès de maisons de retraite/EHPADs, à partir de films du patrimoine aidés par le CNC. Cette programmation est plutôt un essai de programmation car je viens tout juste de commencer à construire ce projet de médiation et je n’ai pas encore pu intervenir en maisons de retraite en raison de la crise du COVID 19. Un thème conducteur m’est toutefois rapidement venu en tête : l’idée de « l’évasion » au sens propre comme figuré, dans le temps, l’espace et le rêve… Les maisons de retraite étant souvent perçues comme un milieu fermé et enfermant, il m’a donc semblé intéressant de proposer des films qui pourraient faire voyager et explorer le lointain voire l'inatteignable pour ce public, temporellement et spatialement; faire découvrir ou redécouvrir par le cinéma des lieux et des époques qu’ils ont pu ou n’ont pas pu visiter ou connaitre au cours de leur vie; susciter le rêve et l’imaginaire et de le partager ensemble, le temps d’une séance/ atelier… Ces films issus des collections du CNC, des Cinémathèques de Savoie et de l'Ain, de Toulouse, de la Cinémathèque Suisse, du Irish Film Institute, et de la Filmoteca de Catalunya, présentent diverses formes d’évasion : évasion par le rêve et l’imagination, évasion par les effets des rayons du soleil, évasion gustative et humoristique, évasion sous forme de vacances à la mer, évasion sensorielle, évasion à travers une belle rencontre, et plus généralement évasion dans le temps avec des images d’archives d’une autre époque, évasion dans différents espaces du monde, voire sur d’autres planètes, et évasion dans l’espace infini de l’imagination. La mise en œuvre concrète d’une telle programmation, impliquerait de construire et de mener une activité ludique autours du film en amont de la projection et un débrief interactif après la projection.
Films:
1949 (17 min)
Centre National du Cinéma et de l'image animé (CNC)
2019 (5 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1977 (21 min)
Irish Film Institute (IFI)
1909 (8 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1930 (2 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1912 (6 min)
Cinémathèque de Toulouse
Rastislav Steranka - Filmotéka, študijná sála SFÚ - Slovak Film Institute
Sweet Dreams or For a Better Future Through Sugar (67 min)
From sugar beet to dried fruits. A timeless journey from black and white sugar beet processing, sugar cane harvesting and male mateship through colorful maple tree sapping and sweet festivities in the snow and frozen delights straight into raisin future ruled by women. Sugar – to many a friend but just the same to many a foe. As explained in Sugar it’s only a bit of water, carbon dioxide and sunlight. And a secret only nature holds plus some industrial processing. The Cane Cutters from Australia are humble, hard-working men but if you cut cane with a man you’ll soon find out what‘s he like. A good mate’s a good mate and that’s that. It’s Maple Sugar Time in Canada and sugaring-off parties celebrate the first batch of the new year. The winter is behind and summer is ahead. You can’t go wrong mixing liquid sugar with milk and cream and freezing it because when summer comes, it’s All About Ice Cream. It’s on record that many of famous New Zealand athletes include ice cream in their diet. Whether they are training or not. But what does the future hold? A Hundred-odd Years from Now? Forget Men. Raisins are the real deal.
Films:
1946 (10 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1948 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1941 (8 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1964 (22 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1968 (17 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Nuria Castellote Herranz - Filmoteca Valenciana - Institut Valencià de Cultura
Poetics of the Body (68 min)
Movement and an anthropocentric approach are at the origin of cinema. So, from science to sport, this program focuses on physicality and sensuality of bodies in motion, which were object of fascination to early films viewers and even before, in pre-cinema experiences. The scientific approach is headed by Étienne-Jules Marey’s chronophotographic films. Those captivating images of naked men walking and jumping, with their harmonious constitutions, are conjured up by medical films about motion difficulties in patients with different diseases. Non-normative bodies and functional diversity also fit into the poetics of body. Back to forerunners of the Cinematographe, the lonely voyeurs of Edison's kinetoscope took pleasure in looking at Sandow’s bulging muscles. For its part, the Pathé flipbook Lutteurs introduces hand-to-hand combat (or is it a dance?), which we also find in one of the first sumo matches filmed in Japan and in Sport's hypnotic slow-motion boxing lessons. As in Sport fragments, which shows a female boxer, instruction in women’s self-defense is the subject of Hints to the Ladies on Jiu-Jitsu (“it behoves every girl today to be able to protect herself”), an unusual short film loaded with queer ambiguity. Whereas in Sport and Hints to the Ladies on Jiu-Jitsu women are empowered through sport, The Key to Beauty encourages them to stay in shape in order to fit the standards of feminine beauty (“why be fat if proper exercising will make you thin? ”). Les Six soeurs Dainef terrific show could be a resounding answer: why be thin if you can be chubby and amazingly flexible and strong? The frenetic rhythm of the Dainef sisters contrasts with the poetic magnetism of images at the beginning of Pelota Vasca. The physicality of vigorous bodies is devoured by the degradation of film footage. Is there a better metaphor to depict body vulnerability over time? But let's go for a happier end, because young people who train and flirt at Muscle Beach are unaware of that vulnerability. Joseph Strick’s short is a beautiful and sensual film in which bodybuilding is mixed with summer laziness, children's games and curious glances. A tribute to the body, but also to socializing and touching each other, those simple pleasures we miss so much in times of pandemic...
Films:
1889-1904 (27 min)
Cinémathèque Française
1898-1901 (7 min)
Arhiva Naţională de Filme
1894 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1896 (1 min)
San Francisco Silent Film Festival
1900 (6 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1920 (5 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1926 (4 min)
BFI National Archive
1917 (3 min)
George Eastman House
1903 (3 min)
Filmoteca Española
1925 (2 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1948 (9 min)
Academy Film Archive
Stéphanie Louis - Ecole nationale des chartes
Le livre dans tous ses états (ou presque) (60 min)
C'est en découvrant la publicité d'Huilor que l'idée de ce programme est devenue une évidence. Traquer les images du livre à travers les collections en ligne des affiliés m'a permis de voyager dans bien des pays et des époques, de me glisser d'une foire à un atelier, d'une chambre à coucher à un bibliobus. Vous verrez: le livre est partout! Films publicitaires, documentaires, propagande, fictions, films professionnels ou amateurs: le livre inspire et nous met aussi dans bien des états. Vous jetez un oeil?
Films:
1925 (7 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1939 (25 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1965 (4 min)
National Library of Scotland
1941 (7 min)
Imperial War Museum
1969 (2 min)
Indiana University
1950 (2 min)
CNC
1952 (11 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
Kate Saccone - MA Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image (University of Amsterdam)/Women Film Pioneers Project (Columbia University)
Dynamic Lines (75 min)
This program celebrates early forays into cinematic animation, offering a transnational sampling of different techniques (e.g., stop-motion, cutout, hand drawing), influences, and generic and tonal approaches used during the silent film era. Although presented in chronological order, I’m not suggesting any sort of formalized aesthetic or technical evolution. Interspersing advertisements and trick films, narrative storytelling and abstract experiments, educational initiatives and political cartoons, the selected films--made by the well-known, the less familiar, and the unidentified--are meant to be appreciated collectively as an impression of early cinematic animation at both the local and global level. Film animation, as we know it today, is at once bound up in the very history of cinematographic movement and constituted its own emerging artistic and technical practice during the industry’s first two decades. Here are films that rejoice in their own constructedness and, in different ways, present the unpresentable by transcending the limits of the photographic image.
Films:
1833-1897 (19 min)
Cinémathèque française
1900 (2 min)
UCLA Film & Television Archive
1909 (5 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
c. 1910s (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
1916 (10 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1919? (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1921-2 (3 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1924 (7 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1926 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1929 (7 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
Jacques Verdier - Institut Jean Vigo
La guerre d'Espagne (69 min)
L’Institut Jean Vigo possède dans ses collections un film 16mm amateur, L’exode d’un peuple, avec des images rares de la « retirada », l’exode des républicains espagnols. Du 28 janvier au 13 février 1939, ce sont 475 000 personnes qui passent la frontière française, en particulier au col du Perthus. Pour mettre ce film en perspective, je vous propose un programme autour de la guerre civile espagnole uniquement constitué de films amateurs ou professionnels réalisés à l’époque. Tout d’abord trois films avec des images de guerre issus de l’Academy Film Archive, le la Cinemateca Portuguesa et de la Filmoteca de Catalunya. Suivent deux films sur la présence étrangère dans les rangs républicains issu de la Filmoteca Valenciana et la Filmoteca de Catalunya. Vient ensuite le film de l’Institut jean Vigo sur l’exode de républicain. Enfin, le programme se termine par un film issu de la Cineteca Nacional de Mexico sur l’accueil des enfants de républicains par le Mexique.
Films:
1936 (7 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1938 (3 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1937 (2 min)
Filmoteca Valenciana - Institut Valencià de Cultura
1939 (30 min)
Institut Jean Vigo
1938 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
Archer Neilson - Yale Film Archive
How We Roll (88 min)
It's wheels on reels with this selection of cycling films, which begins with a tour through the the history, mechanics, and responsibilities of riding. We then look at the lifetime of delights bikes can bring, from childhood exploration through sports and stunts. Enjoy the ride, but remember: "you have a duty to the world when you ride on your bike."
Films:
1965 (25 min)
Library of Congress
c. 1970 (14 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1949 (9 min)
Irish Film Institute
1940s (2 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1951 (15 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1945 (8 min)
Imperial War Museums
c. 1950 (5 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1947 (10 min)
BFI National Archive
Mafalda Melo - IndieLisboa International Film Festival
Dos and don'ts: a field guide to 2021 (90 min)
Either you decide to follow unsolicited advice or you don't, here is a compendium that just might get you through this year (or is it era?). Cigarettes help with stress, but also do sports, and in this program they are not mutually exclusive. Don't let people tell you you're unfit for anything you'll find, make up your own mind. And remember that your personal hygiene today will influence your future tomorrow. Don't worry, here you won't find wellness gurus but you will discover practical information on how to have fun, keep clean, or maintain viruses afar. And other essential survival skills are also included: knowing how to recognize potentially deadly animals, and potentially deadlier political regimes. In the end, a dream of equality and longed freedom. And one last cigarette puff to finish the evening. I hope you find pleasure in this array of unsolicited guidance.
Films:
1982 (1 min)
Academy Film Archive
1971 (11 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1938 (9 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1921 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1930 (2 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1962 (29 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1914 (7 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1957 (29 min)
Library of Congress
1980 (1 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
Juan José Pereira -
Points of view about paraguayan culture (79 min)
A journey through the different views of Paraguayan culture, made by foreigners. Emphasizing different areas, from archives of espionage by the government of the United States through the Condor Plan, historical archives of the Spanish conquest, archival images of the great natural and cultural treasures of Paraguay, such as the Iguazu Falls and the musical genre called guarania. Being able to go through both socio-political and natural facts enriches the program to expand the look made by foreigners about a country, in this case: Paraguay.
Films:
1971 (2 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1961 (30 min)
Filmoteca Española
1948 (9 min)
El avance del Plan Cóndor sobre América Latina
Tamara Shvediuk - Gosfilmofond of Russia, Moscow
Back in time. A brand new program for a Moscow cinema in 1909 (67 min)
On November 10th 1909, one of the first cinemas of Moscow opened and today, after a long period without any activity, it has re-opened again with its original appearance and architecture. This cinema is a symbol of endurance of film culture over a 112-year period and it can be celebrated with an imaginary program which includes the best of the international film productions of the time, together with some contemporary newsreels. This selection of titles is not random, but has been made according to what we know of the Russian distribution business of that period, that means the heavy presence of French and Italian films released by specific foreign companies, the genres that were offered to the audience, running times and number of films for every screening and so on.
Films:
1909 (3 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway
1909 (8 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1909 (4 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1909 (14 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale
1909 (2 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1909 (36 min)
Cinémathèque française
Enrique Moreno Ceballos - Mexico Silent Film Festival
Diverse Forces: Women and Work in Early 20th Century (53 min)
How revealing can be early cinema about the diverse bodies and identities that faced with courage (and with no other choice) the heights of industrialization during the first decades of 20th century. In the light of Feminist Film History and free access of digital archive material, it is possible for us now to make cinematographic contact with women of different countries, and not only learn from their work experiences, but also to incorporate them into the collective demands of gender justice that are transforming the world we live in. In this regard, we encounter Argentinian factory employees that liberate their bodies in the public space by dancing on it; French young girls growing up in the middle of domestic labor and the manufacture of war materials; Mexican women active and visible in the photographic business; or Edison's workers whose faces remain hidden from the camera. Reunited, they invite us to think about how our contemporary societies have changed (or not) and how gender is still an element of importance for understanding the dynamics and transformations of our work spaces.
Films:
1904-11 (3 min)
Museo del Cine Pablo Ducrós Hicken
1914 (7 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1926 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1916 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1916 (9 min)
Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée - Direction du patrimoine cinématographique
1922 (24 min)
Library of Congress
María Hernández - MA Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image (UvA) graduate
Collective Grief (60 min)
At a time when we are witnessing the impact of inordinate levels of loss globally, the amount of distress we may be experiencing can be identified as a collective sense of grief. In addition to human losses, we are mourning the loss of many other things that were part of our everyday lives until recently. We are mourning for the loss of control and normalcy, the absence of socialization and proximity to our loved ones, the economic costs and the insecurity for the future. And, while grief is natural, it can easily become overwhelming, especially under forced isolation, making it difficult to find connections and heal. It is more important than ever to be reminded of the value of relying on social support in order to cope with grief. Paying respects to the victims is as important as giving meaning to what we feel, allowing us to move forward. This is something that has been reflected in funerary rites since the origins of humanity. This selection of films reflects how important it is, has been, and will be, the development of communal rituals to process loss. Across different geographic spaces and time periods we find common grounds. Music, signs, costume etiquette, recitation of commemorative speeches, and, above all, the collective presence of people, whether members of a living community, political supporters or family members.
Films:
1923 (3 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1964 (5 min)
BFI National Archive
1917 (8 min)
Eye Fimmuseum
1935 (6 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
2007 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1910 (17 min)
Cineteca MNC
1910 (4 min)
Film Archive Thailand
1960 (9 min)
Cinemateque Bretagne
1910 (7 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
David Havas - Narodni filmovy archiv in Prague
Television: Friend or Foe? (85 min)
Television as a media term is currently dissolving. Former cinema rival faces a similar re-evaluation as cinemas faced at the time of the advent of television. Vilem Flusser, Shirley Clarke or Rene Berger saw television as early as in the 1960s as an instrument of anti-communication and imperative, which forgets to engage in dialogue with the viewer, but also as a medium whose potential has never been fully realized. Can television archeology suddenly become a cinema programme? Can experimental television works by Chris Marker, Jean Renoir, Peter Greenaway and other authors be discovered for the film viewer? The following selection of short films includes works that revise television technology and its beginnings as a playful tool that stood at the birth of video art and multimedia, as a source of ontological certainty of man, as well as a powerful ideological tool that must be subjected to subversion of the audience and auteurs. However, this kind of subversion has always found it very difficult to gain space in television broadcasting. NOTE: For the first pioneering multimedia work by Ludwig Hirschweld-Mack, please scroll down at the website as there is no direct link for the "Cross-Play."
Films:
narrated print 1965 (original 1923) (10 min)
Harvard Film Archive
1951 (4 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1971 (33 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
1972 (1 min)
Imperial War Museums
1978 (9 min)
Filmoteka narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1969 (26 min)
Filmoteca Española
1964 (2 min)
UCLA Film and Television Archive
Federico Striuli - Film festival programmer / Ph.D graduate (Film studies)
WAR/VIRUS. A silent tribute to doctors, nurses and patients (77 min)
The current COVID-19 pandemic outbreak is a war to mankind not too different from the conventional warfare among troops in the early 20th century. This is all the more true from the point of view of the people on the other side of the “barricade”, namely doctors, nurses and patients, authentic unknown heroes on the “battlefield”. In the silent period of cinema, a significant number of newsreels focused on the plain portrayal of hospitals and on the promotion of new health services. Within this category, we find the most classical non-fiction films, where the visits of aristocrats, politicians or officers were shown at length to the detriment of an honest depiction of pain and illness, which was almost always missing. Then, particularly during the first world war and maybe not too much on purpose, newsreels and scientific footage showed what violence and death actually meant, and those images are still a shocking lesson for us all. Some of these harrowing pictures have been rediscovered quite recently and they will not fail in appalling the audiences, not for the footage itself, but for the sense of unfairness and cruelty they convey. All this would be too unbearable, and so some useful suggestions on how to protect ourselves from a “non-specific” pneumonia virus (echoing the current war on the virus) and the fact that it is still possible to laugh about doctors, nurses and patients (and together with them) will close the program, leaving us on a high note and, possibly, with a little more hope for the future.
Films:
1917 (9 min)
Národní filmový archiv
1913 (7 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1918 (11 min)
Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique
1918 (7 min)
Bundesarchiv
1919 (18 min)
BFI National Archive
1918 (7 min)
Imperial War Museums
1915 (10 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
Ruben Treiber - MA Film Heritage programme, Filmuniversität Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
Capturing Ethnics (90 min)
Deeply interwoven with the advent of film is the will of filmmakers to present the foreign to the audience in their home cinemas. The early ethnographic films offered the western, entertainment thirsty gaze, a never-ending pool of unique and in the long run seemingly repetitive images full of unusual appearances and exotic traditions and customs. Later films still used comparable imagery. Seen from a contemporary, critical perspective, the films reveal colonial structures. They are sometimes shown indirectly, for example when western travellers wave into the camera during local ceremonies, and sometimes directly, when the British responsibility for its colonies is addressed. The selection of curated films offers the audience space to reflect on some generally practiced self-evident aspects of filmmaking.
Films:
1984 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1940 (27 min)
Imperial War Museums
1960 (1 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1917 (2 min)
Arhiva Naţională de Filme – Cinemateca Română
1960 (3 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1904 (3 min)
BFI National Archive
1919/1930 (8 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1937 (8 min)
Cinemateca Brasiliera
1961 (16 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1962 (16 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
Maren Vöge - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
A Ghost Picture Show (81 min)
This compilation brings ghosts and phantasmagoria from all round the globe to your screen. Ghost stories have been passed on from generation to generation worldwide, whether to teach a lesson, to amuse or to shock and provoke fear. Ghosts are versatile, they can be evil or good, and each culture has its own traditions and tales of nasty creatures from the underworld or of good-hearted, helpful spirits. Naturally, this abundance of ghost stories also found its way into the world of cinema. But how to portray the transcendental on-screen? Drawing on examples from several different countries, with some dating back to the very beginnings of the “horror genre”, this film selection illustrates the sheer variety of on-screen ghostly appearances: from haunted houses, through Greenland’s ghost myths, a Japanese genie, to games with the devil; from amusing illusions to animations and travelogues. The range of stories portrayed encompasses different perspectives and transcends genres, proving that ghosts are indeed everywhere and never cease to amaze.
Films:
1896 (3 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1908 (6 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1911 (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1925 (16 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1931 (6 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1958 (3 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1965 (25 min)
Irish Film Institute
1975 (12 min)
Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna
1977 (3 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
Leona Schwarzer - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
FOOD DIMENSIONS! (72 min)
As the old saying goes, "you are what you eat." Making decisions about what we eat is a key part of our everyday lives. Food not only satisfies our daily need for energy and sustenance, it has also become an increasingly political issue over the decades. A scarce resource in times of crisis; a mass product in times of affluence, ever available in the neon-light-drenched aisles of the local supermarket. Having dinner, cooking meals, talking about food: All signs of how ingrained food is in our social lives. Food's ability to literally "bring people together" is exploited at the hands of advertisers, who turn this essential commodity into merchandise. But there are also more pertinent issues at stake: Under which conditions is the food we eat produced? Who profits - and who does not? How can food production be made sustainable when the very future of our planet is at risk? Will the shift to organic food consumption solve this problem once and for all or is there more to consider? This collection of films is designed to give an impression of the multitude and variety of contexts in which food has always been a central and highly debated topic within and throughout societies.
Films:
1927 (9 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1941 (6 min)
BFI National Archive
1960 (1 min)
Academy Film Archive
1926 (14 min)
National Film Archive of Japan
1948 (10 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1985 (2 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1982 (10 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1917-1920 (10 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1972 (6 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1945-1946 (1 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1938 (1 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1957 (1 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket
Sina Blum - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
Capital Cities Around the World (87 min)
Film has always had the power to transport us to new places, faraway or close. During a time in which we can no longer move as freely as we used to, the power of film to connect us with the rest of the world seems even more marvellous and vital. The following collection of films takes us on a tour of twelve capital cities all around the globe. Through the films, we are not only able to travel geographically but also to travel in time. We can visit cities as they existed in times long past, as in the case of Amsterdam in 1927. We can also witness them in times of change and upheaval, as in Bangkok in the 1950s. We travel to long-standing capitals like Edinburgh and can contrast them with cities that have only become their nation's capital more recently, like Brasília, or cities that held this status for a particular time, only to lose it again later, like Bonn. These historical perspectives challenge us to be more than mere tourists on a virtual trip around the world. The film about Copenhagen may not take itself too seriously, but most of the films in this collection are not as innocuous. Capital cities have, after all, always been at the centre of political attention. As such, their depiction on film is especially vulnerable to propaganda. Jack Cardiff's film of New Delhi in the 1930s is a particularly stark example. However beautifully shot the film may be, there is no denying its colonial overtones. This serves as a reminder that films should always be viewed in the appropriate historical context of their creation and the intentions of their makers. Thanks to film archives, we are able to explore these perspectives.
Films:
1939 (1 min)
Kvikmyndasafn Íslands
1927 (5 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1960 (17 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1932 (1 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1949 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa – Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1938 (9 min)
BFI National Archive
1957 (20 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1994 (16 min)
Cinemateca Nacional del Ecuador
1976 (7 min)
Arquivo Nacional
Milan Bath - MA Film Heritage programme, Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf
How We See Animals (87 min)
This selection of films reveals the wide range of roles animals play in human life; how they can serve as a source of nourishment, companionship, entertainment and transport, but also as trophies or as a source of danger and disease. Jointly, the films reveal the versatile and contradictory ways in which animals shape our culture and ultimately our identity as a species.
Films:
1909 (7 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1915 (6 min)
DFF – Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum
1918 (6 min)
Bundesarchiv
1914 (13 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1930 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1929 (2 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1957 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa – Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1943 (11 min)
Imperial War Museums
1915 (7 min)
Nasjonalbibliotheket
1926 (5 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti
1908 (4 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1977 (1 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1972 (3 min)
National Archives and Records Administration
1949 (8 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1938 (9 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
Fernando Chaves Espinach - Film programmer and writer
By the Sea (79 min)
Basking in the sun or swimming in cold waters, there is plenty of fun to be had on the beach. FIAF archives offer us endless glimpses of the world’s seashores and an opportunity to reflect on how the sea shapes a community’s understanding of itself, from Greeland to Australia and back to Venice. Fun in the sun, toilers at sea, and icy seashores soak the programme in the endless maritime possibilities and make us think of the vacations we had planned before the pandemic forced us indoors. Though we might not go on holiday any time soon, these archival treasures remind us of that day on the beach, when we fell in love with the waves.
Films:
1976 (1 min)
Irish Film Institute
N.A. (7 min)
Mémoire Filmique Pyrénées-Méditerranée
1956 (11 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1953 (14 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1955 (7 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1947 (14 min)
National Library of Scotland
1970 (9 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1924 (11 min)
Library and Archives Canada
N.A. (4 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
Ager Mendieta and Violeta Cussac​ - Filmoteca Española
Festivals, popular festivities and carnivals of the world (64 min)
We've compiled a series of documentary films which celebrate life in squares, theaters, villages... From the great Rio do Janeiro carnival to the most traditional festivals in Madrid neighbourhoods, including Thai ceremonies and regional Mexican fairs.
Films:
1930 (11 min)
Filmoteca Española
1976 (4 min)
Arquivo Nacional (Brasil)
1937 (2 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1961 (10 min)
ACMI Collection (Australia)
1932 (1 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1920 (2 min)
National Audiovisual Institute (Finland)
1964 (3 min)
Institut Audiovisuel de Monaco
1905 (13 min)
Cinémathèque Suisse
1936 (8 min)
Cineteca Nacional (México)
Ager Mendieta and Violeta Cussac​ - Filmoteca Española
Agricultural world in images (88 min)
A lot of festivities are celebrated at this time of year along the northern hemisphere, celebrating the awakening of nature and the fertility of the land. Thanks to the FIAF archives we can have a picture of many customs and relatioships with the agriculture over time. This is a compilation of the agrarian life and a look to the agricultural sector, from France to Mexico at the beginning of 20th century, until Ecuador and United States in the 1960s.
Films:
1952 (3 min)
Arquivo Nacional (Brasil)
1947 (15 min)
ACMI Collections (Australia)
1920 (10 min)
CNC French Film Archive Collections (France)
192? (5 min)
CulturArts IVAC (Spain)
1940 (10 min)
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research
1965 (27 min)
Cinemateca Nacional Ecuador
1961 (17 min)
Indiana University (USA)
Isabelle Vanini - Forum des images
A la découvertes des trésors du cinéma d'animation (II - long-métrage) (75 min)
Pour les curieux qui ont un peu de temps, un long métrage d’animation hongrois magnifique, l'épopée romantique et psychédélique du réalisateur hongrois Marcell Jankovics. « Ce film raconte les aventures extraordinaires du jeune berger János Vitéz, qui abandonne son village natal pour rejoindre une compagnie de hussards en route pour la France, afin de mieux combattre l’invasion turque. Avec très peu de dialogues, des dessins très stylisés, une palette de couleurs très étendue et une galerie de personnages mythologiques à la forme changeante, "Jànod Vitéz" le premier film d'animation hongrois, est un magnifique voyage. Il s’agit d’une commande officielle, destinée à commémorer le 150 ème anniversaire de Sandor Petofi, poète national. » (http://www.baz-art.org/archives/2019/06/14/37427253.html)
Films:
1973 (75 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
Isabelle Vanini - Forum des images, Paris
A la découvertes des trésors du cinéma d'animation (I - courts-métrages) (63 min)

Ce programme est une « balade » au sein des collections des différentes archives internationales de la FIAF, à la découverte des trésors qu’elles recèlent en cinéma d’animation. Non thématisé, suivant plutôt un classement chronologique, il témoigne de mes émerveillements et envies de faire découvrir à mon tour ces films.

1.Un des premiers, si ce n’est le premier documentaire animé de l’histoire du cinéma, signé Winsor Mc Cay – créateur de Little Nemo, pionnier du cinéma d’animation (Gertie le dinosaure) et artiste engagé (Le naufrage du Lusitania est un film de propagande recréant le naufrage en 1915 du paquebot britannique RMS Lusitania, lequel n'a jamais été photographié, afin de convaincre les Etats-Unis d’entrer dans la 1ère Guerre mondiale).

2. Pour rester sur les grands pionniers, voici un film du trop rare Segundo de Chomon, l’un des maîtres incontestés des premiers trucages cinématographiques et des débuts de la mise en couleurs des images animées.

3. On saute dans les années 40, avec ce film produit par le ministère britannique de l’Information de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, sur la sécurité routière encourageant les enfants à s’arrêter et à regarder avant de traverser la route.

4. Autre véritable découverte, pour moi qui aime beaucoup les films de marionnettes, une publicité de 1948, dans le fonds de la Cinémathèque suisse.

5. Voici le premier dessin animé thaïlandais réalisé par Payut Ngaokrachang dont je ne sais rien (il a une page wikipedia) ! Une belle curiosité…

6. Au gré de mes pérégrinations, je suis tombée sur le cinéaste d’animation danois Bent Barfod qui a contribué au renouveau de la production d’animation danois (et dont la marque de fabrique est le papier découpé). Une nouvelle cinématographie inconnue à explorer.

7. Petit bond dans les années 70, je découvre, dans les archives du Lichtspiel/ Kinemathek Bern, un très joli film de Bettina Truninger, dessinatrice, peintre, caricaturiste et illustratrice.

8. Pour ceux qui ne le connaissent pas, le grand réalisateur d’animation polonais Jerzy Kucia que j’ai eu le plaisir de fréquenter à plusieurs reprises, est à l’honneur à la Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA).

9. Un passage par le site du Eye Filmmuseum me permet de revoir un peu d’images de William Kentridge. Originaire d’Afrique du Sud, avant tout dessinateur, il est également graveur, sculpteur, cinéaste, acteur et metteur en scène. Son œuvre foisonnante offre une vision tout à la fois poétique et critique de sujets parmi les plus délicats comme la décolonisation, l’Apartheid, les conflits politiques ou le rôle de l’Afrique dans la Première Guerre mondiale.

10. Pour finir, deux œuvres de jeunes cinéastes des années 2010 :

* Dans le fonds d’Indiana University, je visionne un extrait d’un film en volumes à la personnalité forte, signé Kristin Dowell, qui n’est pas sans faire penser au travail des frères Quays.

* A l’époque, la découverte du court métrage d’Adrien Merigeau en festival fut un enchantement, le retrouver et le partager, est une joie : Old Fangs (co-réalisé avec Alan Holly) sélectionné à Sundance en 2010, est petit bijou du film d’animation dont le trait et le style semblent à première vue éloignés de l’univers « celtique » de Tomm Moore mais qui à y regarder de plus près contient déjà de jolies passerelles entre les deux cinéastes.

Films:
1918 (15 min)
Library of Congress
1923 (8 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema
1947 (1 min)
Imperial War Museum
1948 (8 min)
Cinémathèque suisse
1955 (7 min)
Thai Film Archive
1958 (6 min)
Danish Film Institute
1972 (3 min)
Lichtspiel/ Kinemathek Bern
1979 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
2014 (1 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
2010 (11 min)
IFI Film Archive
Oliver Hanley - Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf / Member of FIAF's Programming and Access to Collections Commission
Let's Go To The Movies! (88 min)
Famously described by Martin Scorsese as "the church of the 20th century", where the masses flock to worship a veritable pantheon of (screen) gods, the cinema has served as a key source of information and entertainment, as a valuable propaganda tool, and as a major place of social interaction - on physical, emotional and intellectual levels - for 125 years. Until only recently, the cinema has been a constant fixture in the lives of human beings of all ages, races, genders and creeds, and has endured even throughout humankind's darkest hours in the past (including two world wars). This programme brings together 14 short films and extracts of various forms and genres in a collective celebration of the dispositif cinema and the act of cinema-going. The films are presented below in chronological order, but viewers are welcome to dip in and out at any point they like. When the inept eponymous character of "Arthème opérateur" (played by Ernst Servaes, who also directs) answers a job ad for a cinema projectionist, chaos ensues. In "Al cinematografo, guardate... e non toccate" (At the Cinema Show), a production of the Turin-based Itala company, it is this time not the projectionist but a licentious audience member who wreaks havoc in the movie theatre. The German propaganda film "Das Kino als Berater" from animation legend Julius Pinschewer presents an advertisement for war bonds as a film-within-a-film. "Running a Cinema", from the British "Memoirs of Miffy" cartoon series, deftly sends up a typical cinema programme of the time. The Finnish educational film "Elokuvateatteri ennen ja nyt" (A Movie Theatre Before And Now) blends documentary and fiction techniques to inform on fire-safety measures at a (then) state-of-the-art cinema. In "Ein Parkett der Prominenten", a cavalcade of Hollywood stars can be seen parading before the camera at the gala premiere of Frank Lloyd's Academy Award-winning biopic "The Divine Lady". "Midt i Byens Hjerte" (At the Heart of the City) depicts the construction of the Palladium cinema in Denmark's capital Copenhagen. Out-take footage from a wartime American newsreel shows a mobile cinema used for entertaining American troops on the front lines being set up. The educational film "Let's Go To The Movies" presents a compact history of the American motion picture industry. Confectionery has been a common fixture of the cinema-going experience since time immemorial, as the silent advertisement for the Lyceum Cinema in Dumfries, Scotland, illustrates. A Hungarian newsreel item from March 1960 humorously demonstrates how not to behave at a cinema screening. A Thai news report from 1st October 1967 documents the introduction of automatic ticket dispensers at local cinemas. Another newsreel extract reports on the re-opening of the refurbished cinema at the Fluminense Federal University in Brazil in 1974. Finally, the short Mexican documentary "Cine Móvil México" chronicles an ambitious mobile cinema project by the Cineteca Nacional to bring the wonder of cinema to the remotest parts of the country.
Films:
1910 (7 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1912 (6 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema - Fondazione Maria Adriana Prolo
1918 (2 min)
Bundesarchiv
1921 (7 min)
BFI National Archive
1929 (16 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti / National Audiovisual Institute
1929 (7 min)
Österreichisches Filmmuseum
1938 (8 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1944 (3 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1948 (10 min)
Library of Congress
1950s (2 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1960 (2 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1967 (3 min)
Film Archive (Public Organization), Thailand
1976 (13 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
Laure Gaudenzi - CINEMATHEQUE UNIVERSITAIRE
Il y a des visages plus beaux que le masque qui les couvre (55 min)
Formule empruntée à Jean-Jacques Rousseau dans "Emile ou De l'éducation" . On ne s'évade pas du temps... De 1903 à 2020, voici un éventail de masques composé de huit propositions qui tendent vers toujours plus de fraternité, de complicité et de solidarité. Avec une pensée pour celles et ceux qui n'ont pas la tête à jouer un peu.
Films:
1993 (20 min)
Svenska Filminstitutet
1923 (4 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmintézet Filmarchivum
1942 (12 min)
Cineteca Nacional (México)
1931 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny
1930 (3 min)
Cinemateca Portuguesa
1920 (3 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
2020 (11 min)
Cinémathèque française
Foteini Klini - MA Film Programming and Curating student, Birkbeck College
House: a structure that people live in (68 min)
Newsreels, documentaries, commercials and sponsored films shape this programme as an attempt to observe the multifaceted nature of the house. From a driftwood cabin made by Captain Adelbert Smith in 1929, to a prefabricated house chosen by the Hansen family in 1964, the house as a building varies in conception, construction process, shape, form and function. Focusing on the building process, verbally or visually, these films visit the house as a structure that produces space, shelter and relationships. The house in the programme acts as an experiment, as intellectual property, a work of art, a construction challenge, an opportunity to showcase craftsmanship and as a temple of dreams. The films date from the early 1920s to the late 1960s, with the final film offering a glimpse into what was then the future, into 1999. "So", as Adelbert Smith said in 1929, "I live here now all the time - I'm going to make it my home."
Films:
1923 (1 min)
Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision
1929 (5 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
1931 (3 min)
BFI National Archive
1946 (11 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1956-1958 (14 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1964 (7 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
1967 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1967 (26 min)
National Film Preservation Foundation: Screening Room
Ann Cameron - National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
Scaling the Heights! (88 min)
Coming from Scotland, 'The Land of the Mountain and the Flood', I was drawn into the FIAF archives to find films that would take me somewhere far away from that overly romantic view of mists and heather! I wasn't disappointed. I have arranged 13 films chronologically to encourage you to escape and explore. I discovered some quirky examples of film-making in the mountains (try driving a car up one or having a sit down dinner on a bridge between them!) But what really struck me was the beauty of silence. A lot of the films in this selection happen to be silent, and I am in awe of those early pioneers, lugging their camera into dangerous situations to capture snapshots of a time and place now gone. Ascend Mount Hood in Oregon and join a phantom ride through The Lotschberg Tunnel back in the early 1900s at the click of your mouse. Sound features too, of course. For example, the Chilean Spanish commentary on copper mining in the Andes, the unusual music accompanying shepherds in Slovenia, or the intense explanation of rope exercises in the Pyrenees - although I couldn't always understand them such soundtracks inexplicably enhanced the experience of watching the films. Make sure you stay until the very end to watch an awe-inspiring film that brings together imposing scenic shots with sound and fury - this film as well as the others before demonstrate why it is quite unlike any other medium for transporting you to another time and place. (Finally, a thank you to all the FIAF archives for their careful preservation and documentation of all the films selected in this programme. Without the programme notes and catalogue information the films would certainly not be as meaningful)
Films:
1911 (1 min)
British Film Institute
1913? (1 min)
Eye Filmmuseum, Netherlands
1910 (4 min)
The New Zealand Archive of Film, Television and Sound Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua Me Ngā Taonga Kōrero
1917 (12 min)
National Film Preservation Foundation, USA
1930s (1 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema Film Collection, Torino
1934 (2 min)
Jugoslovenska Kinoteka
1937 (2 min)
Filmoteca de Catalunya
1940 (10 min)
National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales/Archif Sgrin a Sain
1955 (5 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1957 (9 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1957 (18 min)
Cineteca National de Chile
1967 (9 min)
Indiana University Audio Visual Center
1970 (14 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
Florian Höhensteiger - MA Film Heritage programme, Filmuniversität Babelsberg Konrad Wolf / Zeughauskino Berlin
Booze and Us (84 min)
This compilation highlights the joys and dangers which come with the production and consumption of alcoholic beverages. We see the highly specialized processes of brewing beer, making wine and distilling cognac, followed by the always compulsory tasting at the end. We will be informed about the rich taste of Australian wine, enlightened about the secrets of a Scottish brewery located in the oldest inhabited building of the country and can enjoy the music of the Portuguese field workers while harvesting the grapes. However, each glass comes with the risk of loss of control and making a fool of yourself or in the worst case alcoholism. The second part of this film programme shows, why it is unwise to drink while boating, that too many drinks can make the camera swing in unison with the drunkard, as well as how to handle your liquor properly at an US college party and ultimately how liquor should be dealt with in the eyes of the prohibitionists: spilled out in the street. In between advertisements for Finnish beer, bourbon from New Zealand and others glamorize the ideal world of drinking and enjoying yourself, while the German filmmaker Harun Farocki satirizes the made up world of the commercials in an early student film.
Films:
1917 (1 min)
Danish Film Institute
1962 (12 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image
1960 (1 min)
Kansallinen audiovisuaalinen instituutti
1975 (6 min)
National Library of Scotland
1975 (5 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1982 (1 min)
The New Zealand Film Archive, Ngā Kaitiaki O Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua
1950 (12 min)
Filmarkivet Sweden
1955 (9 min)
Cinemateca Portugesa
1958 (1 min)
Nasjonalbibliotheket / National Library of Norway
1966 (5 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1917 (5 min)
BFI
1979 (5 min)
National Film & Sound Archive of Australia
1954-56 (1 min)
EYE Filmmuseum
1977 (15 min)
Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive
1928 (5 min)
University of South Carolina
Anke Hahn - Deutsche Kinemathek
Here is looking at you - KIDS! (84 min)
Children habe been popular "objects" for cameras ever since the beginning of cinema. They appear early in Home Movies, are seen in dramas and comedies as famous child actors or are focused on in educational or political documentaries. One might say that there is a natural affinity between children and cinema. Their (apparent) authenticity conveys truthfulness and charms the spectators. At the same time, they are the target of educational programs that put an end to their genuineness. The eleven films chosen for this programme combine these elements and include Home Movies, fiction films as well as documentaries from 1914 to 1969.
Films:
1928 (2 min)
Cinémathèque des pays de Savoie et de l'Ain
1913 (23 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1914 (7 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1969 (11 min)
Deutsche Kinemathek
1944 (1 min)
Library and Archives Canada
1936 (2 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1934 (2 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1962 (1 min)
Nemzeti Filmintézet Filmarchívum
1957 (2 min)
Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
1956 (32 min)
Lichtspiel / Kinemathek Bern
1929 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA
Massimo Benvegnú - Film Programmer
Massimo's Tour of Italy from His Living Room (80 min)
My homeland has been heavily hit. This programme is an hommage and a reminder of the affection Italy receives from the whole World. Almost every FIAF institution holds images coming from there - so I made a choice for the unusual and the aesthetically challenging instead of just going for the "grand tour" pretty postcard effect. Also, I made a point of selecting different formats (Super8, 16mm...) and narratives, have different voices be heard than the usual. What better moment than this, to dig a little deeper, and explore new territories, among the very familiar? So, heavily decayed nitrate film of Venice juxtapose with the fairly tinted frames of an untouched countryside in 1909, breath-taking aerial images of Rome and Pompeii taken from an airship (!) bounce on the deliciously pop colors of the Riviera in the 1950s. And while a solitary guard and his dog practice social distancing patrolling the snow caps of Vallée d'Aoste, it all ends with a kolossal production in Super8, soundtrack and all, with a group of French tourists hopping on and off through the most beautiful sights of Northern Italy. A good memory of what it was like, and a wish to be able to do it again soon. I hope you all enjoy the ride, and thanks again to the institutions for the materials I used. MB (Technical notes: Film 1 Italian intertitles, musical soundtrack. Film 2 Norwegian intertitles, silent. Soundtrack suggestion: Offenbach's 'Barcarolle'. Film 3 Italian intertitles, silent. Soundtrack suggestion: Chopin's 'Fantaisie Impromptu (Op.66)' or The Smashing Pumpkins' 'Tonight, Tonight'. Film 4 English titles, musical soundtrack. Film 5 French voice-over, sound. Film 6 French titles, musical soundtrack. In all cases full comprehension of texts and dialogues is not necessary to follow the narrative or appreciate the content of the films. Enjoy!)
Films:
190? (3 min)
Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Torino
1909 (3 min)
Nasjonalbiblioteket, Oslo
1920 (11 min)
CSC - Cineteca Nazionale, Rome
1954 (21 min)
National Library of Scotland - Moving Image Archive, Glasgow
1970 - 1973 (9 min)
Cinémathèque des Pays de Savoie et de l'Ain, Veyrier-du-Lac
1980 (33 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne, Brest
Nour Ouayda - Metropolis Cinema Association | Cinematheque Beirut
(G)rêve Générale - General Strike (68 min)
From trade union general strikes, to May Day marches, student revolts, queer uprisings, and anarchist riots this program looks at various figures of protest. Cinema and the media (much of the conserved footage are official newsreels) followed and recorded these events, creating an ever-growing archive of socio-political contestation that spans across the history of moving images. In the current global context and after months of multiple and simultaneous uprisings sparking all over the planet, looking back at these images places our bodies today in the continuity of those that lead similar fights before us.
Films:
1969 (8 min)
Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna
1919 (1 min)
Library and Archives Canada / Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
1911 (2 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1947 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacional (Mexico)
1964 (1 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1970 (12 min)
Library of Congress
1913 (7 min)
BFI National Archive
1922 (2 min)
Irish Film Institute
1947 (1 min)
Filmoteka Narodowa - Instytut Audiowizualny (FINA)
1934 (4 min)
Filmoteca Valenciana - Institut Valencià de Cultura
Edoardo Milan -
Dance dance dance (22 min)
FIAF archives offer us access, amongst other things, to an incredible number of films showcasing cultural expressions from around the world. This selection brings together a series of videos witnessing powerful and diverse dancing traditions from Australia to Denmark, from Algeria to South Carolina. As Pina Bausch famously said: "Dance, dance, otherwise we are lost".
Films:
1895-1900 (3 min)
Cineteca di Bologna
1897-1899 (1 min)
Filmoteca Española
1928 (5 min)
Moving Image Research Collections - University of South Carolina
no date (2 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1915 ca. (6 min)
National Library of Scotland Moving Image Archive
1898 (1 min)
Library of Congress
1898 (1 min)
National Film and Sound Archive of Australia
1981 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1930 (2 min)
Det Danske Filminstitut
Christophe Dupin - FIAF
Football! (85 min)
Over the last few weeks, many of us football (soccer) fans have been deprived of football games on television (in the stadium). However, FIAF archives are full of great films about the Beautiful Game. Here's below a programme of films about football. Match reports from all around the world (going back to the start of the last century), documentaries and short fiction about the game, interspersed with a few football-related adverts.
Films:
1911 (1 min)
Cineteca Nacionale de Chile
1918 (1 min)
Magyar Nemzeti Filmarchívum / Hungarian National Film Archive
1921 (1 min)
BFI National Archive
1970 (2 min)
Arquivo Nacional
1922 (6 min)
Cinémathèque royale de Belgique
1935 (6 min)
Eye Filmmuseum
1970s (1 min)
IFI Irish Film Archive
1959 (4 min)
Cinémathèque de Bretagne
1978 (2 min)
FINA
1922 (5 min)
Danish Film Institute
1972 (10 min)
Filmoteca Española
1941 (4 min)
Imperial War Museums